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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts, (search)
o 1692 Massachusetts Bay colony. Name.Term. John Endicott (acting)1629 to 1630 Matthew Cradock (did not serve) John Winthrop1630 to 1634 Thomas Dudley1634 to 1635 John Haynes1635 to 1636 Henry Vane1636 to 1637 John Winthrop1637 to 1640 TJohn Winthrop1637 to 1640 Thomas Dudley1640 to 1641 Richard Bellingham1641 to 1642 John Winthrop1642 to 1644 governors of the Massachusetts colonies— Continued. Massachusetts Bay colony. Name.Term. John Endicott1644 to 1645 Thomas Dudley1645 to 1646 John WinthropJohn Winthrop1642 to 1644 governors of the Massachusetts colonies— Continued. Massachusetts Bay colony. Name.Term. John Endicott1644 to 1645 Thomas Dudley1645 to 1646 John Winthrop1646 to 1649 John Endicott1649 to 1650 Thomas Dudley1650 to 1651 John Endicott1651 to 1654 Richard Bellingham1654 to 1655 John Endicott1655 to 1665 Richard Belling1665 to 1673 John Leverett1673 to 1679 Simon Bradstreet1679 to 1684 Joseph DuJohn Winthrop1646 to 1649 John Endicott1649 to 1650 Thomas Dudley1650 to 1651 John Endicott1651 to 1654 Richard Bellingham1654 to 1655 John Endicott1655 to 1665 Richard Belling1665 to 1673 John Leverett1673 to 1679 Simon Bradstreet1679 to 1684 Joseph Dudley, president1684 to 1686 Sir Edmund Andros, governor-general1686 to 1689 Thomas Danforth (acting)1689 to 1692 governors of Massachusetts appointed by the King under the second charter. Name.Term. Sir William Phipps1692 to 1694 William S
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nowell, increase 1590-1655 (search)
Nowell, increase 1590-1655 Colonist; born in England in 1590; sailed for Massachusetts with John Winthrop in 1630; was commissioner of military affairs in 1632; and secretary of Massachusetts in 1644-49. He died in Boston, Mass., Nov. 1, 1655.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Phillips, Wendell 1811-1884 (search)
e third is, a compromise. Now, if the North conquers, or there be a compromise, one or the other of two things must come—either the old Constitution or a new one. I believe that, so far as the slavery clauses of the Constitution of ‘89 are concerned, it is dead. It seems to me impossible that the thrifty and painstaking North, after keeping 600,000 men idle for two or three years, at a cost of $2,000,000 a day; after that flag lowered at Sumter; after Baker, and Lyon, and Ellsworth, and Winthrop, and Putnam, and Wesselhoeft have given their lives to quell the rebellion; after our Massachusetts boys, hurrying through ploughed fields and workshops to save the capital, have been foully murdered on the pavements of Baltimore—I cannot believe in a North so lost, so craven as to put back slavery where it stood on March 4 last. But if there be reconstruction without those slave clauses, then in a little while, longer or shorter, slavery dies—indeed, on other basis but the basis of ‘
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Savage, James 1784-1873 (search)
Savage, James 1784-1873 Historian; born in Boston, Mass., July 13, 1784; graduated at Harvard College in 1803; admitted to the bar in 1807; served in the Massachusetts legislature. His publications include John Winthrop's history of New England from 1630 to 1646, with notes to illustrate the Civil and ecclesiastical concerns, the geography, settlement, and institutions of the country, and the lives and manners of the ancient planters; and Genealogical dictionary of the first settlers of New England, showing three generations of those who came before May, 1692. He died in Boston, Mass., March 8, 1873.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Say-Brook, Fort. (search)
Say-Brook, Fort. On his arrival at Boston in 1635, John Winthrop, son of the Governor of Massachusetts, bearing a commission from Lord Say and Seal and Lord Brook to begin a settlement on the Connecticut River and to be governor there, sent a bark of 30 tons, with twenty men, to take possession of the mouth of the river and begin a fortification there. He brought with him from England men, ordnance, ammunition, and $10,000 for the purpose. A few days after the arrival of the English at the mouth of the river, a Dutch vessel sent from Manhattan appeared, with the design of taking possession of the same spot. The English, having two pieces of cannon already mounted, would not allow the Dutch to land. The fort erected by the English was called Say-Brook, in honor of the proprietors of the land.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sedgwick, Robert 1590-1656 (search)
Sedgwick, Robert 1590-1656 Military officer; born in England in 1590; was one of the first settlers of Charlestown, Mass. (1635); an enterprising merchant, and for many years a deputy in the General Assembly. Having been a member of an artillery company in London, he was one of the founders of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery of Boston, in 1638, and was its captain in 1640: In 1652 he was promoted to the highest military rank in the colony. In 1643 he was associated with John Winthrop, Jr., in the establishment of the first furnace and iron-works in America. In 1654, being in England, he was employed by Cromwell to expel the French from the Penobscot; and was engaged in the expedition of the English which took Jamaica from the Spaniards. He was soon afterwards promoted to major-general. He died in Jamaica, May 24, 1656.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Twichell, Joseph Hopkins 1859- (search)
Twichell, Joseph Hopkins 1859- Clergyman; born in Southington, Conn.; graduated at Yale in 1859; and later studied at the Union Theological and Andover Theological seminaries; served through the Civil War as chaplain; has been pastor of the Asylum Hill Congregational William Marcy Tweed. Church at Hartford, Conn., since 1865. He wrote Life of John Winthrop; Some Puritan love-letters, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Underhill, John 1630-1672 (search)
Underhill, John 1630-1672 Colonist; born in Warwickshire, England; was a soldier on the Continent; came to New England with Winthrop in 1630; represented Boston in the General Court; favored Mrs. Hutchinson (see Hutchinsonian controversy), and was associated with Captain Mason, in command of forces in the Pequot War, in 1637. Banished from Boston as a heretic, he went to England, and there published a history of the Pequot War, entitled News from America. Dover, N. H., regarded as a place of refuge for the persecuted, received Underhill, and he was chosen governor. It was discovered that it lay within the chartered limits of Massachusetts, and the latter claimed political jurisdiction over it. Underhill treated the claim with contempt at first, but, being accused of gross immorality, he became alarmed, and not only yielded his power, but urged the people to submit to Massachusetts. He went before the General Court and made the most abject confession of the truth of the charges.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut, (search)
ch the river about the middle of......November, 1635 Colonists from Massachusetts, led by John Winthrop, son of Governor Winthrop, fortify the mouth of the Connecticut, and call the fort Say-BrookGovernor Winthrop, fortify the mouth of the Connecticut, and call the fort Say-Brook, in honor of Lords Say and Brook......Nov. 9, 1635 A Dutch vessel appears off the mouth, but is not suffered to land......November, 1635 Great suffering at Windsor, on the Connecticut, during 654 Law against Quakers: to be fined and sent out of jurisdiction......October, 1656 Gov. John Winthrop obtains for Connecticut a charter, with ample privileges, from Charles II......April 20, 1Connecticut losing her possessions on Long Island......Nov. 30, 1664 United colony elects John Winthrop governor......1665 Lyme made a town......May, 1667 Haddam made a town......October, 16necticut furnishes 315 men in the fight at Narraganset fort......Dec. 19, 1675 Death of Gov. John Winthrop......April 5, 1676 Boundary between Connecticut and New York of 1664 superseded by that
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
n: For, 10,421; against, 5,530......Oct. 4, 1859 Abraham Lincoln speaks at Elwood......Dec. 1, 1859 Abraham Lincoln speaks in the Methodist Episcopal Church at Atchison on the same day that John Brown is hanged in Virginia......Dec. 2, 1859 At election under Wyandotte constitution, Charles Robinson, Republican, is chosen governor......Dec. 6, 1859 Legislature adjourns from Lecompton to Lawrence......Jan. 21, 1860 Atchison and St. Joseph Railroad completed and cars running to Winthrop, opposite Atchison......Feb. 22, 1860 Track-laying of first railroad in Kansas begun on the Elwood and Marysville Railroad......March 20, 1860 House of Representatives votes to admit Kansas under the Wyandotte constitution......April 11, 1860 First pony express arrives at St. Joseph, Mo., 11 days and 12 hours from Sacramento......April, 1860 Breaking ground for the Santa Fe Railroad at Atchison occurred......June 13, 1860 George M. Beebe, secretary, becomes acting governor on
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