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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome.

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AIUS LOCUTIUS, ARA an altar erected in 390 B.C. by order of the senate at the north corner of the Palatine in infima Nova via, opposite the grove of Vesta. It was dedicated to the deus indiges, Aius Locutius (Loquens, Cic. de div. ii. 69), the speaking voice. Tradition agreed in relating that in 391 a plebeian, M. Caedicius, heard at night at this point a voice that warned the Romans of the invasion of the Gauls. No attention was paid to this warning until after the event, when the altar was built in expiation (Cic. de div. i. 101 ; ii. 69; Varro ap. Gell. xvi. 17; Liv. v. 32. 6, 50. 5, 52. I I; Plut. Cam. 30: vew\n fh/mhs kai\ klhdo/nos: de fort. Rom. 5: e(/dh). Besides ara, this altar is also referred to as saceUum (Liv. v. 32) and templum (ib. v. 50, 52), but there is no doubt that it was an enclosed altar in the open air. This altar has no connection with that found on the south-west slope of the Palatine near the Velabrum, dedicated sive deo sive deivae (CIL i 2. 801 =
AMICITIA, ARA an altar erected in 28 A.D. by order of the senate, dedicated to the amicitia of Tiberius, probably as illustrated in the case of Sejanus (Tac. Ann. iv. 74: ita quamquam diversis super rebus consulerentur, aram clementiae, aram amicitiae effigiesque circum Caesaris ac Seiani censuere; cf. Wissowa, Rel. 337). Its site is entirely unknown.
rior wall consisted of three stories of open arcades, adorned with pilasters and Corinthian capitals. When the Aurelian wall was built, the amphitheatre was utilized as a part of the line of fortification, the wall being joined to it in the middle of the east and west sides. The outer half of the building was thus made a projecting bastion, and the open arcades of the exterior were walled up, the ground level outside being at the same time lowered. The inner half was evidently pulled down, so that little use can have been made of the edifice at that time. Drawings of the sixteenth century represent all three stories, but since that time the upper one has entirely disappeared and all but a few fragments of the second. The cavea and the wall of the arena have also been destroyed, so that the remaining portion consists of the walled-up arcades of the lowest story (HJ. 248-249; RE iii. 1773; LR 386; LS iii. 164; DuP 132). See Ill. 1, which shows its condition in 1615; ASA 96.
transferred to the amphitheatre until after 1000 A.D. (HCh 265, 380, 394, 426; HFP 52; BC 1926, 53-64). built by Vespasian, in the depression between the Velia, the Esquiline and the Caelian, a site previously occupied by the stagnum of Nero's domus Aurea(Suet. Vesp. 9; Mart. de spect. 2. 5; Aur. Vict. Caes. 9. 7). Vespasian carried the structure to the top of the second arcade of the outer wall and of the maenianum secundum of the cavea (see below), and dedicated it before his death in 79 A.D. (Chronogr. a. 354, P. 146). Titus added the third and fourth stories The word used is 'gradus,' which applies to the interior; Vespasian may, Hulsen thinks, have completed a great part of the Corinthian order of the exterior. (ib.), and celebrated the dedication of the enlarged building in 80 with magnificent games that lasted one hundred days (Suet. Titus 7; Cass. Dio lxvi. 25; Hieron. a. Abr. 2095; Eutrop. vii. 21; Cohen, Tit. 399, 400). Domitian is said to have completed the building
AMPHITHEATRUM FLAVIUM * ordinarily known as the Colosseum, For the name see COLOSSUS NERONIS: it was not transferred to the amphitheatre until after 1000 A.D. (HCh 265, 380, 394, 426; HFP 52; BC 1926, 53-64). built by Vespasian, in the depression between the Velia, the Esquiline and the Caelian, a site previously occupied by the stagnum of Nero's domus Aurea(Suet. Vesp. 9; Mart. de spect. 2. 5; Aur. Vict. Caes. 9. 7). Vespasian carried the structure to the top of the second arcade of the outer wall and of the maenianum secundum of the cavea (see below), and dedicated it before his death in 79 A.D. (Chronogr. a. 354, P. 146). Titus added the third and fourth stories The word used is 'gradus,' which applies to the interior; Vespasian may, Hulsen thinks, have completed a great part of the Corinthian order of the exterior. (ib.), and celebrated the dedication of the enlarged building in 80 with magnificent games that lasted one hundred days (Suet. Titus 7; Cass. Dio lxvi. 25; Hier
v. 42). The last gladiatorial combats occurred in 404 (Theodoret v. 26). The Colosseum was injured by an earthquake in the pontificate of Leo IV (in 847). In the eleventh and twelfth centuries houses and isolated 'cryptae ' within the Colosseum are frequently mentioned in documents of the archives of S. Maria Nova, as though it were already in ruins (Arch. Soc. Rom. St. Patr. xxiii. (1900) 204, 216; xxv. (1902) ; xxvi. (1903) 38, 41, 57, 79). Gradual destruction continued until the eighteenth century, while the work of restoration has gone on intermittently since the beginning of the nineteenth (De Angelis, Relazione 8-15). The north side of the outer wall is standing, comprising the arches numbered xxiii to LIV, with that part of the building which is between it and the inner wall supporting the colonnade, and practically the whole skeleton of the structure between this inner wall and the arena-that is, the encircling and radiating walls on which the cavea with its marble seats re
of the Corinthian order, and its arches are 6.40 metres high. Above this is a third entablature and attic. In each of the second and third arcades was a statue. The attic above the third arcade is 2.10 metres high, and is pierced by small rectangular windows over every second arch. On it rests the upper division of the wall, which is solid and adorned with flat Corinthian pilasters in place of the half-columns of the lower arcades, but shows numerous traces of rude reconstruction in the third century (Lanciani, Destruction of Ancient Rome, figs. 9, 10). Above the pilasters is an entablature, and between every second pair of pilasters is a window cut through the wall- Cf. Mitt. 1897, 334-; 1925, 30-33. In the remaining spaces between the pilasters the clipea were fixed (Colagrossi, Anfiteatro Flavio, 45-47: 257-264). (see below, p. 9). Above these openings is a row of consoles-three between each pair of pilasters. In these consoles are sockets for the masts which projected upward th
ct the spectators from the attacks of the wild beasts, and behind it a narrow passage paved with marble. Above this passage was the podium, a platform raised about 4 metres above the arena, on which were placed the marble chairs of the most distinguished spectators. These chairs seem to have been assigned to corporations and officials, not to individuals as such, until the time of Constantine, when they began to be assigned to families an rarely to individuals. This continued until the fifth century, when possession by individuals became more common. The names of these various owners were cut in the pavement of the podium, on the seats themselves, and above the cornice, and many of these inscriptions have been preserved (CIL vi. 32099-32248; BC 1880, 211-282). When a seat passed from one owner to another, the old name was erased and a new one substituted. The front of the podium was protected by a bronze balustrade. From the podium It should be added that the wall with niches is
us. Lugli assigns it to Domitian (Mem. Am. Acad. cit.). In the substructures are traces of dens for wild beasts, elevators, and mechanical appliances of various sorts, and provision was made for the drainage of the water which flows so abundantly into this hollow and which was carried off in a sewer connecting with that running under the via S. Gregorio (Narducci, Fognatura della Citta di Roma 65-70 and pl. 14; see Ill. 5). The masonry of the substructures dates from the first century to the end of the fifth>/date>. The statement in the Regionary Catalogue (Reg. III), that the amphitheatre had 87,000 loca, cannot refer to persons but pedes, and even so, it is probably incorrect, for the total seating capacity cannot have exceeded forty-five thousand (BC 1894, 312-324), with standing room on the roof for about five thousand more. Nine published fragments of the Marble Plan (FUR 55, 69, 13 a-g) represent parts of the amphitheatre, and there are a few others of little importance and unc
AMPHITHEATRUM STATILII TAURI an amphitheatre built of stone by L. Statilius Taurus in 29 B.C., probably in the southern part of the campus Martius (Cass. Dio li. 23; Suet. Aug. 29; Cal. 18; Caligula is said to have looked upon it with scorn (Cass. Dio lix. 10), perhaps on account of its small size. Tac. Ann. iii. 72; Strabo, v. 3. 8, p. 236; CIL vi. 6226-6228). It was burned in 64 A.D. (Cass. Dio lxii. 18), and Nero built another (q.v.) on the same site (HJ 496; cf. 595, HCh 197 for the church of S. Angeli de domo Egidii a Poco, not de Rota, as Lanciani (Forma 14) and Armellini 2 363 believed).
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