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C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Sir Richard Francis Burton) 2 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 2 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. Gilbert Murray) 2 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 2 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill). You can also browse the collection for Bithynia (Turkey) or search for Bithynia (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 29 results in 13 document sections:

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E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 35 (search)
nvitation to an otherwise unknown poet, Caecilius of Como, to visit Catullus at Verona, with incidentally a little pleasantry about a love-affair of Caecilius, and a neat compliment about his forthcoming poem. This address could not have been written before 59 B.C. (cf. v. 4 n.), and was written while Catullus was at Verona. Two occasions only are surely known on which he was at his ancestral home after 59, once immediately on his return from Bithynia in the summer of 56, and again somewhat more than a year later, a few months before his death. The poem may well date from one or the other of these periods.—Meter, Phalaecean. tenero: as a writer of love-poetry; cf. Ovid (with whom it is a favorite word) Ov. Ars Am. 3.333 teneri carmen Properti ; Ov. Rem. Am. 757 teneros ne tange poetas ; Mart. 4.14.13 tener Catullus
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 46 (search)
Farewell to Bithynia! An unmatched expression of pure joy at the prospect of home-coming. Written in the spring of 56 B.C., when Catullus was concluding his year of absence in Bithynia with Memmius (see Intr. 29ff.). The other poems of this little cycle are Catul. 31.1ff. and Catul. 4.1ff.Bithynia with Memmius (see Intr. 29ff.). The other poems of this little cycle are Catul. 31.1ff. and Catul. 4.1ff.—Meter, Phalaecean. egelidos: the prefix here has the privative meaning, as in Colum. 10.282 nunc ver egelidum, nunc est mollissimus annus ; but the prefix is intensive in Verg. A. 8.610 procul egelido secretum flumine vidit. Phrygii campi: cf. Catul. 31.5 Bithynos campos . Nicaeae: Strabo (12.564) says of Nicaea, the capital of Bithynia, Strabo XII. 564 perikei=tai de\ ku/klw| pedi/on me/ga (cf. Phrigii campi) kai\ sfo/dra eu)/daimon, (cf.ager ub
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 63 (search)
votary back to his allegiance (vv. 74-fin.). The story is told with a nervous vigor and swing of feeling that are unequalled in Latin literature, and to it the galliambic meter (Intr. 85), the one traditionally appropriated to such themes, lends great effect. The date of composition is uncertain, but Catullus may have found his immediate inspiration in his contact with the Cybelian worship in its original home during his residence in Bithynia in 57-56 B.C. (see Intr. 29ff.). Or it may have been found in his studies in the Alexandrian poets; for Callimachus certainly used the galliambic meter, though no distinct title of a poem by him on this theme is extant. Caecilius of Comum was also engaged on a poem based on the worship of Cybele (cf. Catul. 35.13ff.), and Varro and Maecenas both exercised their talents in the same direction (cf. Varr. Sat. Men. l. c.; Maec. in
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