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Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
4; 74, 1; 81, 2; 91, 2; 96, 2 Mount Crawford, Va. 74, 1; 81, 4; 82, 12; 85, 1, 85, 31; 94, 2; 100, 1; 135-A; 137, C3 Mount Elba, Ark. 47, 1; 135-A; 154, F4 Mount Ida, Ark. 47, 1; 159, D12 Mount Jackson, Va. 43, 7; 81, 5; 82, 3; 84, 9, 84, 11; 85, 1, 85, 21, 85, 22; 94, 2; 100, 1; 137, B4 Mount Pleasant, Ala. 110, 1; 135-A; 147, B4 Mount Pleasant, Tenn. 24, 3; 30, 2; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, B5 Mount Sterling, Ky. 118, 1; 135-A; 141, D3; 171 Mount Vernon, Ala. 110, 1; 135-A Mount Vernon, Ark. 154, B7; 171 Mount Vernon, Ind. 150, A2; 151, G3 Mount Vernon, Ky. 9, 2; 118, 1; 135-A; 141, G2; 150, C12 Mount Vernon, Mo. 47, 1; 119, 1; 135-A; 152, D4; 160, C12; 171 Mount Washington, Ky. 150, A9; 151, F10 Mount Zion Church, Va. 76, 5; 87, 4; 93, 1; 94, 2 Fort Mouton, Ala.: Plan 108, 3 Muddy Branch, Md. 7, 1; 27, 1; 100, 1 Muddy Creek, Tenn. 149, C1 Muddy River, Ky. 150, D5 M
. And be it further resolved, That the president of this convention be, and is hereby instructed to transmit forthwith, a copy of the foregoing preamble, ordinance and resolution to the governors of the several States named in said resolutions. Done by the people of the State of Alabama in convention assembled at Montgomery, on this, the 11th day of January, A. D. 1861. During December and January, Governor Moore had taken possession of Forts Morgan and Gaines and the arsenal at Mount Vernon. The forts were strongly garrisoned; and when the ordinance of secession was passed, the State was full of volunteers, busily drilling and preparing for hostilities. Col. Tennent Lomax commanded the Second regiment of Alabama militia, which had been organized soon after the John Brown raid, and his were the first troops of Alabama to take position in preparing for the great struggle. After two months this regiment was disbanded and Colonel Lomax was put in command of the Third Alabam
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
hich there were none wherewith to equip the troops now daily taking the field. The arsenal at Charleston and the depot at Savannah were occupied chiefly with local work. The arsenal at Baton Rouge was rapidly getting under way; and that at Mt. Vernon, Ala., was also being prepared for work. None of them had had facilities for the work usually done at an arsenal. Fayetteville, N. C. was in the hands of that State, and was occupied chiefly in repairing some arms, and in making up a small amounhaving been supplied with some machinery and facilities, and were producing the various munitions and equipments required: Augusta, Ga.; Charleston, S. C.; Fayetteville, N. C.; Richmond, Va.; Savannah, Ga.; Nashville, Tenn.; Memphis, Tenn.; Mount Vernon, Ala.; Baton Rouge, La.; Montgomery, Ala.; Little Rock, Ark.; and San Antonio, Texas—altogether eight arsenals and four depots. It would, of course, have been better, had it been practicable, to have condensed our work and to have had fewer plac
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Arsenals, workshops, foundries, etc. (search)
ratory and shops had been established at Richmond by the State, but none of the Southern arsenals were yet in a condition to do much work. The arsenal at Augusta, Ga., was directed to organize for the preparation of ammunition and the making of knapsacks, of which there were none wherewith to equip the troops now daily taking the field. The arsenal at Charleston and the depot at Savannah were occupied chiefly with local work. The arsenal at Baton Rouge was rapidly getting under way; and that at Mt. Vernon, Ala., was also being prepared for work. None of them had had facilities for the work usually done at an arsenal. Fayetteville, N. C. was in the hands of that State, and was occupied chiefly in repairing some arms, and in making up a small amount of small arm ammunition. Little artillery ammunition was being made up, except for local purposes, save at Richmond. Such was the general condition of supplies when the Government, quitting Montgomery, established itself at Richmond.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Progress of manufacture. (search)
rable quantities throughout the country by the laborious exertions of agents employed for this purpose. The battle-field of Bull Run was fully gleaned, and much lead collected. By the close of 1861 the following arsenals and depots were at work, having been supplied with some machinery and facilities, and were producing the various munitions and equipments required: Augusta, Ga.; Charleston, S. C.; Fayetteville, N. C.; Richmond, Va.; Savannah, Ga.; Nashville, Tenn.; Memphis, Tenn.; Mount Vernon, Ala.; Baton Rouge, La.; Montgomery, Ala.; Little Rock, Ark.; and San Antonio, Texas—altogether eight arsenals and four depots. It would, of course, have been better, had it been practicable, to have condensed our work and to have had fewer places of manufacture; but the country was deficient in the transportation which would have been required to place the raw material at a few arsenals. In this way only could we avail ourselves of local resources, both of labor and material. Thus by the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Work of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. (search)
station by the enemy. And there was not time for the removal of machinery and appliances from the places at which they were to be found. Hence the various temporary ordnance works grew up about existing foundries, machine shops, railroad repair shops, etc., and at the few small U. S. arsenals and ordnance depots. The chief of these in the early part of the war were at Richmond, Va., Fayetteville, N. C., Charleston, S. C., Augusta, Savannah and Macon, Ga., Nashville and Memphis, Tenn., Mount Vernon and Montgomery, Ala., New Orleans and Baton Rouge, La., Little Rock, Ark., and San Antonio, Tex. The events of the war before long compelled the abandonment of some of these, New Orleans and Nashville being the most important, and from time to time others were added to the list, as, for instance, Columbia, S. C., Atlanta and Columbus, Ga., Selma, Ala., and Jackson, Miss. Of these latter places Atlanta and Selma became most important. At these various places different lines of work were
322. Moultrie, Fort, S. C. (see also Fort Moultrie, S. C.): I., 24, 99; V., 119. Mound City, Ill., I., 185, 216; VI., 213; naval station at, VI., 215, 322; hospital at, VII., 320. Mound City,, U. S. S.: I., 215, 222, 237, 238, 362, 366; II., 194, 196; VI., 214, 220, 222, 314; VII., 319; IX., 271. Mount Elba, Ark., II., 350. Mount Jackson, Va., IV., 249. Mount McGregor, N. Y., IX., 112, 119; X., 40. Mount Sterling, Ky.: II., 332; III., 322. Mount Vernon, Ala., V., 156, 164. Mount Vernon, Ohio, VII., 204. Mount Vernon, Va., IX., 125. Mount Vernon,, U. S. S.: VI., 92, 308, 312, 316. Mount Zion, Mo., I., 356. Mower, J. A.: III., 347; X., 76, 77, 191, 224. Mudd, S. A., VII., 205. Mukden, Manchuria, I., 136; X., 126. Mulberry Island, Va., V., 306. Muldraughs Hill, Ky., IV., 150. Mulford, J. E.: VII., 101; Federal exchange officer, VII., 103, 172. Mullarkey, P., VIII., 362. Mu
is a telegram from Mobile, Friday: The United States arsenal and forts at Mobile, on the 4th, were taken by the Alabama troops. The forts contained 78,000 stand of arms, 1,500 boxes of powder, 300,000 rounds of musket cartridges, and other munitions of war. No resistance was made by those in charge of the forts and arsenals. Fort Morgan was taken the night before, and is now garrisoned by 200 men. On the same day 150 men took possession of the U. S. Arsenal at Mt. Vernon, Ala., by order of the Governor. A meeting of "Minute" ladies. A meeting of "matrons" took place in Burke county, Ga., on the 24th ult. As it is seldom an opportunity is given of recording the proceedings of the ladies in council, we give the following account of the meeting: After a short conversational preliminary, defining the mode of procedure, the assembly was organized by conferring the honor of the chair upon Mrs. Margaret Jones, and associating as Vice Presidents, Mrs.
e actually transferred under these orders, we know not; but we happen to have the official figures showing the number that went under the single order of 30th of May, 1860. The number, the kind of arms respectively, and their destination, transferred under this order dated May 30th, 1860, were as follows: Firnus's Muskets.Allured Muskets.Percue's Risles. Charleston (S. C.) Arsenal.9,2005,7202,000 North Carolina Arsenal15,4089,2,000 Augusta (Ge) Arsenal12,3807,6202,000 Mt. Vernon, Ala.9,2305,7202,000 Baton Rouge, La.18,82011,4202,000 The number of arms transferred to these arsenals under this order, being 114,868.--Thus the South was armed in spite of herself, in spite of her persistent blindness to the future, and obliviousness to the fate impending over her. It may suit the purposes of the North to condemn the act of Secretary Floyd as felonious and treasonable; it may gratify the malice of a few Southern citizens to own the impeachment; but that the circ
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