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Appointments by Lincoln. --James Watson Webb, of New York, to be Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States to Brazil. Thomas H. Nelson, of Indiana, to be Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States to Chill. Allen A. Burton, of Kentucky, to be Minister Resident of the United States to Bogota. George E. Wiss, of Maryland, to be Consul of the United States at Amsterdam. Timothy C. Smith, of Vermont, to be Consul of the United States at Odessa. Charles L. Bernays, of Missouri, to be Consul of the United States at Zurich. John D. Arnold, of Illinois, to be Consul of the United States at St. Petersburg. John H. Peters, of South Carolina, to be Consul of the United States at Tunis. Henry W. Lord, of Michigan, to be Consul of the United States at Manchester, Joseph & Nunes, of California, to be Commercial Agent of the United States at La Fas, Lower California.
nd the South Pacific republics. Her advices from California have been anticipated by the overland express. In New Granada it would appear the government continues to triumph, though the news is, as usual, conflicting. Dates from Santa Martha are to the 4th inst. It had been besieged by the rebels for eleven days preceding that date, and considerable damage was done by the bombardment. General Jones, United States Minister to New Granada, was detained there, being unable to proceed to Bogota. All the States except those in Mosquera's interest, had voted for President. So far, Arboleda has a majority over General Herran. From the South Pacific we learn that President Castilla of Peru had a narrow escape from assassination in Lima on November 23d. There is nothing new about the United States claims. Efforts are to be made to raise the frigate Callao, which was sunk off the port of that name some time last fall. The new revised constitution has been promulgated. Bolivia h
th Star. over one million in treasure — success of the revolution in New Grenada New York, Aug. 23. --The steamer North Star has arrived from Aspinwall in safety, with $1,176,000 in treasure, from California. On her outward passage the North Star discovered the British war-steamer Driver ashore on Miragoane roof, and offered to tow her off, but found she had bliged, and that nearly everything had been taken out of her. Her crew occupied tents on shore. The North Star passed the steamer Northern on the 18th, and the Champion on the 22d. A boat from "Driver" boarded the Northern Star on her return trip and reported that the U. S. Corvette Richmond passed there on the 18th. Advices from New Grenada state that Gen. Mosquera had taken Bogota and routed the Government forces and proclaimed himself provisional President of New Grenada.--Generals Espina, Pocada, Paris, and various officials, were taken prisoners. The President and Cabinet had fled.
Later from California.arrival of the steamer Northern light. more Gold from California--Probability of the capture of the Sumter, &c. New York, Dec. 4 --The steamer Northern Light, from Aspinwall, has arrived, bringing $870,000 in treasure from California. Captain Tinklepaugh reports that information had been received at Aspinwall that the privateer Sumter was at Martinique November 9th, and that the United States gun-boat Iroquois was within three hours sail of her. Advices from Cartagena state that Gen. Cassal has been defeated, and that the Archbishop of Bogota has been expelled by Gen. Mosquera, and that the latter's forces occupied a part of Antioquia. Deplorable accounts from Bolivia have been received. The Commander General at Lapaz had ordered the execution of 200 persons engaged in the recent revolutionary movements there. Among those executed were ex-President Cerders, Gen. Hermosa, a number of priests, and four colonels.
shells thrown at Col. Geary's camp yesterday were clearly intended to cover the above movement. At half-past 1 o'clock it is reported the rebels have destroyed Dam No. 5. No loss on our side. Arrest of George W. Jones, late Minister to Bogota. The New York Herald, of the 21st instant, says: George W. Jones, ex-United States Senator of lowa, and late Minister to Bogota, was taken into custody yesterday morning, at the instance of Secretary Seward, and sent to Fort Lafayette, Bogota, was taken into custody yesterday morning, at the instance of Secretary Seward, and sent to Fort Lafayette, on suspicion of treason. The prisoner expresses great surprise at his arrest, and says he was on the most confidential terms with Mr. Seward, and had enjoyed a long conversation with him no longer ago than Thursday last, the day before his arrest. He had gone to Washington to settle his accounts with the Government, and, having concluded his business matters, he started for New York by the evening train on Thursday. Immediately on the arrival of the cars at Jersey City yesterday morning t
Whi-Minister Jonas was arrested --Our readers have already been apprised of the fact that ex-Minister Jones, of Iowa recently returned from Bogota, was arrested several days since, in New York, by order of Mr. Seward, but upon what particular charge was not stated. We since learn, however, from the Washington correspondent of the New York Times, that the charge upon which Mr. Jones was arrested, "was that of writing letters from Bogota to Jeff. Davis, proffering the utmost anxiety for thex-Minister Jones, of Iowa recently returned from Bogota, was arrested several days since, in New York, by order of Mr. Seward, but upon what particular charge was not stated. We since learn, however, from the Washington correspondent of the New York Times, that the charge upon which Mr. Jones was arrested, "was that of writing letters from Bogota to Jeff. Davis, proffering the utmost anxiety for the success of the disunion movement, and promising to join him on his return from New Grenada."
Dead. --The Lynchburg, Va., papers announce the death of Wm. M. Blackford, of that city. The Republican says of him: Mr. Blackford entered public life, many years ago, as the editor of the Fredericksburg Herald, an old and popular political journal, with whose fortune he was for a long time connected. During John Tyler's Administration he was appointed to the honorable position of Charge d'affaires of the United States to Bogota, which position he filled with credit to himself for four years. In 1845 he removed to this city, and became the editor of the Lynchburg Virginian, which he conducted until 1849, when he was made Postmaster of this city under the Administration of Millard Fillmore.--When he retired from that position in 1853, he was elected Cashier of the Exchange Bank of this city, which position he occupied at the time of his death. Some months ago the Secretary of the treasury made him chief of the Confederate Depositary of this city.
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