hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert Edward Lee or search for Robert Edward Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 60 results in 14 document sections:

1 2
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Maryland Warrior and hero. (search)
cally the deeds and incidents connected with the Maryland Confederates. The Maryland Line, C. S. A., was created by Act of the Confederate Congress, and consisted of infantry, cavalry and artillery, under Colonel Bradley T. Johnson, whom General R. E. Lee declared, with diffuse compliments, most worthy to command Marylanders. A grandson of Colonel Baker Johnson of the Rebellion of 1776-‘83; he had under him some fifty cousins, and not one conscript or substitute! These are my jewels. ntry, cavalry and artillery, under Colonel Bradley T. Johnson, whom General R. E. Lee declared, with diffuse compliments, most worthy to command Marylanders. A grandson of Colonel Baker Johnson of the Rebellion of 1776-‘83; he had under him some fifty cousins, and not one conscript or substitute! These are my jewels. The widow of Major Goldsborough was Miss Louise Page, of Virginia, connected with the distinguished Lee and Page families, her father being a cousin of General R. E. Lee
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dr. Samuel P. Moore. (search)
r, 1854; then to Fort Columbus, Governor's Island, New York harbor, until July, 1855, and thence to the United States Military Academy at West Point, where he remained 'till April, 1860; subsequent to which, 'till his resignation, he was the medical purveyor at New Orleans, La. Though a great lover of his country and his State, he was not a politician, and was greatly distressed in mind as to where his duty called, at the same time and in like manner with the agitation of the then Colonel Robert E. Lee, of the United States army; but when his State seceded he determined to resign his commission. He retired to Little Rock, Ark., with some intention of making that place his home, but the times were not conducive to repose, and trained officers were urgently required in all departments of the army and navy. Therefore, in response to the persistent appeals of his dearest friends, and from a high sense of duty, he concluded to answer the call made upon him as an officer of recognized
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
Had 140,000 such troops I would undertake a successful invasion of the North. An aggressive campaign. I pass by the battle of Seven Pines, as the Texas brigade were merely passive spectators in that engagement. Shortly thereafter General Robert E. Lee took command of the Confederate forces in Virginia, and thenceforward that army ceased to retreat from the foe, and began an aggressive campaign which crowned our cause with victory after victory, until the name of the Confederate soldierrried, General Lee knew no better troops upon which to rely. In truth, its signal achievements in the war of secession have never been surpassed in the history of nations. And hear what the greatest military chieftain of modern times, General Robert E. Lee, addressing General Wigfall, on the 21st of September, 1862, just after Sharpsburg, writes: General, I have not heard from you with regard to the new Texas regiments, which you promised to raise for the army. I need them very much. I re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
f, 128; Hon. R. M. T., 346. Jackson, General T. J, Orders of, 133; prowess of, 135; at Chancellorsville, 167; killing of, 169, 331. Johnson, Mrs., Anna Hayes, 33; General B. T., Services of, 35, 227, 246; Mrs. Jane Claudia, Memoir of, and monument to, 33; Hon. Wm., 33. Johnston, General J E., Orders of, 133, 280. Jones, D. D., Rev. J. Wm., 127. Kennon's Landing, Attack on, 141. Lane's Brigade, General J. H., 333. Ledbetter, M. T., 354. Lee, General, Fitzhugh. 142. Lee, General R. E., Life and Character of, 82; and Washington, a parallel, 88; Strategy of, 90; at Chambersburg, 119; at Gettysburg, 124; Surrender by. 177; peerless, 192; sublime in action, 191; did not offer his sword to Grant, 269, 309. Letcher, Governor, John, 364. Lewis, Dr Samuel E., 273. Lincoln, Assassination of, 46, 56; offered no terms, 177 call for troops in 1861, 253. Little General Henry, Burial of, 212. Lively. E. H., 177, 227. Lost Chapter, in C. S. History, The, 844. McCa
1 2