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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gorges, Sir Ferdinando 1565-1647 (search)
Gorges, Sir Ferdinando 1565-1647 Colonial proprietor; born in Ashton Phillips, Somerset, England, about 1565; was associated with the courtiers of Queen Elizabeth; was engaged in the conspiracy of the Earl of Essex against the Queen's council (1600) ; and testified against him at his trial for treason (1601). Having served in the royal navy with distinction, he was appointed governor of Plymouth in 1604. A friend of Raleigh, he became imbued with that great man's desire to plant a colony in America, and when Captain Weymouth returned from the New England coast (1605), and brought captive natives with him, Gorges took three of them into his own home, from whom, after instructing them in the English language, he gained much information about their country. Gorges now became chiefly instrumental in forming the Plymouth Company (q. v.), to settle western Virginia, and from that time he was a very active member, defending its rights before Parliament, and stimulating by his own zeal
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Government, instrument of. (search)
; Great Grimsby, 1; Middlesex, 4; London, 6; Westminster, 2; Monmouthshire, 3; Norfolk, 10; Norwich, 2; Lynn-Regis, 2; Great Yarmouth, 2; Northamptonshire, 6; Peterborough, 1; Northampton, 1; Nottinghamshire, 4; Nottingham, 2; Northumberland, 3; Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1; Berwick, 1; Oxfordshire, 5; Oxford City, 1; Oxford University, 1; Woodstock, 1; Rutlandshire, 2; Shropshire, 4; Shrewsbury, 2; Bridgnorth, 1; Ludlow, 1; Staffordshire, 3; Lichfield, 1; Stafford, 1; Newcastle-under-Lyne, 1; Somersetshire, 11; Bristol, 2; Taunton, 2; Bath, 1; Wells, 1; Bridgewater, 1; Southamptonshire, 8; Winchester, 1; Southampton, 1; Portsmouth, 1; Isle of Wight, 2: Andover, 1; Suffolk, 10; Ipswich, 2; Bury St. Edmunds, 2; Dunwich, 1; Sudbury, 1; Surrey, 6; Southwark, 2; Guildford, 1; Reigate, 1; Sussex, 9; Chichester, 1; Lewes, 1; East Grinstead, 1; Arundel, 1; Rye, 1; Westmoreland, 2; Warwickshire, 4; Coventry, 2; Warwick, 1; Wiltshire, 10; New Sarum, 2; Marlborough, 1; Devizes, 1; Worcestershire, 5;
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Locke, John -1704 (search)
Locke, John -1704 Born in Wrington, Somersetshire, Aug. 29, 1632. His father was a parliamentary captain. He graduated at Oxford, was fond of philosophical studies, associated with men of wit, and chose the profession of a physician. His first public employment was as secretary in a diplomatic mission to the Court of Brandenburg in 1664. While pursuing philosophical studies in 1667, he became acquainted with Lord Ashley (afterwards Earl of Shaftesbury), and by his medical skill advised a surgical operation that saved his lordship's life. By him Locke was introduced to the most distinguished statesmen of the time. He superintended the education of Ashley's son, and assisted him in preparing a scheme of government for the Carolinas (see fundamental constitutions). When Ashley (then Earl of Shaftesbury) was accused of treason (1683), he fled to Holland, and Locke followed him. Locke had held various public offices, but now he remained quietly in Holland until after the revolu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Popham, George 1550-1607 (search)
Popham, George 1550-1607 Colonist; born in Somersetshire, England, about 1550; became a patentee of a grant in the present State of Maine; and sailed from Plymouth, England, May 31, 1607, with two ships and 100 men. Popham commanded one of the vessels and Raleigh Gilbert the other. The expedition was a failure. Popham died Feb. 5, 1608. His brother, Sir John, who was lord chief-justice of the king's bench, and an earnest promoter of settlements in America, was born in Somersetshire, England, about 1550; became a patentee of a grant in the present State of Maine; and sailed from Plymouth, England, May 31, 1607, with two ships and 100 men. Popham commanded one of the vessels and Raleigh Gilbert the other. The expedition was a failure. Popham died Feb. 5, 1608. His brother, Sir John, who was lord chief-justice of the king's bench, and an earnest promoter of settlements in America, was born in Somersetshire, England, in 1531; became chief-justice in 1592; and died in June, 1607.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Walker, Sir Hovenden 1660- (search)
Walker, Sir Hovenden 1660- Military officer; born in Somersetshire, England, about 1660; became a captain in the navy in 1692, and rear-admiral of the white in 1710. The next year he was knighted by Queen Anne. He made an attempt to capture Quebec in 1711, commanding the naval armament sent for that purpose (see Quebec). Returning to England, his ship, the Edgar, blew up at Spithead, when nearly all the crew perished. This accident and the disastrous expedition to Quebec drew upon him almost unqualified censure, and he was dismissed from the service. He afterwards settled upon a plantation in South Carolina; but returned to Great Britain, and died of a broken heart in Dublin, Ireland, in January, 1726.
on of Britain are occasionally disinterred in various parts of the country. The art of painting in enamel or with metalline colors, and fixing them by fire, was practiced by the Egyptians and Etruscans on pottery, and passed from them to the Greeks and Romans. Enameling was also practiced among the Chinese. Specimens of enameled work are yet extant of early British, Saxon, and Norman manufacture. An enameled jewel, made by order of Alfred the Great, A. D. 887, was discovered in Somersetshire, England, and is preserved at Oxford. An enameled gold cup was presented by King John to the corporation of Lynn, Norfolk, and is yet preserved. Luca della Robbia, born about 1410, applied tin enamel to pottery, and excelled in the art. Bernard Palissy, the Huguenot potter, born about 1500, devoted many years to the discovery and application of enamels of various colors to pottery. He was remarkably successful in true copies of natural objects. His method died with him. He died in 15
n his Opus Major, writes: This instrument, a plano-convex glass or large segment of a sphere, is useful to old men and to those who have weak eyes, for they may see the smallest letters sufficiently magnified. Bacon was born at Ilchester, in Somersetshire, in 1214, the year before the signing of Magna Charta; was educated at Oxford, then studied in Paris, where he took his degree, which was subsequently confirmed by the Oxford University; in 1240 he took the vows of a Franciscan at Oxford. HgressRoebling. Niagara (upper)NiagaraNiagara Falls1,2501869 CincinnatiOhioCincinnati1,057Roebling. WheelingOhioWheeling1,0101848Ellet. FribourgSarineFribourg870631834Chaley. NiagaraNiagaraNiagara River821.4751848Roebling. CliftonAvonSomersetshire, England7021864 Charing CrossThamesLondon, England676.5501845I. K. Brunel. DanubePesth666451850Clarke. La Roche BernardVilaineLa Roche Bernard, France650.4501846Leblanc. NashvilleCumberlandNashville, Tenn650Foster. MenaiMenai StraitsWales5704
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 10: death of Mrs. Garrison.—final visit to England.—1876, 1877. (search)
of all the labor and excitement, Mr. Garrison gained perceptibly in health during his stay in London. Besides the friends already named, he met many others with whom he enjoyed a renewal of intercourse—among them, Henry Vincent, Madame Emilie Ashurst Venturi, Mrs. Priscilla Bright McLaren, Mrs. Fawcett, Miss Helen Taylor, Thomas Hughes, Professor James Bryce, Justin McCarthy, and George J. Holyoake. But he was glad at last to leave the great metropolis for the rural quiet and beauty of Somersetshire, whither he now went to visit Mr. Bright's daughter, Mrs. Helen Bright Clark, and her husband. With them he spent a delightful Sunday in William S. Clark. their home at Street, near Glastonbury and its ruined July 1. Abbey. Thence he drove with them by way of Wells July 2. (whose cathedral, with its Bishop's Garden and ancient moat and wall, he greatly admired) and Cheddar to Sidcot, where he enjoyed the hospitality of Mrs. Margaret A. Tanner, a staunch supporter of Mrs. Butler, in
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
han, Lord Wharncliffe; and besides, from my friend Brown in Scotland, Mr. Marshall at the Lakes, Lord Morpeth in Ireland; and this moment, while I write, I have received a note from the greatest of wits, Sydney Smith, 1771-1845. He invited Sumner to dine March 6, 1839, at 33 Charles Street, Berkeley Square; and, after Sumner's return from the Continent, to breakfast at 56 Green Street. who says, If your rambles lead you to the West of England, come and see me at Combe Florey, Taunton, Somersetshire. Thus you see that there is ample store of means for passing an interesting two months, when you consider that I shall take the circuits, with all these. Mr. Justice Littledale Joseph Littledale, 1767-1842. He was appointed a judge of the King's Bench in 1824, and resigned in 1841. His distinction is confined to the law. Sumner dined with him in Dec., 1838. is a good old man, simple and kind, but without any particular sagacity. Patteson, who appears to stand next after Baron Par
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
corder of Bristol in 1846, and a Judge of the Common Pleas in 1854. Sumner dined with him in February, 1839, at his house, 11 Pall Mall East. one of the Queen's counsel,—through portions of Cornwall, and that most beautiful county, Devon, stopping at Plymouth; being received by the commander of the largest ship in port, a barge placed at my orders to visit any ship I wished, and an officer designated to show me over the dockyard. From Exeter I went up through the green fields of Devon and Somerset to the delicious parsonage of Sydney Smith, The following note is preserved:— Combe Florey, Taunton, Aug. 16, 1838. My dear Sir,—I have a great admiration of Americans, and have met a great number of agreeable, enlightened Americans. There is something in the honesty, simplicity and manliness of your countrymen which pleases me very much. We were very grateful to you for believing in us and coming to see us; and it will be pleasant to me to think that I am remembered and thought <
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