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e marched two stages, ten parasangs, to Peltae, an inhabited city. There he remained three days, during which time Xenias the Arcadian celebrated the LycaeanIn honour of Lycaean Zeus, i.e. Zeus of Mt. Lycaeus, in Arcadia. festival with sacrifice and held games; the prizes were golden strigils, and Cyrus himself was one of those who watched the games. Thence he marched two stages, twelve parasangs, to the inhabited city of Ceramon-agora,Or Tilemarket. the last Phrygian city as one goes toward Mysia. Thence he marched three stages, thirty parasangs, to Caystru-pedion,Or Ca sterfield. an inhabited city. There he remained five days. At this time he was owing the soldiers more than three months' pay, and they went again and again to his headquarters and demanded what was due them. He all the while expressed hopes, and was manifestly troubled; for it was not Cyrus' way to withhold payment when he had money. At this juncture arrived Epyaxa, the wife of Syennesis, the king“King” in name, but
Athens (Greece) (search for this): book 1, chapter 2
the heights, guarding the entrance; therefore Cyrus remained for a day in the plain. On the following day, however, a messenger came with word that Syennesis had abandoned the heights, because he had learned that Menon's army was already in Cilicia, on his own side of the mountains, and because, further, he was getting reports that triremes belonging to the LacedaemoniansCyrus had asked the Lacedaemonians “to show themselves as good friends to him as he had been to them in their war against Athens” (Xen. Hell. 2.1.1). The aid they now rendered (see also Xen. Anab. 1.4.2-3) was in response to that request. and to Cyrus himself were sailing around from Ionia to Cilicia under the command of Tamos. At any ratei.e. whether or not the reasons just given were the true ones. Cyrus climbed the mountains without meeting any opposition, and saw the camp where the Cilicians had been keeping guard. Thence he descended to a large and beautiful plain, well-watered and full of trees of all sorts and
Sardis (Turkey) (search for this): book 1, chapter 2
he had restored them to their homes. And they gladly obeyed—for they trusted him—and presented themselves, under arms, at Sardis. Xenias, then, arrived at Sardis with the troops from the cities, who were hoplites to the number of four thousand; ProxeSardis with the troops from the cities, who were hoplites to the number of four thousand; Proxenus was there with hoplites to the number of fifteen hundred, and five hundred light-armed troops; Sophaenetus the Stymphalian with a thousand hoplites; Socrates the Achaean with about five hundred hoplites; and Pasion the Megarian arrived with threest-named, and Socrates also, belonged to the force that had been engaged in besieging Miletus. All these came to Cyrus at Sardis. Meanwhile Tissaphernes had taken note of these proceedings and come to the conclusion that Cyrus' preparations were too ing heard from Tissaphernes about Cyrus' array, he set about making counter-preparations.Cyrus was now setting forth from Sardis with the troops I have mentioned; and he marched through Lydia three stages,staqmo/s = lit. a stopping-place, hence a day
Miletus (Turkey) (search for this): book 1, chapter 2
ias the Arcadian, who commanded for him the mercenary force in the cities,See Xen. Anab. 1.1.6. to come with his troops, leaving behind only so many as were necessary to garrison the citadels. He likewise summoned the troops which were besieging Miletus, and urged the Milesian exiles to take the field with him, promising them that, if he should successfully accomplish the object for which he was taking the field, he would not stop until he had restored them to their homes. And they gladly obeyes differed from ordinary light-armed troops (cp. gumnh=tas above) only in the fact that they carried a small, light shield, the pe/lph—whence their name. The last-named, and Socrates also, belonged to the force that had been engaged in besieging Miletus. All these came to Cyrus at Sardis. Meanwhile Tissaphernes had taken note of these proceedings and come to the conclusion that Cyrus' preparations were too extensive to be against the Pisidians; he accordingly made his way to the King as quickly
Tarsus (Turkey) (search for this): book 1, chapter 2
n every side, from sea to sea, by a lofty and formidable range of mountains. After descending he marched through this plain four stages, twenty-five parasangs, to Tarsus,The birth-place of the apostle Paul. a large and prosperous city of Cilicia, where the palace of Syennesis, the king of the Cilicians, was situated; and through tst, in Soli and Issus.Famous as the scene of one of the most important victories of Alexander the Great (333 B.C.). Now Epyaxa, the wife of Syennesis, had reached Tarsus five days ahead of Cyrus, but in the course of her passage over the mountains to the plain two companies of Menon's armycp. 20, above. had been lost. Some said thhe rest of the army or the roads, had thus wandered about and perished; at any rate, they numbered a hundred hoplites. And when the rest of Menon's troops reached Tarsus, in their anger over the loss of their comrades they plundered thoroughly, not only the city, but also the palace that was in it. As for Cyrus, after he had march
abandoned the heights, because he had learned that Menon's army was already in Cilicia, on his own side of the mountains, and because, further, he was getting reports that triremes belonging to the LacedaemoniansCyrus had asked the Lacedaemonians “to show themselves as good friends to him as he had been to them in their war against Athens” (Xen. Hell. 2.1.1). The aid they now rendered (see also Xen. Anab. 1.4.2-3) was in response to that request. and to Cyrus himself were sailing around from Ionia to Cilicia under the command of Tamos. At any ratei.e. whether or not the reasons just given were the true ones. Cyrus climbed the mountains without meeting any opposition, and saw the camp where the Cilicians had been keeping guard. Thence he descended to a large and beautiful plain, well-watered and full of trees of all sorts and vines; it produces an abundance of sesame, millet, panic, wheat, and barley, and it is surrounded on every side, from sea to sea, by a lofty and formidable range
Iconium (Turkey) (search for this): book 1, chapter 2
o day from sutlers who accompanied the army. The commander's duty ended with “providing a market” (a)gora\n pare/xein). left their wares behind and took to their heels; while the Greeks with a roar of laughter came up to their camp. Now the Cilician queen was filled with admiration at beholding the brilliant appearance and the order of the Greek army; and Cyrus was delighted to see the terror with which the Greeks inspired the barbarians. Thence he marched three stages, twenty parasangs, to Iconium, the last city of Phrygia. There he remained three days. Thence he marched through Lycaonia five stages, thirty parasangs. This country he gave over to the Greeks to plunder, on the ground that it was hostile territory.In leaving Phrygia Cyrus was passing beyond the limits of his own satrapy. Introd. p. viii. From there Cyrus sent the Cilician queen back to Cilicia by the shortest route, and he sent some of Menon's troops to escort her, Menon himself commanding them. With the rest of th
Cappadocia (Turkey) (search for this): book 1, chapter 2
ere he remained three days. Thence he marched through Lycaonia five stages, thirty parasangs. This country he gave over to the Greeks to plunder, on the ground that it was hostile territory.In leaving Phrygia Cyrus was passing beyond the limits of his own satrapy. Introd. p. viii. From there Cyrus sent the Cilician queen back to Cilicia by the shortest route, and he sent some of Menon's troops to escort her, Menon himself commanding them. With the rest of the army Cyrus marched through Cappadocia four stages, twenty-five parasangs, to Dana, an inhabited city, large and prosperous. There they remained three days; and during that time Cyrus put to death a Persian named Megaphernes, who was a wearer of the royal purple,A title of honour at the Persian court. and another dignitary among his subordinates, on the charge that they were plotting against him. From there they made ready to try to enter Cilicia. Now the entrance was by a wagon-road, exceedingly steep and impracticable for an
Arcadia (Greece) (search for this): book 1, chapter 2
about two thousand peltasts.Here used in the general sense, i.e. to include all kinds of light-armed troops; cp. note on 3 above. Xenophon here uses round numbers. The exact totals, according to the figures previously given, are 10,600 hoplites and 2,300 light-armed troops. Thence he marched two stages, ten parasangs, to Peltae, an inhabited city. There he remained three days, during which time Xenias the Arcadian celebrated the LycaeanIn honour of Lycaean Zeus, i.e. Zeus of Mt. Lycaeus, in Arcadia. festival with sacrifice and held games; the prizes were golden strigils, and Cyrus himself was one of those who watched the games. Thence he marched two stages, twelve parasangs, to the inhabited city of Ceramon-agora,Or Tilemarket. the last Phrygian city as one goes toward Mysia. Thence he marched three stages, thirty parasangs, to Caystru-pedion,Or Ca sterfield. an inhabited city. There he remained five days. At this time he was owing the soldiers more than three months' pay, and they we
Cilicia (Turkey) (search for this): book 1, chapter 2
imits of his own satrapy. Introd. p. viii. From there Cyrus sent the Cilician queen back to Cilicia by the shortest route, and he sent some of Menon's troops to escort her, Menon himself commandi, on the charge that they were plotting against him. From there they made ready to try to enter Cilicia. Now the entrance was by a wagon-road, exceedingly steep and impracticable for an army to pass at Syennesis had abandoned the heights, because he had learned that Menon's army was already in Cilicia, on his own side of the mountains, and because, further, he was getting reports that triremes b.4.2-3) was in response to that request. and to Cyrus himself were sailing around from Ionia to Cilicia under the command of Tamos. At any ratei.e. whether or not the reasons just given were the truey-five parasangs, to Tarsus,The birth-place of the apostle Paul. a large and prosperous city of Cilicia, where the palace of Syennesis, the king of the Cilicians, was situated; and through the middle
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