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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 400 AD - 499 AD or search for 400 AD - 499 AD in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PALATINUS MONS (search)
erable part of the hill was occupied by streets and private buildings (the Notitia gives 20 vici, 89 domus, 2642 (or 2742) insulae) ; and the removal of the imperial residence to Byzantium meant the beginning of the end. Constantius, it is true, was 'in Palatium receptus ' when he visited Rome in 356 A.D. (Amm. Marcell. xvi. 10. 13). We know very little about the FORUM PALATINUM (q.v.) which was given to the Roman people by Valentinian I and his colleagues in 374 A.D. The emperors of the fifth century also resided on the Palatine when in Rome-Honorius (Claudian, Sext. Cons. Hon. 35), Valentinian III (Marccll. com. ad a. 434 in Chron. Min. ii. 79, Aetius (ibid. i. 303; ii. 27, 86, 157), Livius Severus (ibid. ii. 158), as well as Odoacer and Theodoric; the latter restored the Palatine, as well as the walls of the city, with funds from the arca vinaria (ibid. i. 324), and Cassiodorus, Var. vii. 5. 5, enumerates the workmen employed; while several brick-stamps of Theodoric have been found
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, AD PALMAM (search)
AD PALMAM a name that seems to have been used from the fifth or sixth century for the area between the Curia and the arch of Septimius Severus (Anom. Vales. 66 in Chron. Min. i. 324 (517 A.D.): venit ad senatum et ad Palmam populo adlocutus; Acta S. Restituti AA. SS. May 29, c. 12). This area had previously been called TRIA FATA (q.v.), and was undoubtedly identical with the Palma Aurea of Fulgentius (Acta S. Fulgentii AA. SS. Jan. vol. i. p. 37, c. 13: in loco qui palma aurea dicitur). The DOMUS PALMATA (q.v.) has been wrongly placed here (BC 1887, 64-66) : see supra, 187 and add.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PONS SUBLICIUS (search)
certain. and it was constructed of wood without metal of any sort whatsoever (Plut. loc. cit.; Dionys. iii. 45; ix. 68; Plin. NH xxxvi. 100; Serv. ad Aen. viii. 646). It was under the direct care of the college of pontiffs, its preservation was a matter of religion, and any injury caused by floods was regarded as a prodigium. Such injuries seem to have been not infrequent (Cass. Dio xxxvii. 58; 1. 8; liii. 33; Iv. 22), but the bridge was always repaired and was standing as late as the fifth century (Hist. Aug. Ant. Pii 8; Not. app.; Mythol. Vat. i. 74). It is represented on a coin of Antoninus (Cohen, Ant. Pius No. 127) with the contest of Romans and Etruscans, and Horatius swimming in the river. There is no doubt about the antiquity of the bridge, and its method of construction is generally regarded as evidence that it dated from the period before the inhabitants of Latium had developed the working of iron far enough for use in bridge building, a period that may perhaps correspond
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PORTICUS ILICII (search)
PORTICUS ILICII built in the fifth century by the presbyter Ilicius on the vicus Patricius, between the early church of S. Pudenziana and the site of the later S. Lorenzo in Fonte. Some remains still exist under the houses in the Via del Bambin Gesi (LR 393; HJ 340; BCr 1867, 53).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SEP. ROMULI (1) (search)
to certain rites to be performed by the king or perhaps by those in attendance on the king in the comitium. To attempt to define it further would be useless, as we do not even know how much of the cippus is lost.' As to the date, he fixes it about 500 B.C., as being slightly later than the fibula of Praeneste (ib. 3). Cf. also AJP 1907, 249-272, 373-400. The freshness of the surface may be explained by the fact that it was covered with stucco. (2) a conical column of tufa dating from the fifth century. (3) the so-called sacellum-consisting of (a) a rectangular foundation of one course of tufa blocks, on which rest two bases, each 2.66 metres long and I.31 broad; these support pedestals of tufa with curved profiles, probably to be reconstructed similarly to the altar of VERMINUS (q.v.). These pedestals might very well have supported the statues of recumbent lions. Between them is a block of stone, on which the original niger lapis may have stood. (b) another small platform of tufa bl
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, THERMAE ANTONINIANAE (CARACALLAE) (search)
THERMAE ANTONINIANAE (CARACALLAE) * (Capsararius de Antoninianas (sic) in (CIL vi. 9232) a fifth (?) century inscription): the thermae built by Caracalla on the VIA NOVA (q.v.), which he constructed parallel to and on. the right of the via Appia, a little beyond the porta Capena. Hier. ad Euseb. a. Abr. 2231: Antoninus Romae thermas sui nominis aedificavit, fixes the date of their dedication as 216 A.D. Breval, Remarks on Several Parts of Europe, Ser. I (1726), ii. 259, saw the letters ....ct not mentioned in CIL). , while we have dedicatory inscriptions upon the bases of statues set up by the praefectus urbi to Victoria and to the victorious emperors Valentinian and Valens towards the end of it (CIL vi. 794, 1170-1173). In the fifth century the baths are named among the marvels of Rome (Pol. Silv. 545; Olympiod. ap. Phot. p. 63a Bekk.: ai( de\ )*antwnianai\ ... ei)s xrwi/an tw=n louome/nwn kaqe/e/drass ei)=xon parakaime/nas xili/as e(cakosi/ase)c narna/rou kateskeuasme/nas cest
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, THERMAE TRAIANI (search)
v. 33; liii. 9; Mel. 1886, 3-4; BC 1886, 245; Mon. L. i. 484-485). In Trajan's time they were used by women (Chron. 146:hoc imperatore mulieres in thermis Traianis laverunt); little images (sigillaria) were exposed for sale in the porticus of the thermae in the last days of the Saturnalia (which were sometimes called Sigillaria from this practice; see SIGILLARIA) (Schol. ad Iuv. 6. 154); they are mentioned incidentally in inscriptions (vi. 9797=AL 29. 4; 8677, 8678); and in the fourth or fifth century they were adorned with statues by Iulius Felix Campanianus, prefect of the city (CIL vi. 1670). The correct name was attached to the gradually diminishing ruins until about the sixteenth century, when it was displaced by the incorrect name, thermae Titianae. Part of these baths is represented on a fragment of the Marble Plan (109; cf. Lanciani quoted by Gatti, BC 1886, 272-274), and in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries drawings and plans were made of the existing ruins-the most imp
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