Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for May 18th or search for May 18th in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 24 document sections:

1 2 3
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
ho were in the front line. On the 16th day of May the brigade marched through Resaca, crossed the river, and bivouacked near the railroad. On the 17th day of May marched through the town of Calhoun and became engaged with the enemy toward evening; had a skirmish, drove the enemy's artillery from its position, and established a strong line, which was ordered to be fortified. During the night the enemy withdrew from the front. Several men were killed and wounded at this point. On the 18th day of May the brigade marched through Adairsville, reached Kingston on the 19th, marched several miles beyond the town and were ordered to bivouac. At 4 p. m. an order was received to move forward immediately, it being ascertained that the enemy was in force near Cassville. The advance was made rapidly, severe skirmishing ensued, and the enemy driven from his advanced position before night. In this affair Captai-n Lendrum, of the Seventeenth Kentucky Volunteers, a gallant officer, was killed.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 94 (search)
Sharp skirmishing was kept up all day on my line, from which both my own troops and the enemy's suffered slightly. My artillery (twelve pieces) played all day with precision and, I have good reason to think, effect. Monday, May 16, I marched to Resaca and bivouacked in rear of the village. May 17, crossed the Oostenaula and marched by Damascus Church through Calhoun toward Adairsville; bivouacked at 11.30 p. m. about seven miles south of Calhoun, on the left of General Baird's division. May 18, marched through Adairsville, following, as on the day previous, Baird's division; bivouacked for the night at 12 midnight on the railroad within three miles of Kingston. May 19, marched in the rear of Baird into Kingston. Here, at 2.30, I was ordered by Major-General Palmer to move as rapidly as possible to seize a bridge (Gillem's) over the Etowah, south of Kingston, toward which a force of the enemy was supposed to be making, either to secure their retreat or to destroy it. Reaching the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
of the brigade. This ridge afforded a full view and was in good rifle range of the enemy's works. These regiments kept up a constant fire until night-fall, suffering some loss, and prevented the rebels from using a number of pieces of artillery which were in position behind the works. The brigade remained here during the night. May 16.-The brigade moved to Resaca and encamped for the night. May 17.-The brigade marched to a point about six miles south of Calhoun and encamped. May 18.-The brigade marched through Adairsville and encamped near the Western and Atlantic Railroad, four and a half miles from Kingston. May 19.-The command marched through Kingston to a bridge on the Etowah River, four miles southwest of the town. May 20.-The brigade moved at 8 a. m. to a point on the Western and Atlantic Railroad near Cassville, where it went into camp about noon. At this place the command stopped three days for the purpose of drawing shoes and clothing. May 23.-The
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 99 (search)
bel fort. My orders were to keep the fort silent. While relieving they opened on us with shell, but were immediately silenced by our rifles, and did not again use them against us. I lost to-day 1 lieutenant and I man killed, 1 lieutenant and 1 man wounded. May 16, the enemy having evacuated in the night, we started in pursuit, marching to the right to the military road through Resaca. May 17, 8.30 a. m., crossed the Oostenaula River, passed Calhoun, camping at midnight six miles beyond. May 18, moved forward slowly; toward evening passed Adairsville; halted for the night some three miles from Kingston. May 19, about noon, we passed Kingston; we filed right and halted within half a mile of the Etowah Valley road, cavalry being reported near. Our division was massed with First Brigade in reserve. May 20, moved forward about three miles and threw up earth-works one mile from Cassville, but did not meet with any contending force. The country through which our route lay was very br
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 101 (search)
of the charge, but did not quit the field. The conduct of the men and officers was all their commander could have asked, and I have frequently heard him express himself in terms of the highest admiration of their conduct on that day. On 15th May nothing of importance occurred with the regiment; were in rear line of works. May 16, marched to Resaca and camped. May 17, crossed Oostenaula, passed through Calhoun, and camped late at night near hospital Second Division, Fourth Army Corps. May 18, marched to within five miles of Kingston. May 19, moved early in the morning, passed through Kingston, and camped three miles beyond. May 20, marched in the direction of Cassville and camped on the railroad near a saw-mill. On the 21st and 22d nothing of importance occurred. At this point orders were received to dispose of all baggage but that which could be carried upon the person and to go stripped for battle. In accordance withthis order the baggage that could not be carried was sen
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 129 (search)
the enemy to their main lines. Darkness prevented any farther advance. The Sixtieth Illinois and Tenth Michigan Infantry were moved to the right during the night, Tenth Illinois guarding train, and arrangements made for assaulting the works early in the morning. During the night Capt. T. Wiseman, assistant adjutantgeneral of my staff, volunteered, with a company of the Sixteenth Illinois Infantry, to try and get possession of the bridge across the Oostenaula; darkness prevented success. May 18, a dense fog prevented an early advance; about 8 a. m. Tenth Michigan Infantry, deployed as skirmishers, drove the enemy's pickets across the Alabama road, and the rebel works were soon occupied by my command, the enemy having crossed the river, destroying the bridge. A battery of the enemy's, stationed on the opposite side of the Coosa River, having opened fire on my line, Captain Barnett's battery reported to me and was soon in a good position, and in a short time silenced that of the ene
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 132 (search)
ent proceeded back to where the knapsacks had been left, and at 8 a. m. was moving in the direction of Rome, Ga.; bivouacked for the night at 9 p. m., having marched about twenty miles. May 17, moved forward at daylight, marching rapidly; our advance encountered the enemy one mile north of the Oostenaula River, and a lively fight ensued, both forces using artillery; the Sixteenth was deployed as skirmishers on the right of the road; the enemy fell back to the river; no casualties reported. May 18, at 3 a. m. our lines were advanced; the enemy retreated to the south side of the river, burning the bridges, when the command went into camp on the north bank of the Oostenaula. May 19, 20, 21, in camp near Rome; no changes; nothing important transpiring. May 22, the command marched across the pontoon bridge into Rome, and crossing the Etowah by the same means, encamped on the south bank of Etowah River. May 23, moved camp about one mile south of the river this p. m. May 24, this morning
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 133 (search)
to the top of the mountain; my men being greatly exposed to the enemy's fire, our loss was heavy, having lost 30 men killed and wounded, including 1 commissioned officer. May 12, made a flank movement to the right, passing through Snake [Creek] Gap at dark. During the engagement at Resaca my regiment was held in reserve. May 15, took up position on the left of the Fifteenth Corps in the front line. May 16, the enemy having evacuated, we took up line of march in the direction of Rome, Ga. May 18, reached Rome. May 24, moved from Rome in the direction of Van Wert, marching eighteen miles, and encamped for the night at [Peak's] Spring. May 26, moved to Dallas, Ga., passing through the town and camping on the hills beyond, where we tound the enemy strongly intrenched. May 30, 1 commissoned officer wounded while on the skirmish line. June 1, abandoned our works and moved to the left. Nothing of importance transpired until the 19th. June 19, my regiment advanced as skirmishers; met
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 134 (search)
through Snake Creek Gap and toward Rome, a distance of fifteen miles, making twenty miles for the Tenth Michigan. Halted at 9 p.m. May 17, left camp at 6.30 a. m. and marched toward Rome, Ga. During the engagement which occurred near Rome, when the head of the column struck the rebel army defending the town, we were held in reserve, as our brigade was in rear of the column in the order of march. At 8.30 p. m. moved to the right and front one and a half miles, and bivouacked until morning. May 18, moved out just after daybreak in a dense fog, which rendered it impossible to see but a few rods, and formed in line of battle in rear of the picket-line, threw out skirmishers, and moved forward, obliquing to the right until we came in: sight of rebel earth-works on a hill in a strong position. We soon ascertained that these were deserted, and we moved to the top of the hill, where the enemy began shelling our line, while our skirmishers advanced to the Coosa River and found the enemy's s
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 138 (search)
g him to think that regiment constituted our entire force. When he had come sufficiently far to receive our fire from the front line he would have been enveloped on either flank. Colonel McCook asked and obtained permission to take a range of hills in his front, and in doing so wheeled to the right, and struck the enemy on the right flank, thus discovering to him some estimate of our force. He fell back at once behind his works. We intrenched our line and laid on our arms for the night. May 18, the skirmish line, under Capt. M. B. Clason, of the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio, was advanced at daylight and discovered the enemy's works evacuated. I immediately ordered the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio to occupy North Rome. May 19 to 23, remained in camp near Rome. May 23, crossed at the mouth to the south side of the Etowah River. May 24, marched toward Dallas. May 25, reached Dallas. May 26, no change. May 27, in forming line a gap of two and a half miles was discovere
1 2 3