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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 6 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
John James Geer, Beyond the lines: A Yankee prisoner loose in Dixie 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) or search for Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.113 (search)
d and his son. On Sunday, April 9th, President Lincoln reached Washington on his return from his visit to the field of operations on the Jaowing persons were tried before a military commission convened at Washington, May 9th, 1865, on the charge of conspiracy to assassinate the Prnder, orders were issued for the right and left wings to march to Washington via Richmond. On the evening before we left Raleigh the mails fry corps. After resting a few days near Richmond we started for Washington over the battle-scarred route so familiar to the men who had fougdetailed to bury the dead, and subsequently a party was sent from Washington to complete the work. We went into camp in the vicinity of AlePresident and his Cabinet. All the foreign ministers resident in Washington, the governors of the States, and many other distinguished peopleher losses. Grand reviewing stand in front of the White House, Washington, May 23-24, 1865. from a photograph. Opposing forces in Wil
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.115 (search)
ring without further delay to get out of the country, and not permit other and serious complications to be produced by his capture and imprisonment, and perhaps execution. It was determined that we should resume our march that night for Washington, Georgia, one or two days march distant, and orders were issued. by General Breckinridge to move at midnight. About 10 o'clock I received a message from General Breekinridge that he desired to see me immediately. I went to his quarters, and he inuch money seemed to banish sleep. My brigade received thirty-two dollars per capita, officers and men sharing alike. General Breckinridge was paid that sum, and, for the purpose, was borne on the roll of the brigade. On the next day, at Washington, Georgia, I turned over the residue of the treasure to Mr. M. H. Clarke, acting Treasurer of the Confederate States, and experienced a feeling of great relief. The treasure brought from Richmond included about $275,000 belonging to some Richmond
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