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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 1 1 Browse Search
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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
Chapter 3: Berkshire County. Berkshire is the most westerly county in the Commonwealth. It is bounded north by Bennington County, Vermont; west by Rensselaer and Columbia Counties, New York; south by Litchfield County, Connecticut; and east bn River. There are several other railroads in the county, which centre at Pittsfield. There are thirty-one towns in Berkshire, but no city. The entire population in 1860 was 55,120, and in 1865 it was 56,960, an increase in five years of only 1ns made by the selectmen in 1866 from all the towns in the county, it appears that the whole number of men furnished by Berkshire for the war was five thousand three hundred and fifty-six, which is not far from the exact number required to be furniwar, with the exception of Mount Washington and Tyringham, and these had the exact number required of them. No town in Berkshire, nor in the State, fell short of its contingent. The aggregate expenditure of all the towns in the county on account
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The foundation of the labor movement (1871) (search)
y millions of human beings in what you call Christendom, and two hundred millions of them don't have enough to eat from January to December. I won't ask for culture, for opportunities for education, for travel, for society; but two hundred millions of men gathered under Christendom don't have even enough to eat. A hundred thousand men in the city of New York live in dwellings that a rich man would n't let his horse stay in a day. But that is n't anything. You should go up to beautiful Berkshire with me, into the factories there. It shall be the day after a Presidential election. I will go with you into a counting-room,--four hundred employees. The partners are sitting down, the day after a Presidential election. They take the list of workmen, and sift them out; and every man that has not voted the ticket they wanted is thrown out to starve just as if he were cattle. That's Christian civilization! that's Massachusetts! I don't like that significant fact. I leap from that t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
cross the Connecticut River, pass through what is called the Gap in the White Mountains to Portland, Me., and thence to Boston; then, on the Western Railroad, to Berkshire, in the western part of Massachusetts; again to Trenton Falls (you will not miss another sight of them); thence back to the North River; and, descending the rived hear it. This will be a literary festival, characteristic of the country, and everybody will be glad to see you. I am going, for a few days, among the hills of Berkshire with my sisters; but I shall always be within hail from Boston. Good-night. As ever, ever yours, Charles Sumner. To Professor Mittermaier, Heidelberg. Bfail to enjoy Catskill and West Point. They are both inexpressibly fine. I doubt if Theodore Sedgwick is at Stockbridge now. I wish you could see the hills of Berkshire, and the green shade which embowers the railroad between Pittsfield and Springfield; then the valley of the Connecticut,—at least, as far as Northampton, a lovel
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
While at Lenox as the guest of Samuel G. Ward, he drove to Stockbridge and passed the day at Charles Sedgwick's, Charles Sedgwick was clerk of the courts of Berkshire. He died in 1856, at the age of sixty-four. His father, Judge Sedgwick, who died in 1813, had three other sons,—Theodore, of Stockbridge, who died in 1839; Robth and sing ballads. While here he was gladdened by the arrival of Dr. Howe, who had been in Europe sixteen months, and who came at once to Pittsfield. Leaving Berkshire with strength renewed, he passed a few days in New York, where he met Crawford,—for the first time since their parting in Rome; and late in September became his said he was most pleasantly disappointed by the result of the examination, and that his anxiety was removed. So when you see me, invigorated by the breezes of Berkshire and the balmy breaths of Newport, expect to find me in my pristine strength, rejoicing in your return, looking with joy upon all the signs of your happiness.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Wednesday fore, Aug. 28. (search)
he might satisfy himself and you. The result of his examination has restored my confidence in myself. He thought that no physician could be confident that there was any thing on my lungs; if there was any thing it was very slight, and said he should not have suspected it if some of my family were not afflicted with poor lungs. He said he was most pleasantly disappointed by the result of the examination, and that his anxiety was removed. So when you see me, invigorated by the breezes of Berkshire and the balmy breaths of Newport, expect to find me in my pristine strength, rejoicing in your return, looking with joy upon all the signs of your happiness. I am vexed that I have filled this letter with so much about myself. It is a perpetual ego. When I read your arrival in the newspaper, I shall send you a note of my health and whereabouts. Perhaps then you will find time to cheer me with a letter. My sister Mary still lingers at Waltham, enjoying occasional drives, but fading
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 27: services for education.—prison discipline.—Correspondence.— January to July, 1845.—age, 34. (search)
mner relative to a bequest for a charity. Mann's Life, p. 246. and supported him in his controversy with the Boston schoolmasters upon points of school discipline. He was one of the group of friends whom Mr. Mann called together for counsel, and in these conferences favored moderation in dealing with opponents. At one of these meetings, held in Sept. 1844, Dr. Howe, Hillard, Edward G. Loring, George B. Emerson, and Dr. Fisher were present. One of them wrote to Sumner, who was then in Berkshire, that his cool judgment and warm sympathy were missed. He reviewed at length, in the Advertiser, March 12 and 21, 1844. Mr. Mann's report on European systems of education, warmly commending it, with a gentle criticism of an implied depreciation of classical studies which it seemed to contain. With a view of sustaining the cause, he accepted the nomination of a Whig caucus, in Dec. 1844, as one of the two members of the School Committee to which Ward Four, where he lived, was entitled.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1851. (search)
ar to be one of emancipation, and be supported as now by the great mass of Northern men. . . . . The number of people about here, where they ought to be and probably are as well educated and intelligent as in most parts of the South, who can't read, is really astounding; and I should need to have great faith in a person's accuracy to believe what I have seen, did he relate it to me,—not having seen it myself. I asked a man to-day,—of about the mental calibre by nature of our sensible Berkshire farmers,—how it was possible that he and so many others were so ignorant, and that their children were brought up in the same way. He said they never had a chance to get learning, —that there were no free schools, and they could not afford to send their children to any others. I asked if he knew many people about here who could read, and he answered, There a'n't many sure. But I did not need his assurance of the fact; for though the country is not thickly settled, and I only see those w
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
, Geo. T. Mrs. T. sends kindest regards, and will shortly prepare a pastoral for you. My daughter, too, desires to be remembered. Piccinina talks of you. We all want to see you. My next, I suppose, will be from the Classic Hole,—Jeremiah's Patmos,—a more euphuistical combination of four words than has been made since the days of Lily. I am vain of it. You will probably gather from the bucolic entusimuzy of my letter that I never was in this part of the world before. It is so. All Berkshire is new to me; but I think we shall come here often hereafter. It is more agreeable, as well as more picturesque, than I expected. To William H. Prescott, Nahant. Woods' Hole, Sunday, August 14, 1842. my dear William,—you will be glad to hear that the rest of your manuscript is safe. Manuscript of the Conquest of Mexico. . . . . We were just ready for it, having, a few hours before it came, reached the antepenultimate chapter of the first portion of the manuscript. Last night, <
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
m the Glen, In the White Mountains. I have heard of you-until yesterday-only by accident. Our calculations for our tour in the Mountains were overrun by two days, so that, when we reached Gorham again, I had no time either to see Lady Head off for Quebec, or to stop a night in Portland and see you, both of which I much regretted. Since our nominal return to Boston, which was necessary to keep other engagements, we have been little at home. We made a visit directly to our kinsfolk in Berkshire, Hon. B. R. Curtis and his family. which had been promised three successive years; then we went to New York to buy carpets, missing Cogswell, or, as he pretends, avoiding him by a day; then we went to some friends on the North River; and now we are just come back from Savage's, Mr. James Savage's country-place at Lunenburg, in the northern part of Massachusetts. where we have been due since 1855. Of course the few intervening days at home have been busy enough. The practical res
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, James Peirce (search)
e of our great seats of learning, miscalled national, which are reserved for the exclusive benefit of the established church, must obviously have many prejudices to encounter and remove before he can obtain admittance on a footing of equality and intimacy among those who, having enjoyed privileges from which others are debarred, are often disposed, for that very reason, to look down on the scholarship which has not been acquired among themselves, From Cambridge he removed to Newbury, in Berkshire, where he seems to have been very eligibly situated with an attached and encouraging congregation. During his residence here, he distinguished himself by various publications on the controversy between the church and the dissenters. His first appearance on this arena was in reply to a Dr. Wells, a clergyman in Leicestershire, who had published A Letter to Mr. Donley, a dissenting minister, containing many unfounded statements and gross misrepresentations of the principles and character
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