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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, colony of (search)
, including the region of country between the Hudson and Delaware rivers; and in August the same year an English fleet appeared before New Amsterdam and demanded its surrender. Governor Stuyvesant resisted for a while, but was compelled to comply, and the whole territory claimed by the Dutch passed into the possession of the English on Sept. 8, 1664. At the treaty of peace between England and Holland, the Dutch were allowed to New York City Hall and docks in 1679. retain the colony of Surinam, in Guiana, England retaining New York. Edmund Andros was appointed governor, and a formal surrender of the province occurred in October. In 1683 Thomas Dongan became governor, and, under instructions from the Duke of York, he called an assembly of representatives chosen by the people, and a charter of liberties was given to the colonists. This was the foundation of representative government in New York; but the privileges promised were denied. When James was driven from the throne, and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
in to meet charges; reaches Cadiz......June 11, 1496 Patent from Henry VII. of England to John Cabot and his three sons......March 5. 1495-96 John Cabot discovers the North American continent......June 24, 1497 Columbus sails with six ships on his third voyage, May 30; discovers Trinidad, July 31; lands on terra firma without knowing it to be a new continent, naming it Isla Santa......Aug. 1, 1498 Discovers the mouth of the Orinoco......August, 1498 Alonso de Ojeda discovers Surinam, June; and the Gulf of Venezuela. Amerigo Vespucci accompanies him on this voyage......1499 Amerigo Vespucci's first voyage......1499 Vicente Yañez Pinzon discovers Brazil, Jan. 20, and the river Amazon......Jan. 26, 1500 Pedro Alvarez de Cabral, of Portugal, discovers Brazil, April 22, and takes possession of for the King of Portugal......May, 1500 Gasper Cortereal, in the service of Portugal, discovers Labrador......1500 Francisco de Bobadilla appointed governor of Hispani
a, that the enemy was in possession of the neutral territory. There was a Federal Consul resident in the place, who was the principal contractor, for supplying the French garrison with fresh beef! and there were three, or four Yankee schooners in the harbor, whose skippers had a monopoly of the trade in flour and notions. What could the Sumter effect against such odds? In the course of an hour after my boat returned, we were again under way, running down the coast, in the direction of Surinam, to see if the Dutchmen would prove more propitious, than the Frenchmen had done. About six P. M., we passed the Salut Islands, three in number, on the summit of one of which shone the white walls of a French military hospital, contrasting prettily with the deep-green foliage of the shadetrees around it. It was surrounded by low walls, on which were mounted some small guns en barbette. Hither are sent all the sick sailors, and soldiers from Cayenne. August 17th.—Morning clear, and beaut
itted by an edict of Solyman the Great. The Venetians brought it from the Levant in 1615, and in 1645 it was introduced into Marseilles. Coffee was introduced into England by Daniel Edwards, a Turkey merchant, in 1657. The first coffee-house in England was in St. Michael's Alley, Cornhill, London; opened by Pasqua, a Greek servant of Mr. Edwards. It was then sold at from four to five guineas a pound. Coffee-trees were imported from Mocha by the Dutch about 1700, and thence carried to Surinam. In 1714 a coffee-plant was presented by the magistrates of Amsterdam to Louis XIV., and placed in the grounds at Marly. The progeny of this plant were carried to Cayenne and Martinique. In two centuries its use spread all over the civilized world. The coffee-tree does not thrive where the temperature ever sinks below 55° F. It grows to the hight of 12 or 15 feet, has a leaf like the laurel, but not so thick. The blossoms are white, like the jessamine, and issue from the axillae of t
cient times. Tamarac (Am. larch).Larix americanaN and N. e. States. Teak (African)Oldfieldia africanaW. AfricaHard. Railway-carriages, shipbuilding, etc. Teak (Indian)Tectona grandisIndiaHard. Railway-carriages, shipbuilding. ThornCrataegus punctataEastern U. S.Hard, light-red. Turnery. Toon-woodCedrela toonaIndiaFurniture and cabinet-work. ToquaHimalayaDark-colored: takes fine polish. Tulip-woodHarpulia pendulaAustralia, etcHard. Veneers, cabinet-work, turnery, etc. Turtle-woodSurinamTurnery. Vegetable ivoryPhytelephas macrocarpaCentral America, etcA nut used in turnery. Walnut (black)Juglans nigraEastern U. S.Medium. dark Furniture, ornaments, gun-stocks. Walnut (English)Juglans regiaEurope, etcHard. Furniture, gun-stocks, etc. Walnut (French)Persia, Asia Minor, etcFrench is a misnomer. Called in England Circassian walnut. Walnut (white) (butternut)Juglans cinereaEastern U. S.Soft, pale brown. Furniture. White-woodPittosporum bicolor, etcN. S. Wales, etc.Hard
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, VII. Kansas and John Brown (search)
aribaldi; but he had studied guerrilla warfare for himself in books, as well as in Europe, and had for a preceptor Hugh Forbes, an Englishman who had been a Garibaldian soldier. Brown's plan was simply to penetrate Virginia with a few comrades, to keep utterly clear of all attempt to create slave insurrection, but to get together bands and families of fugitive slaves, and then be guided by events. If he could establish them permanently in those fastnesses, like the Maroons of Jamaica and Surinam, so much the better; if not, he would make a break from time to time, and take parties to Canada, by paths already familiar to him. All this he explained to me and others, plainly and calmly, and there was nothing in it that we considered either objectionable or impracticable; so that his friends in Boston Theodore Parker, Howe, Stearns, Sanborn, and myself — were ready to cooperate in his plan as thus limited. Of the wider organization and membership afterwards formed by him in Canada we
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, Bibliography (search)
o a Dyspeptic. (In Atlantic Monthly, April.) Same. (In his Outdoor Papers. 1863.) A Charge with Prince Rupert. (In Atlantic Monthly, June.) Def. VII. Murder of the Innocents. (In Atlantic Monthly, Sept.) Same. (In his Outdoor Papers. 1863.) 1860 (Worcester) A Visit to John Brown's Household in 1859. (In Redpath. Public Life of Captain John Brown.) Def. II. Maroons of Jamaica. (In Atlantic Monthly, Feb.) Same. (In his Travellers and Outlaws. 1889.) Maroons of Surinam. (In Atlantic Monthly, May.) Same. (In his Travellers and Outlaws. 1889.) Theodore Parker. (In Atlantic Monthly, Oct.) Def. II. Fayal and the Portuguese. (In Atlantic Monthly, Nov.) Def. VI. 1861 (Worcester) Barbarism and Civilization. (In Atlantic Monthly, Jan.) Same. (In his Outdoor Papers, 1863.) Gymnastics. (In Atlantic Monthly, March.) Same. (In his Outdoor Papers, 1863.) April days. (In Atlantic Monthly, April.) Def. VI. Denmark Vesey. (In Atlant
d a very numerous posterity. Jonathan the f. d. 7 Sept. 1712, a. 84, being the last survivor and the longest liver of his father's children. His w. Esther d. 5 Ap. 1713, a. 80. 5. John, s. of Rev. Samuel (3), grad. H. C. 1677, at the age of seventeen, and was ordained at Dorchester 28 June 1682, where he d. 26 May 1730. His children, by his w. Elizabeth, were Elijah, bap. 2 Dec. 1683, grad. H. C. 1703, a physician and Justice of the Peace, d. 8 Oct. 1736; Thomas, b. 1685, settled at Surinam, where he d. 18 Oct. 1714; Israel Stoughton, b. 14 Oct. 1687, d. 22 Mar. 1688; John, b. 16 Jan. 1688-9, d. 3 Mar. 1728; Ann, b. prob. 1691, d. young; Elizabeth, b. 12 Nov. 1693, m. Capt. John Lowder, Boston; Samuel, b. 12 Nov. 1696; Hannah, b. 3 Nov. 1698, m. Rev. Samuel Dunbar of Stoughton; Mary and Mehetabel, twins, b. 4 June 1701, of whom the latter d. 1 May 1727; Stoughton, b. 24 July 1702, buried 26 Nov. 1735; George, b. 11 Nov. 1704. Soon after Mr. Danforth's death, an obituary appe
d a very numerous posterity. Jonathan the f. d. 7 Sept. 1712, a. 84, being the last survivor and the longest liver of his father's children. His w. Esther d. 5 Ap. 1713, a. 80. 5. John, s. of Rev. Samuel (3), grad. H. C. 1677, at the age of seventeen, and was ordained at Dorchester 28 June 1682, where he d. 26 May 1730. His children, by his w. Elizabeth, were Elijah, bap. 2 Dec. 1683, grad. H. C. 1703, a physician and Justice of the Peace, d. 8 Oct. 1736; Thomas, b. 1685, settled at Surinam, where he d. 18 Oct. 1714; Israel Stoughton, b. 14 Oct. 1687, d. 22 Mar. 1688; John, b. 16 Jan. 1688-9, d. 3 Mar. 1728; Ann, b. prob. 1691, d. young; Elizabeth, b. 12 Nov. 1693, m. Capt. John Lowder, Boston; Samuel, b. 12 Nov. 1696; Hannah, b. 3 Nov. 1698, m. Rev. Samuel Dunbar of Stoughton; Mary and Mehetabel, twins, b. 4 June 1701, of whom the latter d. 1 May 1727; Stoughton, b. 24 July 1702, buried 26 Nov. 1735; George, b. 11 Nov. 1704. Soon after Mr. Danforth's death, an obituary appe
from Main to Back (now Warren) street. Captain Eben Breed was a retired master mariner, who gave his name to the elevation on which the battle of Bunker Hill was fought. He was a son of John Breed, who had been a soldier in King Philip's war, and was father to John Breed, the distiller. Breed's Island, northeast of East Boston, takes its name from this family. Captain Breed died in 1754, leaving a large estate, appraised at £ 5,647 16s 1d. His will speaks of his son John, resident at Surinam, S. A., and that one's son Ebenezer. William Hoppin was a rigger, who died a very old man in 1773. The late Rev. Dr. Hoppin, of Christ church, Cambridge, was a great-grandson. Samuel Hutchinson, the shoemaker, lived on the road to Winter Hill. Miriam Fosket, born in 1665, Miriam Cleveland, was widow of Thomas Fosket, a brother of Jonathan, who once owned the windmill, which he sold to John Mallet, on the southeast of the range called Captain Carter's draught. Miriam was widowed i
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