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The Daily Dispatch: June 5, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 6 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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f. The naval part of the operations consisted of,-- 1. In assembling the iron-clads at the Charleston bar, so as to cross at early daylight on the day named, to cover the attack of the troops, to prevent the arrival of reenforcements during that attack, and to engage the rebel batteries, particularly Fort Wagner. 2. To furnish a convoy for the column that was to ascend to Stono, cover its landing, and shell James's Island. 3. To guard the depots of the army at Hilton Head and at Seabrook during the withdrawal of the troops concentrated on Folly Island. I should here state that Mr. Ericsson had decided to increase the thicknesses of the pilot-houses of all the monitors, and add heavy circles of metal to the bases of the turrets and pilot-houses. The three at Port Royal were already in hand for this purpose, and some progress had been made. A part of my preparation consisted in putting a stop to the work, and having the vessels fitted temporarily for service. This was
. S. N. The more material trophies, two eleven-inch Dahlgren pieces, now in battery, were recovered, under the supervision of General Ripley, by the mechanical resources and energy of Mr. Adolphus Lacoste, employee of the district ordnance department, assisted by parties from the garrison of Fort Sumter, under command of Lieutenant S. C. Boyleston, and Lieutenants J. M. Rhett and K. Kemper, First South Carolina artillery. The enemy's land forces, collected in considerable strength on Seabrook Island, and in the transports in North Edisto River, and on Folly, Coles, and other islands about the mouth of the Stono River inlet, made no attempt to co-operate actively with the naval attack. In conclusion, I shall avail myself of the occasion to give, as my opinion, that the best, the easiest way to render Fort Sumter impregnable would be to arm, conformably to its original plan, both tiers of casemates and the barbette, with the heaviest guns, rifled or smooth-bore, that can be made.
command of the small force at my disposal, which consisted, as you are aware, of five companies of cavalry and two companies of sharpshooters, of Major Abney's battalion, who was in command, and to proceed with the least possible delay towards Coosawhatchie, to which point I was informed that a portion of the enemy's fleet were advancing. On arriving at Bee's Creek, still four miles from Coosawhatchie, Colonel Johnson was informed that a portion of the Abolition forces were landing at Seabrook's Island, in his rear, a point indicating an attack upon this place. To meet this he had to divide his command, and put three companies in the vicinity of Bee's Creek Hill. This information was subsequently ascertained to be incorrect, but too late to make use of these forces in the defence of Coosawhatchie. Proceeding with three companies of cavalry towards that point, upon arriving within two miles of it he ascertained that the enemy had already landed from a gunboat and barge lying a li
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence of Charleston from July 1st to July 10th, 1864. (search)
a sharp skirmish drove in our pickets and captured two field-pieces. At the same tine two monitors and several gunboats steamed up the Stone river above Leganville, and opened a heavy fire on our works. Hatch's and Saxton's brigades located on Seabrook's island on the morning of the 2d, and Berney's sailed up the north Edisto and landed at White Point. All of my available force at hand was immediately concentrated on James' island, and I ordered the First regiment Georgia regulars, three hueek a battery supported by a platoon of cavalry which General Robertson had placed there, and after an hour or two of skirmishing, Berney fell back to White Point, re-embarked and rejoined Hatch and Saxton, who, in the meantime, had crossed from Seabrook's to John's island, and moved up towards Charleston. Our very small force (a thin picket line) on John's island retired skirmishing, and on the 7th repulsed a vigorous effort to drive them off, inflicting on the enemy comparatively heavy loss.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Ocean Pond, Florida. (search)
pation, doubtless, of my attempt to reinforce Finnegan, made a strong demonstration on Johns's island. Though assured of the purpose of this movement, it assumed, however, so serious a form as to compel me to divert, temporarily, General Colquitt's and three and a half regiments of his brigade, to reinforce General Wise, then confronted by at least two brigades of the enemy (about four thousand five hundred strong), pushed forward in advance of the Haulover or bridgeway between Johns's and Seabrook's island,s and in addition several regiments of infantry were detached from Sullivan's and James's islands to be in readiness for the development of the enemy's purposes. On the night of the 11th ultimo I ordered all our batteries bearing on Morris island to open a heavy simultaneous fire on that portion, as if a cover for an assault, and with the hope of forcing the enemy to withdraw from Johns's island to the protection of his own works. This stratagem seems to have produced the desir
utposts of the enemy in his front had been much increased in strength. General Hagood reports them to be occupying Seabrook's Island, with at least 2500 infantry. They are erecting fortifications at that point, as also on Folly Island, which is liorder to detach the last division was received I had organized and put in motion an expedition against the enemy, on Seabrook Island, in support of a naval operation, the object of which is to destroy the ironclads, with the torpedo-boat contrivancend of the Department of the South. The Federal forces were then in possession of Folly Island, north of the Stono; Seabrook Island, on the North Edisto; St. Helena Island, Port Royal Island, Hilton Head Island, Tybee Islands, Fort Pulaski, Ossabawtant; his troops hold the same positions as heretofore, and apparently in the same force—a brigade on Folly, one on Seabrook's Island, and the balance on the islands about Port Royal. One of the monitors is at Hilton Head, and five are still in the
g Savannah Railroad. Shall await further orders. Enemy still occupies in force Folly and Seabrook's islands, also Port Royal. To reduce this command further might become disastrous. On the 4th d strength yesterday of enemy's outposts in his vicinity. Hagood reports 2500 infantry on Seabrook's Island fortifying; five monitors still there. Enemy in force on Folly Island, actively erecting is front had been much increased in strength. General Hagood reports them to be occupying Seabrook's Island with at least 2500 infantry. They are erecting fortifications at that point, as also on F same positions as heretofore, and apparently in the same force—a brigade on Folly, one on Seabrook's Island, and the balance on the islands about Port Royal. One of the monitors is at Hilton Head, ae of the attack on Charleston, in the beginning of April, the enemy occupied Big Folly and Seabrook's islands in force, estimated at one or two brigades, before the 10th of July a considerable number
tion, doubtless, of my attempt to reinforce Finegan, made a strong demonstration on John's Island. Though assured of the purpose of this movement, it assumed, however, so serious a form as to compel me to divert, temporarily, General Colquitt and three and a half regiments of his brigade, to reinforce General Wise, then confronted by at least two brigades of the enemy (about four thousand five hundred strong), pushed forward in advance of the Haulover, or bridge-way between John's and Seabrook's islands, and in addition several regiments of infantry were detached from Sullivan's and James islands, to be in readiness for the development of the enemy's purposes. On the night of the 11th ultimo I ordered all our batteries bearing on Morris Island to open a heavy simultaneous fire on that portion, as if a cover for an assault, and with the hope of forcing the enemy to withdraw from John's Island to the protection of his own works. This stratagem seems to have produced the desired effe
Pocotaligo, Oct. 22d, 1862. Brig.-Genl. Jordan: Thirteen of enemy's vessels are off Mackay's Point. Two companies have already landed. Also landing at Seabrook's Island. W. S. Walker, Col. Comdg. Charleston, S. C., Oct. 22d, 1862. General,—Our line has failed south of Pocotaligo. The operator at that place supposes tht S. C. Boyleston and Lieutenants J. M. Rhett and K. Kemper, First South Carolina Artillery. The enemy's land-forces, collected in considerable strength on Seabrook Island, and in the transports in North Edisto River, and on Folly, Cole's, and other islands about the mouth of the Stono River inlet, made no attempt to cooper-ate rtillery officer, as you will remember, of the regular service; his command is certainly not less than six regiments. There is about a brigade of 2000 men on Seabrook Island, North Edisto. Nothing is positively known of the enemy's land-forces at Hilton Head. Respectfully, your obdt. servt., G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, South Carolina, 1862 (search)
11: Reconn. up Savannah River to Elba IslandNEW HAMPSHIRE--3rd Infantry. March 13: Skirmish, Mattis PlantationPENNSYLVANIA--45th Infantry (Detachment). March 19-24: Expedition to May River and operations near BlufftonNEW HAMPSHIRE--3rd Infantry. RHODE ISLAND--3d Arty. (Detachment). March 20: Affair, BuckinghamNEW HAMPSHIRE--3rd Infantry. March 29: Action, Edisto IslandPENNSYLVANIA--55th Infantry. April 5: Occupation of Edisto IslandNEW HAMPSHIRE--3rd Infantry. April 14: Reconn. on Seabrook IslandNEW HAMPSHIRE--3rd Infantry. April 19: Skirmish, Edisto IslandNEW HAMPSHIRE--3rd Infantry. PENNSYLVANIA--55th Infantry, and crew of U. S. Str, "Crusader," Union loss, 3 wounded. May 20: Bombardment of Cole's IslandU. S. Gunboat. May 22: Expedition to John's Island(No reports.) May 25: Affair between James and Dixon's IslandsU. S. Gunboat. May 29: Skirmish, PocotaligoMASSACHUSETTS--1st Cavalry (Detachment). MICHIGAN--8th Infantry (1 Co.). NEW YORK--79th Infantry (1 Co.). PENNSYLVANIA
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