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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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e hospitality of my friend Tremlett, at Belsize Park, in London. Here we arranged for a visit, of a few weeks, to the continent, and especially to the Swiss mountains, which was carried out in due time. One other gentleman, an amiable and accomplished sister of my friend Tremlett, and two other ladies, connections or friends of the family, accompanied us. We were absent six weeks; landing at Ostend, passing hurriedly through Belgium—not forgetting, however, to visit the battle-field of Waterloo—stopping a few days at Spa, for the benefit of the waters, and then passing on to the Rhine; up that beautiful and historic river to Mayence, and thence to the Swiss lakes—drawing the first long breath at Geneva, where we rested a few days. There, reader! I have given you my European tour in a single paragraph; and as I am writing of the sea, and of war, and not of the land, or of peace, this is all the space I can appropriate to it. I must be permitted, however, to say of my friend Trem<
gable testimony Slavery erected in Kansas Apologies for the Crime the Apology tyrannical Apology Imbecile Apology absurd remedies proposed Remedy of tyranny--of Folly Remedy of Civil war Usurpation must be overthrown reaching the Goal the American President guilty I. Compared with the narrow field where he had hitherto carried on the battle, the arena that was to witness his future struggles was as the two days skirmishing of Ligny and Quatre Bras, to the final overthrow at Waterloo. The scene and its surroundings Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe has so finely sketched, it were a pity not to let the reader carry it on his fancy as he goes with the champions into the heat of the conflict: And now came the great battle of the Fugitive Slave Law. The sorceress slavery meditated a grand coup daetat that should found a Southern slave empire, and shake off the troublesome North, and to that intent her agents concocted a statute so insulting to Northern honor, so needlessly
I. Compared with the narrow field where he had hitherto carried on the battle, the arena that was to witness his future struggles was as the two days skirmishing of Ligny and Quatre Bras, to the final overthrow at Waterloo. The scene and its surroundings Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe has so finely sketched, it were a pity not to let the reader carry it on his fancy as he goes with the champions into the heat of the conflict: And now came the great battle of the Fugitive Slave Law. The sorceress slavery meditated a grand coup daetat that should found a Southern slave empire, and shake off the troublesome North, and to that intent her agents concocted a statute so insulting to Northern honor, so needlessly offensive in its provisions, so derisive of what were understood to be its religious convictions and humane sentiments, that it was thought verily, The North never will submit to this, and we shall make here the breaking point. Then arose Daniel Webster, that lost Archangel
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
ook back upon this visit, it seems as if I were recollecting some of the descriptions of parties in country-houses in English novels, so much truer are they to nature than is generally imagined. It was a very pleasant party, whose chief attraction and amusement was music. . . . Sir Francis Doyle, an old officer, and very intelligent gentleman, who has read much and seen much, was uniformly agreeable, and so was Lord Arthur Hill, one of the best cavalry officers in the service, who fought at Waterloo in the famous regiment of the Scotch Grays, and now commands it, but whose obvious character here was only bonhomie, and easy careless happiness. . . . . Our host himself, who has been entertaining company in this way these thirty years, has much knowledge of the world, great kindness, and a good deal of amusing anecdote. His establishment was perfect for its purposes, in comforts and luxuries, and there was an exactness in the mode of carrying it on that was quite remarkable. We left W
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 23: (search)
e of death, and two others liable to imprisonment for life if they could be found within the grasp of Austrian power. Waterloo.— Certainly we did not pass six days in Brussels without giving one of them to Waterloo, which is only nine miles off; aWaterloo, which is only nine miles off; and I must needs say that I have seldom passed one of the sort in a manner so entirely satisfactory. It was all plain; the battle, the positions, the movements, everything; and all quite intelligible at a single glance, from the top of the vast moundcould fall back no farther. Second. Immediately on emerging from the forest, we came upon the poor little village of Waterloo, with its rather plain church. It was here the Duke of Wellington fixed his headquarters during the night of the 17th; bridges and the Neck, are seen from the top of our State House in Boston. . . . . The great thing for which you go to Waterloo you certainly obtain, that is, a perfectly clear and satisfactory idea of the battle; and not of the battle merely, but
59, 95, 122; men of, II., 164, 165; V., 58, 63, 64, 72, 74; VIII., 119, 125, 127, 150; officers of, IX., 329, 343. Washington Grays, N. Y. (see New York Eighth State Militia). Washington Light Infantry of Charleston, S. C.: VIII., 115, 117, 167. Wassaw Sound, Ga.: I., 361; II., 336; VI., 38, 236, 271, 318. Water cart Viii., 213. Water transportation: in Peninsula campaign, VIII., 50. Water Witch,, U. S. S., VI., 189, 312, 320. Waterhouse, R., X., 315. Waterloo, Belgium: battle of: II., 272; X., 120. 122, 124, 140. Waterloo bridge, Va.: II., 42; skirmish at, II., :122. Waterproof, La., II., 350. Watertown, Mass., V., 144. Watervliet, West Troy, N. Y. : V., 141; arsenal at, V., 154; IX., 219. Watie, Stand Cherokee Indian, I., 362; leader at Pea Ridge, X., 287. Watkins' Park, Nashville, Tenn. , V., 65. Watmough, P. G., VI., 273. Watson, 1, VI., 233. Watterson. H.: IX., 306; X., 21, 24. Watts, N. G.,
ring. It would have become totally demoralized, and could not have been rallied to the colors. Napoleon invaded Belgium in 1815 with 122,400 men. He carried into the battle of Waterloo the 2d and 5th corps of the French army, numbering, after their losses in the battles of Ligny and Lee Quatre Bras, 68,650 men. Of the rest 12,000 had been put hors de combat by the battles above mentioned, 34,500 were with Grouchy and did not come up, and 8,000 were left on the field of Ligny. The rout of Waterloo was the most completes recorded in modern history. Yet the French lost only 29,000 men--4,000 less than the Yankees affirm that Lee lost in the battle of Gettysburg, while it is certain that Lee did not carry 120,000 with him into Pennsylvania. Like most habitual liars, these Yankees prove too much. If they killed and wounded such a number of men for Lee as they represent, they must have been the most miserable of all cowards to let him get off. But the Yankee army were not cowards.
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