Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for The Hague (Netherlands) or search for The Hague (Netherlands) in all documents.

Your search returned 52 results in 37 document sections:

1 2 3 4
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Greek fire, (search)
Greek fire, A combustible composition (unknown, thought to have been principally naphtha) invented by Callinicus, an engineer of Heliopolis, in Syria, in the seventh century, and used by the Greek emperors. A so-called Greek fire, probably a solution of phosphorus in bisulphide of carbon, was employed at the siege of Charleston, S. C., in 1863. The use of all such substances in war is now prohibited, under a decision of the International Peace Conference at The Hague in 1889.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Holland. (search)
he United States on April 19, 1782. This was brought about by the energetic application of John Adams, who, on the capture of Henry Laurens (q. v.), was sent to The Hague as minister plenipotentiary to the States-General, or government, of Holland. His special mission was to solicit a loan, but he was clothed with full powers to Oct. 8, 1782); he also made a successful application for a loan, which was a seasonable aid for the exhausted treasury of the colonies. The treaty was signed at The Hague by John Adams and the representatives of the Netherlands, and was ratified in January, 1783. Late in 1780 Great Britain, satisfied that the Netherlands would been in progress some time. On Dec. 20 King George declared war against Holland. Before the declaration had been promulgated, and while efforts were making at The Hague to conciliate England and avoid war, British cruisers pounced upon and captured 200 unsuspecting merchant vessels laden with cargoes of the aggregate value of $5
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), International law, (search)
ther, and in these congresses the United States has occupied a conspicuous place. The Association for the Reform and Codification of the Law of Nations held its first session in Brussels, Oct. 10, 1873, and subsequent ones were held in Geneva, The Hague, Bremen, Antwerp, Frankfort, London, Berne, Cologne, Turin, and Milan. An Institute of International Law was organized in Ghent in 1873, and has since held numerous sessions in various cities of Europe, The most conspicuous action of the natiot. 10, 1873, and subsequent ones were held in Geneva, The Hague, Bremen, Antwerp, Frankfort, London, Berne, Cologne, Turin, and Milan. An Institute of International Law was organized in Ghent in 1873, and has since held numerous sessions in various cities of Europe, The most conspicuous action of the nations concerning the abolition of international hostilities was taken in the Peace Conference at The Hague, in 1899, to which the United States was also a party. See codes; field, David Dudley.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lee, Charles 1731- (search)
ns, the Americans had unbounded confidence in Lee, and many were in favor of making him commander-in-chief of the Continental army at the time Washington was appointed. Indeed, he expected the honor, and was disappointed and surprised because he did not receive it. He had been in military training from his boyhood, and represented himself as well versed in the science of war. He was better understood in England. From what I know of him. wrote Sir Joseph Yorke, then British minister at The Hague, he is the worst present which could be made to any army. And so he proved to the Americans. He was selfish in the extreme. He had left the English army because he saw no chance of being provided for at home. Soured against his government, he had sought employment anywhere as a mere military adventurer. He venerated England, and declared it to be wretchedness itself, not being able to herd with the class of men [the English] to which he had been accustomed from infancy. He was contin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lee, William 1737-1795 (search)
lomatist; born in Stratford, Va., in 1737: brother of Richard Henry and Arthur; was agent for Virginia in London, and became a merchant there. The city of London being overwhelmingly Whig in politics, William Lee was elected sheriff of that city and Middlesex county in 1773. In 1775 he was chosen alderman, but on the breaking out of the war in America retired to France. Congress appointed him commercial agent at Nantes at the beginning of 1777, and he was afterwards American minister at The Hague. Mr. Lee was also agent in Berlin and Vienna, but was recalled in 1779. In 1778 Jan de Neufville, an Amsterdam merchant, procured a loan to the Americans from Holland, through his house, and, to negotiate for it, gained permission of the burgomasters of Amsterdam to meet Lee at Aix-la-Chapelle. There they arranged terms for a commercial convention proper to be entered into between the two republics. When Lee communicated this project to the American commissioners at Paris, they (having
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Low, Seth 1850- (search)
College in 1870; entered his father's mercantile house, and in 1875 became a member of the Seth low firm, and shortly after was elected a member of the Chamber of Commerce. Later he established the Brooklyn Bureau of Charities. In 1881 and 1883 he was elected mayor of Brooklyn. Mr. Low was chosen president of Columbia College in 1890. In 1899 President McKinley appointed him one of the United States delegates to the Universal Peace Conference called by the Czar of Russia and held at The Hague, Netherlands, that year. Since his accession to the presidency of Columbia University he has been exceedingly liberal in promoting its welfare. In 1895 he offered to erect a grand university library at his own expense. This building by the time of its completion had cost him about $1,200,000. In honor of his munificence, the trustees established twelve scholarships for Brooklyn boys and twelve in Barnard College for Brooklyn girls. In 1897 Mr. Low was the candidate of the Citizens' Un
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mahan, Alfred Taylor 1840- (search)
885. After the Civil War he served in the South Atlantic, Pacific, Asiatic, and European squadrons. During 1886-93 he was president of the Naval War College, at Newport, R. I.; in 1893-96 was in command of the United States protected cruiser Chicago; and was retired at his own request, Nov. 17, 1896. During the war with Spain he was recalled to active service and made a member of the naval advisory board, and in 1899 President McKinley appointed him a delegate to the peace conference at The Hague. Captain Mahan is known the world over for his publications on naval subjects, and particularly on naval strategy. He was dined by Queen Victoria; honored with the degree of Ll.D. by Cambridge, Oxford, and McGill universities; and had his Influence of sea power in history translated by the German Naval Department and supplied to all the public libraries, schools, and government institutions in the German Empire. Besides a large number of review and magazine articles, he has published T
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Murray, William Vans 1762-1803 (search)
Murray, William Vans 1762-1803 Diplomatist; born in Cambridge, Md., in 1762; received a classical education; and after the peace in 1783 studied law in the Temple, London; returned about 1785, practised law, served in his State legislature, and was in Congress from 1791 to 1797. He was an eloquent speaker and a keen diplomatist; was appointed by Washington minister to the Batavian Republic, and by Adams sole envoy extraordinary to the French Republic. Ellsworth and Davie afterwards joined him. He was instrumental in the arrangement of the convention signed in Paris in September, 1800, between America and France, and then returned to his mission at The Hague. He died in Cambridge, Dec. 11, 1803.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Neutrality. (search)
h contraband goods whose value did not exceed threefourths of the whole cargo. From that time until the beginning of 1780 the insolence of British cruisers and the tone of the British ministers offended the Northern powers. The tone was often insulting. When the Dutch, said Lord North, say We maritime powers, it reminds me of the cobbler who lived next door to the lord mayor, and used to say, My neighbor and I. Official language was often equally offensive. The British minister at The Hague said, For the present, treaty or no treaty, England will not suffer materials for ship-building to be taken by the Dutch to any French port. A similar tone was indulged towards the other powers, excepting Russia The shrewd Catharine, perceiving the commercial interests of her realm to be involved in the maintenance of the neutral rights of others, after long coquetting with Great Britain, assumed the attitude of defender of those rights before all the world. Early in March, 1780, she i
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Netherland. (search)
New Netherland. To the Binnenhof, at The Hague, repaired deputies from the Amsterdam company of merchants and traders to have an audience with the States-General of Holland, to solicit a Seal of New Netherland. charter for the region in America which the discoveries of Henry Hudson had revealed to the world. That was in 1614 They sent twelve high and mighty lords, among them the noble John of Barneveld. The deputies spread a map before them, told them of the adventures of their agents in the region of the Hudson River, the heavy expenses they had incurred, and the risks they ran without some legal power to act in defence. Their prayer was heard, State-House in New York. and a charter, bearing date Oct. 11, 1614, was granted, in which the country was named New Netherland. This was before the incorporation of the Dutch West India Company. In 1623, New Netherland was made a province or county of Holland, and the States-General granted it the armorial distinction of a cou
1 2 3 4