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Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 1 1 Browse Search
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the course of the year 1635 began the exodus from the Charles River to the Connecticut. In June, 1636, Mr. Hooker went with most of his congregation and founded Hartford, while the congregations of Dorchester and Watertown founded Windsor and Wethersfield. The exodus from the New Town was so great that of the families dwelling there in January, 1635, not more than eleven are known to have remained until the end of 1636. But the places of those who departed were filled without delay. In the of Vane, who had returned to England; for a moment he was inclined to follow in the footsteps of Hooker, whose daughter he had lately married, and lead his congregation to the beautiful hillside of Mattabeseck, on the Connecticut River below Wethersfield. But it was left for other settlers a few years later to occupy that spot and call it Middletown. Shepard remained in the New Town, and his presence there is believed to have shaped its destinies. For his vigilancy against heresies had been
y of the city; sources of supply, 113, 114; Stony Brook and its tributaries, 114; storage basins, 114; distributing reservoir at Payson Park, 114; objections to municipal control, 114; its financial standing, 115; a help to the poor, 115; street improvements by, 116, 117; surroundings of Fresh Pond, 117. Weights and Measures, Sealer of, 405. West Boston Bridge, 29, 495. West Cambridge, 9, 16. West Dock Canal, 30. West End, 3. Western Avenue Bridge, 29. West Field, 4. Wethersfield, Conn., founded, 6. Whalley, the regicide, 11. Wharton, Francis, 68. White, Daniel, Charity, 277, 320. Whitefield, George, preaches on the Common, 13, 48; a friend to the college, 236. Whitefield tree, 48. Willard, Emery, the village strong man, 40. William H. Smart Post 30, 288. Williams, Rev. Mr., 73. Willson, Forceythe, 68. Wilson, John, Sr., 334. Wilson, Rev. John, election speech of, 7, 48. Windmill Hill, 3. Windsor, Conn., founded, 6. Winlock,
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), Historic churches and homes of Cambridge. (search)
Church was beaten upon by the waves of a wild tide of patriotism. The rector was forced to fly and had but a troubled life of it thereafter. In the summer of 1774 the last regular services before the Revolution were held in the church. The only member left was Judge Lee, who was unmolested because his principles were mild. Now for a space the church ministered to the soldiers' bodily rather than to their spiritual needs. After Lexington, the company of Captain John Chester from Wethersfield, Conn., was quartered in the church. There is still a bullet mark in the porch as a reminder of this period. The sole member who took the colonial side, John Pidgeon, was appointed commissary-general to the forces. The rest, Tories, fled to General Gage in Boston. General Washington, a good churchman, though for reasons of expediency he often worshipped with his men at the Congregational meeting house (then under Dr. Appleton), when Mrs. Washington came, Dec. 31, 1775, had Christ Churc
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
ed for the College, north. Feb. 26, 1651-2. Ordered, That the Townsmen shall make sale of the land whereon the old meeting-house stood. The Reverend Jonathan Mitchell, described by Mather as the matchless Mitchell, was born at Halifax, in Yorkshire, England, about 1624, and was brought by his father to New England in 1635. Their first settlement, says Dr. Holmes, was at Concord, in Massachusetts; whence, a year after, they removed to Saybrook, in Connecticut; and, not long after, to Wethersfield. Their next removal was to Stamford, where Mr. Mitchell, the father, died in 1645, aetat. LV. The classical studies of his son Jonathan were suspended for several years after his arrival in America; but, on the earnest advice of some that had observed his great capacity, they were at length resumed in 1642. In 1645, at the age of twenty-one, he entered Harvard College. Here he became religiously impressed under Mr. Shepard's ministry, which he so highly estimated as afterward to obse
hysician in Brookfield, where he in. Sarah, dau. of Dr. Jabez Upham, 5 May 1768, and d. 15 Feb. 1814, a. 69; his w. Sarah d. at Claremont, N. II., April 1827. Their children were Sarah, m. Samuel Fiske, Esq., Claremont, N. H., son of Rev. Nathan Fiske, D. D., of Brookfield; Betsey, m. Thomas Haskins of Boston, and d. at Roxbury in 1849; Fanny, m.——Witherell of Brookfield; Mehetabel, m. Josiah Lyon, and d. at Woodstock, Vt., May 1850, a. 74; Francis Augustus, b. 4 Aug. 1782, a merchant at Wethersfield, Vt., 1804, and at Boston about 1810, d. at Newton 7 Ap. 1818; Martha Brandon, m. David H. Sumner of Hartland, Vt.; John, prob. grad. H. C. 1807, d. at Worcester Aug. 1824, a. 39; George, d. at Brookfield July 1803, a. 15. Francis, Richard, 4 July 1644, bought of Nathaniel Sparhawk a house and land at the N. E. corner of Holmes Place, being part of the estate recently owned by Mr. Royal Morse. By his w. Alice, he had Stephen, b. 7 Feb. 1644-5; Sarah, b. 4 Dec. 1646, m. John Squires,
hysician in Brookfield, where he in. Sarah, dau. of Dr. Jabez Upham, 5 May 1768, and d. 15 Feb. 1814, a. 69; his w. Sarah d. at Claremont, N. II., April 1827. Their children were Sarah, m. Samuel Fiske, Esq., Claremont, N. H., son of Rev. Nathan Fiske, D. D., of Brookfield; Betsey, m. Thomas Haskins of Boston, and d. at Roxbury in 1849; Fanny, m.——Witherell of Brookfield; Mehetabel, m. Josiah Lyon, and d. at Woodstock, Vt., May 1850, a. 74; Francis Augustus, b. 4 Aug. 1782, a merchant at Wethersfield, Vt., 1804, and at Boston about 1810, d. at Newton 7 Ap. 1818; Martha Brandon, m. David H. Sumner of Hartland, Vt.; John, prob. grad. H. C. 1807, d. at Worcester Aug. 1824, a. 39; George, d. at Brookfield July 1803, a. 15. Francis, Richard, 4 July 1644, bought of Nathaniel Sparhawk a house and land at the N. E. corner of Holmes Place, being part of the estate recently owned by Mr. Royal Morse. By his w. Alice, he had Stephen, b. 7 Feb. 1644-5; Sarah, b. 4 Dec. 1646, m. John Squires,
to themselves. The younger Winthrop, the future benefactor of Connecticut, one of those men in whom the elements of human excellence are mingled in the happiest union, returned from England July 7. with a commission from the proprietaries of that region, to erect a fort at the mouth of the stream—a Oct. 8. purpose which was accomplished. Yet, before his arrival in Massachusetts Bay, settlements had been commenced, by emigrants from the environs of Boston, at Hartford, and Windsor, and Wethersfield; and in the last days of the pleasantest of the autumnal months, a Oct. 15, O. S. company of sixty pilgrims, women and children being of the number, began their march to the west. Never before had the forests of America witnessed such a scene. But the journey was begun too late in the season: the winter was so unusually early and severe, Nov 15 that provisions could not arrive by way of the river; Trumbull's Connecticut, i. App. No. i imperfect shelter had been provided; cattle peri
aen Block, building a Chap. XV.} 1614. yacht of sixteen tons burden, which he named the Unrest, plied forth to explore the vicinity. First of European navigators he steered through Hell Gate, passed the archipelago near Norwalk, and discovered the river of Red Hills, which we call the Housatonic. From the bay of Newhaven he turned to the east, and ascended the beautiful river which he named the Freshwater, but which, to this hour, keeps its Indian name of Connecticut. Near the site of Wethersfield he came upon one Indian tribe; just above Hartford, upon another; and he heard tales of the Horicans, who dwelt in the west, and moved over lakes in bark canoes. The Pequods he found on the banks of their river. At Montauk Point, then occupied by a savage nation, he reached the ocean, proving the land east of the Sound to be an island. Thus far he was a discoverer. The island which bears his name, Verazzano, nearly a century before, had named Claudia. After exploring both channels of
ne; and Ingersoll sent word by them that he would meet the concourse at Hartford. On Thursday morning Ingersoll set forward alone. Two or three miles below Wethersfield, he met an advanced party of four or five; half a mile further, another of thirty; and soon the main body of about five hundred men, farmers and freeholders, aived Ingersoll, and then, to the sound of trumpets, rode forward through the alluvial farms that grace the banks of the lovely Connecticut, till they came into Wethersfield. There in the broad main street, twenty rods wide, in the midst of neat dwelling-houses, and of a people that owned the soil and themselves held the plough, iAfter dinner, a cavalcade, which by this time had increased to the number of near one thousand men, escorted him along the road, studded with farm houses, from Wethersfield into Hartford, and dismounted within twenty yards of the house where the Assembly was sitting. The main body, led by Durkee, The name is Durgie in my copy
he Oct. royal governors took the oath to carry the Stamp Act punctually into effect. In Connecticut, which, in chap. XIX.} 1765. Oct. its assembly, had already voted American taxation by a British parliament to be unprecedented and unconstitutional, Dyer, of the council, entreated Fitch not to take an oath which was contrary to that of the governor, to maintain the rights of the colony. But Fitch had urged the assembly to prosecute for riot the five hundred that coerced Ingersoll at Wethersfield; had talked of the public spirit in the language of an enemy; had said that the Act must go down; that forty regulars could guard the stamp papers; and that the American conduct would bring from home violent measures and the loss of charters; and he resolved to comply; E. Stiles' Diary. on which Pitkin, Trumbull, and Dyer, truly representing the sentiments of Connecticut, rose with indignation and left the room. The governor of Rhode Island stood alone in his patriotic refusal. But
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