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h vessels are moored on each side, or it may be fixed on an overhead traveling gantry. The works of the crane (Fig. 5653) are carried on a flatbot-tomed boat, which may be towed from place to place and moored by attachment to piles. The pile or other object to which the end of the boat opposite the derrick is fastened serves as a fulcrum to resist the strain of heavy weights, as well as to hold the boat in place. Steam Railway-crane. The steam-crane of the Royal Gunwharf at Chatham, England, is one of the largest and most powerful steamcranes in the world. While capable of lifting the 80-ton guns, it is under the control of one man. In its erection a bed of concrete 30 feet deep was first laid, to which the main framing is firmly screwed down with an intervening base-plate. On this base-plate is a centerpin or bolt, 12 inches diameter, on which the crane revolves. Two cast-iron rollers 3 feet diameter and 1 foot broad run in a roller-path, and by suitable gearing bet
ealthful vivacity of moral feeling on this subject that must electrify our paralyzed vitality. For this reason, therefore, I rejoice when I see minds like your lordship's turning to this subject; and I feel an intensity of emotion, as if I could say, Do not for Christ's sake let go; you know not what you may do. Your lordship will permit me to send you two of the most characteristic documents of the present struggle, written by two men who are, in their way, as eloquent for the slave as Chatham was for us in our hour of need. I am now preparing some additional notes to my book, in which I shall further confirm what I have said by facts and statistics, and in particular by extracts from the codes of slaveholding States, and the records of their courts. These are documents that cannot be disputed, and I pray your lordship to give them your attention. No disconnected facts can be so terrible as these legal decisions. They will soon appear in England. It is so far from being i
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
when ample justice has been done on our side, seek justice and peace from her. Be assured these would easily follow. Perhaps the same response might come from the Mexicans, that the Falerii sent to the Roman Senate, through Camillus: The Romans having preferred justice to conquest, have taught us to be satisfied with submission instead of liberty. That I may not seem to found these conclusions upon general principles of morals only, let me invoke the example of the Whigs of England, of Chatham, Camden, Burke, Fox and Sheridan, in their opposition to the war of our Revolution; denouncing it, at the outset, as unjust, and never, during its whole progress, failing to declare their condemnation of it; voting against supplies for its prosecution, and against thanks for the military services by which it was waged. Holding their example, as of the highest practical authority on the present question of political duty, and as particularly fit to be regarded by persons professing to be Wh
when ample justice has been done on our side, seek justice and peace from her. Be assured these would easily follow. Perhaps the same response might come from the Mexicans, that the Falerii sent to the Roman Senate, through Camillus: The Romans having preferred justice to conquest, have taught us to be satisfied with submission instead of liberty. That I may not seem to found these conclusions upon general principles of morals only, let me invoke the example of the Whigs of England, of Chatham, Camden, Burke, Fox and Sheridan, in their opposition to the war of our Revolution; denouncing it, at the outset, as unjust, and never, during its whole progress, failing to declare their condemnation of it; voting against supplies for its prosecution, and against thanks for the military services by which it was waged. Holding their example, as of the highest practical authority on the present question of political duty, and as particularly fit to be regarded by persons professing to be Wh
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
ishing there his permanent abode, he is in relationship, more or less intimate, with Mandeville, Paine, Priestley, Price, Adam Smith, Robertson, Hume, Joseph Banks, Bishop Watson, Bishop Shipley, Lord Kames, Lord Shelburne, Lord Howe, Burke, and Chatham. Among Frenchmen he numbers on his list of admiring friends Vergennes, Lafayette, Mirabeau, Turgot, Quesnay, La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt, Condorcet, Lavoisier, Buffon, D'Alembert, Robespierre, and Voltaire. It is absurd to speak of one who has temper, two years later to become the fieriest advocate of American independence. In disgrace with the Court, Franklin lingered in England to exhaust the last possibilities of amicable adjustment: petitioning the king, conferring with Burke and Chatham, and curiously arranging for secret negotiations with the go-betweens of the Ministry over the chessboard of Lord Howe's sister. He sailed from England in March, 1775, half-convinced that the Ministry were bent upon provoking an open rebellion.
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The scholar in a republic (1881). (search)
uch a despotism could exist without provoking the bloodiest resistance. I honor Nihilism, since it redeems human nature from the suspicion of being utterly vile, made up only of heartless oppressors and contented slaves. Every line in our history, every interest of civilization, bids us rejoice when the tyrant grows pale and the slave rebellious. We cannot but pity the suffering of any human being, however richly deserved; but such pity must not confuse our moral sense. Humanity gains. Chatham rejoiced when our fathers rebelled. For every single reason they alleged, Russia counts a hundred, each one ten times bitterer than any Hancock or Adams could give. Sam Johnson's standing toast in Oxford port was, Success to the first insurrection of slaves in Jamaica, --a sentiment Southey echoed. Eschew cant, said that old moralist. But of all the cants that are canted in this canting world, though the cant of piety may be the worst, the cant of Americans bewailing Russian Nihilism is
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
'T is natural he should love a hit; A gentleman, withal, and scholar, Only base things excite his choler, And then his satire's keen and thin As the lithe blade of Saladin. Good letters are a gift apart, And his are gems of Flemish art, True offspring of the fireside Muse, Not a chip-gathering of news Like a new hopfield which is all poles, But of one blood with Horace Walpole's. There, with one hand behind his back, Stands Phillips buttoned in a sack, W. Phillips. Our Attic orator, our Chatham; Old fogies, when he lightens at 'em, Shrivel like leaves; to him 't is granted Always to say the word that's wanted, So that he seems but speaking clearer The tiptoe thought of every hearer; Each flash his brooding heart lets fall Fires what's combustible in all, And sends the applauses bursting in Like an exploded magazine. His eloquence no frothy show, The gutter's street-polluted flow, No Mississippi's yellow flood Whose shoalness can't be seen for mud;— So simply clear, serenely deep,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
d speech against employing Indians, Speech of Nov. 18, 1777, in reply to Lord Suffolk, who had justified the use of all the means which God and Nature put into our hands. Goodrich's Select British Eloquence, p. 138. Lord Bute had in his possession letters from Chatham, when William Pitt, in which he boasted of employing Indians successfully, and exclaimed, Sing lo Poean! by means of Indians we have got the trick. Brougham, you know, is the author of the article in the last Edinburgh on Chatham. July, 1838, Vol. LXVII. pp. 436-460, Character of Lord Chatham. He spoke of the article at table this morning, and seemed to be quite interested in the character of that statesman. He thought that the authorship of Junius would never be discovered, and said that Horne Tooke said the author must have been a man in office, and a damned rascal. The Duke of Gloucester, pleased with his success in extracting the above affair of Necker from Wilberforce, at the same table turned round to Lo
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
clay Perkins & Co. Miss Thrale is of course no longer young. She is, in fact, eighty-seven years old, but she is a stout, easy, comfortable old lady, full of good works and alms, and one who, as she has no love for books,--or very little,—does not care to talk about Dr. Johnson, and still less about her mother. But her cottage and grounds are in excellent taste, and well become the character and position of their possessor, who is much liked through all the country side. We returned by Chatham's drive, as it is called, a road through the highest part of the park, two or three miles long, which Lord Chatham advised to be cut, when he occupied Chevening in 1769. It proves him to have been a man of excellent taste, for the view from it is one of the finest I know of the sort . . . . . Lord Chatham said he thought it the finest view in the kingdom. I suppose it may be the finest view of an approach to such a mansion. . . . . One or two neighbors were invited to dinner and were p
at which we will arrive, and the hour in time. Yours Truly, U. S. Grant. Gen. A. Badeau. Letter no. Twenty-two. This note was written at my consular office, where General Grant called to see me, and not finding me there scribbled these lines on my official paper. I had invited him and Mrs. Grant to a little box I occupied eight or ten miles from London. He was staying at the Bristol Hotel. Sir Edward Watkins was the Chairman (President as Americans call it), of the London, Chatham & Dover Railway Company, and had offered the hospitality of his road whenever General Grant traveled over it; as in fact did most of the railroad companies in England. Consulate-General of the United States for great Britain and Ireland, London, Oct. 18th, 1877. E. C. Dear General,—I just returned this A. M. from Birmingham. The reception there was extremely flattering, and the speeches showed not only present warmth of sentiment for America but that it had been the same during t
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