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Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 3 3 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 2 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First cavalry. (search)
k at Savage's Station; and, after hard service in the battle of White Oak Swamp, it covered the retreat, at midnight, to the James river. It rendered good service at Malvern Hill, and cleared the road of teams on the following day, so that the artillery and ambulances could pass. A company of Rush's Lancers took its place at General Franklin's headquarters, at Harrison's Landing, when ordered to proceed with the regiment to join Burnside at Fredericksburg. It marched with that officer to Antietam, and won laurels at Hyattstown, Maryland, just before that battle, and at Williamsport, at its close, where several of its members were wounded by grapeshot while charging upon a battery. In Western Virginia, it made its mark among Imboden's men, helping to capture the camp of that bold partisan on two different occasions. In the Shenandoah Valley, under Milroy, it performed many bold deeds, in company with the regiment, while fighting against Mosby, Gilmore, and Imboden. Here Captain Bo
September 19. General McClellan, from his headquarters near Antietam, Md., sent the following despatches to the War Department at Washington: 8.30 A. M.--But little occurred yesterday except skirmishing. Last night the enemy abandoned his position, leaving his dead and wounded on the field. We are again in pursuit. I do not know whether he is falling back to an interior position or crossing the river. We may safely claim a victory. 10.80 A. M.--General Pleasanton is driving the enemy across the river. Our victory is complete. The enemy is driven back into Virginia. Maryland and Virginia are now safe. In the rebel House of Representatives in session at Richmond, Va., Mr. Foote offered the following resolution: Resolved, by the Congress of the confederate States of America, That the signal success with which Divine Providence has so continuously blessed our arms for several months past, would fully justify the confederate Government in despatching a commissio
extract from his report, on McClellan's delay at Yorktown, 122; on McClellan's failure to improve the opportunity at Fair Oaks, 147. Barnes, Col., 12th S. C.. killed at Antietam, 210. Barrett, Col., attacked by Gen. Slaughter, at Brazos, 757. Bartlett, Gen., at Gaines's Mill, 436. Barton, Col., 3d N. H., at Fort Wagner, 477. Batesville, Ark., Marmaduke defeated at, 447. Baton Rouge, La., occupied by Admiral Farragut, 101; Breckinridge defeated at, 102. battles-- Antietam, Md., 205. Arkansas Post, 292. Atlanta, Ga., 637. Averysboroa, N. C., 706. Baton Rouge, La., 103. Bentonville, N. C., 707. Bristow Station, Va., 181. Bull Run (2d), Va., 183-7. Cedar Creek, Va., 612. Cedar Mountain, Va., 177. Champion Hills, Miss., 307. Chantilly, Va.. 188. Chancellorsville, Va., 356. Chickamauga, Tenn.. 415. Cold Harbor, Va., 579. Corinth, Miss., 225. Crampton's Gap, Md., 199. Cross-Keys, Va., 138. Dallas, Ga., 298. Fair Oaks (or Seven Pines), Va. 141.
outh Mountain, Md. 1 Petersburg, Va. 20 Antietam, Md. 7 Mine Explosion, Va. 20 Fredericksburg, Va. 1 Weldon Railroad, Va., June 22 1 Antietam, Md. 25 Petersburg, Va. 2 Fredericksburg, VaMalvern Hill, Va. 1 Cold Harbor, Va. 12 Antietam, Md. 20 Siege of Petersburg, Va. 12 Frederic Mountain, Md. 5 Bethesda Church, Va. 2 Antietam, Md. 73 Petersburg Mine, Va. 13 Fredericksbu Oak Swamp, Va. 1 Fort Stevens, D. C. 7 Antietam, Md. 7 Charlestown, W. Va. 1 Fredericksburg,73 Seven Days Battle, Va. 2 11 25 38 Antietam, Md. 8 42   50 Fredericksburg, Va. 4 68   72 10 7 19 Malvern Hill, Va. 5 28   33 Antietam, Md. 27 75   102 Fredericksburg, Va. 17 97 1lvern Hill, Va. 4 Charlestown, W. Va. 8 Antietam, Md. 1 Opequon, Va. 3 Williamsport, Md. 2 Fiker's Gap, Va. 1 New Hope Church, Ga. 6 Antietam, Md. 8     Present, also, at Lookout Mounouth Mountain, Md. 43 Wilderness, Va. 9 Antietam, Md. 26 Spotsylvania, Va. 30 Jackson, Miss. [70 more...
61 South Mountain, Md. The Pennsylvania Reserves sustained a severe percentage of loss in this action, but their regiments being small their casualties do not appear in this list.             Sept. 14, 1862.             23d Ohio Cox's Ninth 32 95 3 130 45th Pennsylvania Willcox's Ninth 27 107 --- 134 17th Michigan Willcox's Ninth 26 106 --- 132 7th Wisconsin Hatch's First 11 116 20 147 6th Wisconsin Hatch's First 11 79 2 92 30th Ohio Cox's Ninth 17 53 -- 70 Antietam, Md.             Sept. 17, 1862.             15th Massachusetts Includes a company of sharpshooters, which were attached to this regiment. Sedgwick's Second 65 255 24 344 28th Pennsylvania Greene's Twelfth 44 217 5 266 9th New York Hawkins's Zouaves. Rodman's Ninth 45 174 14 233 12th Massachusetts Ricketts's First 49 165 10 224 1st Delaware French's Second 31 182 17 230 7th Michigan Sedgwick's Second 39 178 4 221 35th Massachusetts Sturgis's Nint
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
my retains possession of the battle field and buries its enemy's dead, it certainly cannot be considered as a defeated army; and that when an army abandons the field, either slowly or in rout, and leaves its dead and wounded in the hands of the enemy, it certainly should not claim a victory. In the following named battles the Union armies remained in undisturbed possession of the field, the enemy leaving many of their wounded, and most of their dead unburied: Rich Mountain, W. Va. Antietam, Md. Gettysburg, Pa. Williamsburg, Va. South Mountain, Md. Magnolia Hills, Miss. Crampton's Gap, Md. Kernstown, Va. Raymond, Miss. Mill Springs, Ky. Baton Rouge, La. Champion's Hill, Miss. Fort Donelson, Tenn. Iuka, Miss. Stone's River, Tenn. Shiloh, Tenn. Corinth, Miss. Missionary Ridge, Tenn. Pea Ridge, Ark. Chaplin Hills, Ky. Fort Stevens, D. C. Roanoke Island, N. C. Resaca, Ga. Opequon, Va. New Berne, N. C. Atlanta, Ga., July 21-22. Cedar Creek, Va. Carter's Far
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
Ky.             August 30, 1862.             2d Tennessee B. J. Hill's Cleburne's 17 95 -- 112 13th Tennessee Preston Smith's Cleburne's 12 35 1 48 Maryland Heights, Md.             Sept. 13, 1862.             7th South Carolina Kershaw's McLaws's 13 100 -- 113 Crampton's Gap, Md.             Sept. 14, 1862.             16th Georgia Cobb's McLaws's 24 56 107 187 24th Georgia Cobb's McLaws's 12 59 55 126 15th North Carolina Cobb's McLaws's 11 48 124 183 Antietam, Md.             Sept. 17, 1862.             3d North Carolina Garland's D. H. Hill's 46 207 -- Includes loss at South Mountain on the 14th.253 13th Georgia Lawton's Ewell's 48 169 2 219 48th North Carolina Walker's Walker's 31 186 -- 217 27th North Carolina Walker's Walker's 31 168 -- 199 13th North Carolina G. B. Anderson's D. H. Hill's 41 149 -- Includes loss at South Mountain on the 14th.190 1st Texas Wofford's Hood's 4
, is the hope of the Colonel commanding the brigade. A. T. A. Torbert, Colonel First New-Jersey Volunteers, Commanding First Brigade. General Burnside's order on the death of General Reno. headquarters of Ninth army corps, Mouth of Antietam, Md., September 20. General order no. 17. The Commanding General announces to the corps the loss of their late leader, Major-General Jesse L. Reno. By the death of this distinguished officer the country loses one of its most devoted patriots, and Sharpsburgh will be inscribed on the respective regimental colors. By order of Brigadier-General Wilcox. Robert A. Hutchings, Capt. and Ass't Adj't-Gen. Honorable mention of troops. headquarters Ninth army corps, mouth of Antietam (Reek, Md., September 28, 1862. special order no. 8. The following officers and enlisted men of this command have been honorably mentioned in the official reports of the engagements of the seventeenth instant, and their names are hereby publish
redit to your officers and yourselves. While we lament the death of our brave comrades, who have fallen so gloriously, we can only commend their souls to God, and their sorrowing friends to his sure protection. May you go on from victory to victory, is the hope of the Colonel commanding the brigade. A. T. A. Torbert, Colonel First New-Jersey Volunteers, Commanding First Brigade. General Burnside's order on the death of General Reno. headquarters of Ninth army corps, Mouth of Antietam, Md., September 20. General order no. 17. The Commanding General announces to the corps the loss of their late leader, Major-General Jesse L. Reno. By the death of this distinguished officer the country loses one of its most devoted patriots, the army one of its most thorough soldiers. In the long list of battles in which Gen. Reno has fought in his country's service his name always appears with the brightest lustre, and he has now bravely met a soldier's death while gallantly leading h
of which we are still ready to die. Soldiers! In our rejoicings let us drop a manly tear for those who have fallen by our sides, and for the brave men of our division, whose spirits have fled to new scenes of glory. The names of South-Mountain and Sharpsburgh will be inscribed on the respective regimental colors. By order of Brigadier-General Wilcox. Robert A. Hutchings, Capt. and Ass't Adj't-Gen. Honorable mention of troops. headquarters Ninth army corps, mouth of Antietam (Reek, Md., September 28, 1862. special order no. 8. The following officers and enlisted men of this command have been honorably mentioned in the official reports of the engagements of the seventeenth instant, and their names are hereby published, as a testimony to their gallant and meritorious conduct in the field, and for efficiency in their departments. First division. Captain Robt. H. Hutchins, A. A.G.; Lieuts. Brackett, James W. Romeyn, and Dearborne, aids-de-camp on General Wil
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