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thing, to be sure, to tell such a fable and to say that the image not only closed its eyes (just as they say the image in Troy turned away at the time Cassandra was violated) but can also be seen closing its eyes; and yet it is much bolder to represent as brought from Troy all those images which the historians say were brought from there; for not only in the territory of Siris, but also at Rome, at Lavinium, and at Luceria, Athene is called "Trojan Athena," as though brought from Troy. And fTroy. And further, the daring deed of the Trojan women is current in numerous places, and appears incredible, although it is possible. According to some, however, both Siris and the Sybaris which is on the TeuthrasThe "Teuthras" is otherwise unknown, except thdred and forty stadia from the naval station of Heracleia. It is said to have been founded by the Pylians who sailed from Troy with Nestor; and they so prospered from farming, it is said, that they dedicated a golden harvestAn ear, or sheaf, of gra
ise to the other proverb, "more healthful than Croton," the belief being that the place contains something that tends to health and bodily vigor, to judge by the multitude of its athletes. Accordingly, it had a very large number of Olympic victors, although it did not remain inhabited a long time, on account of the ruinous loss of its citizens who fell in such great numbersCp. 6. 1 10. at the River Sagra. And its fame was increased by the large number of its Pythagorean philosophers, and by Milo, who was the most illustrious of athletes, and also a companion of Pythagoras, who spent a long time in the city. It is said that once, at the common mess of the philosophers, when a pillar began to give way, Milo slipped in under the burden and saved them all, and then drew himself from under it and escaped. And it is probably because he relied upon this same strength that he brought on himself the end of his life as reported by some writers; at any rate, the story is told that once, when
to found Croton, Myscellus departed to inspect the place, but when he saw that Sybaris was already founded—having the same name as the river near by—he judged that SSybaris was better; at all events, he questioned the god again when he returned whether it would be better to found this instead of Croton, and the god replied to hiood for wild beasts. Next in order, at a distance of two hundred stadia, comes Sybaris, founded by the Achaeans; it is between two rivers, the Crathis and the SybarSybaris. Its founder was Is of Helice.The reading, "Is of Helice," is doubtful. On Helice, see 1. 3. 18 and 8. 7. 2. In early times this city was so superior in its goible, although it is possible. According to some, however, both Siris and the Sybaris which is on the TeuthrasThe "Teuthras" is otherwise unknown, except that thereording to Antiochus: Certain of the Achaeans were sent for by the Achaeans in Sybaris and resettled the place, then forsaken, but they were summoned only because of
Delphi (Greece) (search for this): book 6, chapter 1
man out of every ten Chalcidians, to Apollo,Cp. 6. 1. 9. because of a dearth of crops, but later on emigrated hither from Delphi, taking with them still others from their home. But according to Antiochus, the Zanclaeans sent for the Chalcidians and for the reason that his ancestors belongedCp. 6. 1. 6. to the god and that the colony had been sent forth from there;From Delphi to Rhegium. and although Eunomus said that the Rhegini had absolutely no right even to participate in the vocal contestsred from farming, it is said, that they dedicated a golden harvestAn ear, or sheaf, of grain made of gold, apparently. at Delphi. And writers produce as a sign of its having been founded by the Pylians the sacrifice to the shades of the sons of Neles, not to Metabus. But, as Ephorus says, the colonizer of Metapontium was Daulius, the tyrant of the Crisa which is near Delphi. And there is this further account, that the man who was sent by the Achaeans to help colonize it was Leucippus, and tha
lements, severally and in detail, are wholly without repute. Accordingly, without making distinctions between them, I shall only tell in a general way what I have learned about the peoples who live in the interior, I mean the Leucani and such of the Samnitae as are their next neighbors. Petelia, then, is regarded as the metropolis of the Chones, and has been rather populous down to the present day. It was founded by Philoctetes after he, as the result of a political quarrel, had fled from Meliboea. It has so strong a position by nature that the Samnitae once fortified it against the Thurii. And the old Crimissa, which is near the same regions, was also founded by Philoctetes. Apollodorus, in his work On Ships,That is, his work entitled "On the (Homeric) Catalogue of Ships" (cp. 1. 2. 24). in mentioning Philoctetes, says that, according to some, when Philoctetes arrived at the territory of Croton, he colonized the promontory Crimissa, and, in the interior above it, the city Chone,
d "Hyele" by the Phocaeans who founded it, and by others "Ele," after a certain spring, but is called by the men of today "Elea." This is the native city of Parmenides and Zeno, the Pythagorean philosophers. It is my opinion that not only through the leadership of Creontiades, sailed first to Cyrnus and Massalia, but when they were beaten off from those places founded Elea. Some, however, say that the city took its name from the River Elees.The Latin form is "Hales" (now the Alento). It is about two hundred stadia distant from Poseidonia. After Elea comes the promontory of Palinurus. Off the territory of Elea are two islands, the Oenotrides, which have anchoring-places. After Palinurus comes Pyxus—a cape, harbor, and river, for all tElea are two islands, the Oenotrides, which have anchoring-places. After Palinurus comes Pyxus—a cape, harbor, and river, for all three have the same name. Pyxus was peopled with new settlers by Micythus, the ruler of the Messene in Sicily, but all the settlers except a few sailed away again. After Pyxus comes another gulf, and also Laüs—a river and city; it is the last of th
Thesprotia (Greece) (search for this): book 6, chapter 1
d footnote. was killed. He, too, was deceived by the oracleThe oracle, quoted by Casaubon from some source unknown to subsequent editors was:*ai)aki/dh, profu/laco molei=n *a)xerou/sion u(/dwr*pandosi/hn d' o(/qi toi qa/natos peprwme/nos e)sti/Source unknown. "Son of Aeacus, beware to go to the Acherusian water and Pandosia, where it is fated you will die." at Dodona, which bade him be on his guard against Acheron and Pandosia; for places which bore these names were pointed out to him in Thesprotia, but he came to his end here in Brettium. Now the fortress has three summits, and the River Acheron flows past it. And there was another oracle that helped to deceive him: Three-hilled Pandosia, much people shalt thou kill one day; for he thought that the oracle clearly meant the destruction of the enemy, not of his own people. It is said that Pandosia was once the capital of the Oenotrian Kings. After Consentia comes Hipponium, which was founded by the Locrians. Later on, the Brett
, when Philoctetes arrived at the territory of Croton, he colonized the promontory Crimissa, and, inthes only a little while after the founding of Croton and Syracuse.Croton and Syracuse were founded,Sic. 4.24, Heracles had unintentionally killed Croton and had foretold the founding of a famous city of rather extended mention. The first city is Croton, within one hundred and fifty stadia from the ochus, when the god told the Achaeans to found Croton, Myscellus departed to inspect the place, but er it would be better to found this instead of Croton, and the god replied to him (MyscellusOvid Metapprove." and Myscellus came back and founded Croton, having as an associate Archias, the founder oan that Syracuse was founded immediately after Croton (cp. 6. 2. 4). Cp. also Thucydides 6. 3. 2 The Iapyges used to live at Croton in earlier times, as Ephorus says. And the city is reputed to havise to the other proverb, "more healthful than Croton," the belief being that the place contains som[4 more...]
ns who bathe in it yellow or white, and besides it cures many afflictions. Now after the Thurii had prospered for a long time, they were enslaved by the Leucani, and when they were taken away from the Leucani by the Tarantini, they took refuge in Rome, and the Romans sent colonists to supplement them, since their population was reduced, and changed the name of the city to Copiae. After Thurii comes Lagaria, a stronghold, bounded by Epeius and the Phocaeans; thence comes the Lagaritan wine, whiime Cassandra was violated) but can also be seen closing its eyes; and yet it is much bolder to represent as brought from Troy all those images which the historians say were brought from there; for not only in the territory of Siris, but also at Rome, at Lavinium, and at Luceria, Athene is called "Trojan Athena," as though brought from Troy. And further, the daring deed of the Trojan women is current in numerous places, and appears incredible, although it is possible. According to some, howe
Campania (Italy) (search for this): book 6, chapter 1
terior above it, the city Chone, from which the Chonians of that district took their name, and that some of his companions whom he had sent forth with Aegestes the Trojan to the region of Eryx in Sicily fortified Aegesta.Also spelled Segesta and Egesta. Moreover, Grumentum and Vertinae are in the interior, and so are Calasarna and some other small settlements, until we arrive at Venusia, a notable city; but I think that this city and those that follow in order after it as one goes towards Campania are Samnite cities. Beyond Thurii lies also the country that is called Tauriana. The Leucani are Samnite in race, but upon mastering the Poseidoniatae and their allies in war they took possession of their cities. At all other times, it is true, their government was democratic, but in times of war they were wont to choose a king from those who held magisterial offices. But now they are Romans. The seaboard that comes next after Leucania, as far as the Sicilian Strait and for a distance o
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