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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 39: capture of the regiment. (search)
The firing in front increased, with the batteries doing good work, for the rebels. At 3 P. M. the Second and Fifth Corps were ordered to advance. Barlow's and Gibbon's divisions being formed in line of battle, it is claimed that Barlow's men fell back on receiving the attack of the enemy. The nature of the ground was such that this movement was not perceived by Gibbon, it being uneven and covered with thick underbrush. Gibbon's men stood their ground and before they were aware of the fact, the bayonets of the enemy were at their back. In a moment the rebels had captured the majority of the Nineteenth Massachusetts, together with the Fifteenth MassGibbon's men stood their ground and before they were aware of the fact, the bayonets of the enemy were at their back. In a moment the rebels had captured the majority of the Nineteenth Massachusetts, together with the Fifteenth Massachusetts, the Forty-Second and Fifty-Ninth New York, part of the Eighty-Second New York and a few men from the Twentieth Massachusetts, from the same brigade. Colonel Ansel D. Wass had been ill for some time, but rode up in an ambulance, arriving just in time to see it gobbled up by the enemy. About 30 men escaped from the
ery. Early in the afternoon the regiment was withdrawn from here and made a detour through the field before alluded to, arriving in the rear of the First Division, Gen. Miles, which occupied the works first mentioned, and lay in close support. The enemy charged at this time and were handsomely repulsed. About 3 P. M. the regiment was detached from the brigade and occupied some very slight works on the rise of the hill in rear of the cornfield, and in the rear of the first line of its own, Gibbon's, division. It was in easy range of the enemy's musketry and in full view of his artillery. The latter was not slow to take advantage of this and opened on them with his guns, and for some time the regiment was under a terrific fire of solid shot and shell. At this time the right of the troops occupying the front line of works were flanked and driven in with great confusion, and the Nineteenth, under the impression that the brigade was about to charge and endeavor to change the fortune
....................................... 104 George, Wallace T., ................................................... 183 Georgetown, ......................................................... 122 Germania Ford, Va., .................................................. 275 Germantown, ........................................................ 122 Gettysburg, Pa., ................................................... 289 Gettysburg Campaign,..............................213 to 254 Gibbon, Gen., John, ..................... 200, 217, 221, 229, 233, 239, 321, 327 Gibbons, Willam, ................................................... 248, 286 Gifford, Joseph S.,.................................................. 145 Gilbert, Delos, ........................................................ 331 Gillespie, Patrick, .................................................. 323 Glendale, Battle of, .......................................... 92, 93, 98, 99 Gloucester, Va., ....................
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