Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for James Longstreet or search for James Longstreet in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
two thousand were in the front line. About 12 o'clock M., General Longstreet ordered Colonel Alexander to throw a hundred shells down the inth discharge, but fortunately did no harm, though Generals Lee, Longstreet and others were standing very near it. A ten-pound Parrott then rere was but little fire from sharpshooters, Major Latrobe, of General Longstreet's staff, and Lieutenant Landry, of Maurin's battery, removed perations on other portions of Sumner's front. Along the rest of Longstreet's line, therefore, hostilities were limited to distant sharpshootes about Falmouth and below Fredericksburg rendered an advance by Longstreet even more difficult. The Sabbath was accordingly passed by each ted, however, on the front below Deep Run, and did not prevail on Longstreet's line, which continued to shell the enemy moderately until dark.of small arms was therefore near ten thousand. The casualties in Longstreet's corps were as follows:  Killed.Wounded.Missing.Total.Aggrega
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. A. Early's report of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
Conduct of the War, in speaking of the attack by Longstreet on their left says:--After we had repulsed one atrt of the Twelth corps that had been sent to meet Longstreet's attack on their left, returned and arrested his purposes and sentiments of Lee I derive from General Longstreet, who, in a full and free conversation with thonduct of Lee during this campaign.--p. 340. Longstreet, holding the right of the Confederate line, had ot of the Gettysburg position. This operation General Longstreet, who foreboded the worst from an attack on thnce of Pickett's division the day before made General Longstreet very loth to make the attack; but Lee, thinki the Union force was not all up, would not wait. Longstreet urged in reply that this advantage (or supposed as not minded to delay. My authority it again General Longstreet.--Foot-note, p. 358. These extracts will snoon, and Sickles did not take the position which Longstreet subsequently attacked until 3 P. M., while Round
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9.91 (search)
o time, not only as a matter of interest, but in order that corrections may be made if any errors are found. We are sure that Colonel Scott would esteem it a favor, if any one discovering errors would call attention to them.] right wing, or Longstreet's corps. Major-General James Longstreet. Anderson's division. Major-General R. H. Anderson. Armistead's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. L. A. Armistead. 9th Virginia. 14th Virginia. 38th Virginia. 53d Virginia. 57th Virginia. 5th Virginia BattalMajor-General James Longstreet. Anderson's division. Major-General R. H. Anderson. Armistead's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. L. A. Armistead. 9th Virginia. 14th Virginia. 38th Virginia. 53d Virginia. 57th Virginia. 5th Virginia Battalion. (?) Mahone's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. W. Mahone. 6th Virginia. 12th Virginia. 16th Virginia. 41st Virginia. 49th Virginia. Wright's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright. 3d Georgia. 22d Georgia. 44th Georgia. 48th Georgia. Jones's division. Brigadier-General D. R. Jones. Toombs's Brigade. Colonel H. L. Benning. Brig.-Gen. R. Toombs. 2d Georgia. 15th Georgia. 17th Georgia. 20th Georgia. Drayton's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. T. F. Drayton. 50th Georgia. 51st Georgia. 15th South Caro
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