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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 14 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.) 14 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 12 0 Browse Search
Hesiod, Shield of Heracles 10 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 10 0 Browse Search
Hesiod, Works and Days 10 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 8 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Bacchae (ed. T. A. Buckley) 8 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 8 0 Browse Search
Plato, Laws 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Hesiod, Theogony. You can also browse the collection for Olympus (Greece) or search for Olympus (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 15 document sections:

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Hesiod, Theogony, line 853 (search)
So when Zeus had raised up his might and seized his arms, thunder and lightning and lurid thunderbolt,he leaped from Olympus and struck him, and burned all the marvellous heads of the monster about him. But when Zeus had conquered him and lashed him with strokes, Typhoeus was hurled down, a maimed wreck, so that the huge earth groaned. And flame shot forth from the thunderstricken lordin the dim rugged glens of the mount,According to Homer Typhoeus was overwhelmed by Zeus amongst the Arimi in Cilicia. Pindar represents him as buried under Aetna, and Tzetzes read Aetna in this passage.when he was smitten. A great part of huge earth was scorched by the terrible vapor and melted as tin melts when heated by men's art in channelledThe epithet (which means literallywell-bored) seems to refer to the spout of the crucible.crucibles; or as iron, which is hardest of all things, is shortenedby glowing fire in mountain glens and melts in the divine earth through the strength of Hephaestus.The fir
Hesiod, Theogony, line 901 (search)
as Athena: and the father of men and gods gave her birth by way of his head on the banks of the river Trito. And she remained hidden beneath the inward parts of Zeus, even Metis, Athena's mother, worker of righteousness, who was wiser than gods and mortal men. There the goddess (Athena) received thatSc.the aegis. Line 929s is probably spurious, since it disagrees with 929q and contains a suspicious reference to Athens.whereby she excelled in strength all the deathless less ones who dwell in Olympus, she who made the host-scaring weapon of Athena.And with it (Zeus) gave her birth, arrayed in arms of war. And of Amphitrite and the loud-roaring Earth-Shaker was born great, wide-ruling Triton, and he owns the depths of the sea, living with his dear mother and the lord his father in their golden house, an awful god. Also Cytherea bore to Ares the shield-piercer Panic and Fear,terrible gods who drive in disorder the close ranks of men in numbing war, with the help of Ares, sacker of towns;
Hesiod, Theogony, line 938 (search)
son. And now they both are gods. And Alcmena was joined in love with Zeus who drives the clouds and bore mighty Heracles. And Hephaestus, the famous Lame One, made Aglaea, youngest of the Graces, his buxom wife. And golden-haired Dionysus made brown-haired Ariadne, the daughter of Minos, his buxom wife: and the son of Cronos made her deathless and unageing for him. And mighty Heracles, the valiant son of neat-ankled Alcmena, when he had finished his grievous toils, made Hebe the child of great Zeus and goldshod Hera his shy wife in snowy Olympus. Happy he! For he has finished his great workand lives amongst the undying gods, untroubled and unaging all his days. And Perseis, the daughter of Ocean, bore to unwearying Helios Circe and Aeetes the king. And Aeetes, the son of Helios who shows light to men,took to wife fair-cheeked Idyia, daughter of Ocean the perfect stream, by the will of the gods: and she was subject to him in love through golden Aphrodite and bore him neat-ankled Medea.
Hesiod, Theogony, line 963 (search)
And now farewell, you dwellers on Olympus, and you islands and continents, and you briny sea within.Now sing the company of goddesses, sweet-voiced Muses of Olympus, daughter of Zeus who holds the aegis,—even those deathless ones who lay with mortal men and bore children like gods. Demeter, bright goddess, was joined in sweet lovewith the hero Iasion in a thrice-ploughed fallow in the rich land of Crete, and bore Plutus, a kindly god who goes everywhere over land and the sea's wide back, and hOlympus, daughter of Zeus who holds the aegis,—even those deathless ones who lay with mortal men and bore children like gods. Demeter, bright goddess, was joined in sweet lovewith the hero Iasion in a thrice-ploughed fallow in the rich land of Crete, and bore Plutus, a kindly god who goes everywhere over land and the sea's wide back, and he makes rich the man who finds him and into whose hands he comes, bestowing great wealth upon him. And Harmonia, the daughter of golden Aphrodite, bore to Cadmus Ino and Semele and fair-cheeked Agave and Autonoe whom long haired Aristaeus wedded, and Polydorus also in rich-crowned Thebes. And the daughter of Ocean, Callirrhoewas joined in the love of rich Aphrodite with stout-hearted Chrysaor and bore a son who was the strongest of all men, Geryones, whom mighty Heracles killed in sea-girt Eryt
Hesiod, Theogony, line 1003 (search)
he daughters of Nereus, the Old man of the Sea, Psamathe the fair goddess,was loved by Aeacus through golden Aphrodite and bore Phocus. And the silver-shod goddess Thetis was subject to Peleus and brought forth lion-hearted Achilles, the destroyer of men. And Cytherea with the beautiful crown was joined in sweet love with the hero Anchises and bore Aeneason the peaks of Ida with its many wooded glens. And Circe the daughter of Helius, Hyperion's son, loved steadfast Odysseus and bore Agrius and Latinus who was faultless and strong: also she brought forth Telegonus by the will of golden Aphrodite.And they ruled over the famous Tyrsenians, very far off in a recess of the holy islands. And the bright goddess Calypso was joined to Odysseus in sweet love, and bore him Nausithous and Nausinous. These are the immortal goddesses who lay with mortal men and bore them children like gods. But now, sweet-voiced Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus who holds the aegis, sing of the company of women.
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