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Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
s that came from South Carolina and Georgia, that there is danger of a like error. Among those troops was Lawton's brigade. Now Lawton did not come directly to Richmond from the South. When he reached Burkeville, on his way to Richmond, General Lee was about to cover the contemplated movement against General McClellan, by creating the impression that Jackson was to be reinforced, so as to resume the offensive in the Valley. For this purpose, Lawton was sent from Burkeville, by way of Lynchburg, to join Jackson near Staunton, and Whiting's division, of two brigades, was detached from the army before Richmond. Both Lawton and Whiting joined Jackson, and formed part of the command with which he came to Richmond and engaged in the Seven Days battle. (See Jackson's Report, volume 1, p. 129, Reports of Army of Northern Virginia, where it will be seen that Lawton was attached to Jackson's division.) This fact should be borne in mind in estimating the strength of General Lee's army, b
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
der Major-General Holmes; twenty-two thousand men from South Carolina and Georgia, and above sixteen thousand men from the tles, amounted to 15,000 men. As to the 22,000 from South Carolina and Georgia, General Johnston says: General Riplusand men who we are informed came to General Lee from South Carolina and Georgia to aid in driving McClellan from the Chick nine thousand to make up the twenty-two thousand from South Carolina and Georgia. It may have been so. There may have beturn out to be a small command under General Evans, of South Carolina, who did not join the army until after it moved from Rral Johnston as to the number of troops that came from South Carolina and Georgia, that there is danger of a like error. Amigade, of which I do not know the strength.22,000 from South Carolina and Georgia, and above 16,000 from the Valley, in the 17th of September, 1862. Evans' brigade arrived from South Carolina in July, 1862, and its strength was 2,200. This must
Ripley (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
t's division, 6 in A. P. Hill's division, 5 in D. H. Hill's division, including Ripley's brigade; 6 in Magruder's command, 4 in Huger's division, including Ransom's bgades, and Lawton's brigade — the twelve brigades added after Seven Pines being Ripley's, Lawton's, Ransom's, J. G. Walker's, Daniel's, Wise's (2 regiments), and the lume of the Reports of the Opetions of the Army of Northern Virginia for 1862. Ripley's was the first brigade that arrived, and in his report (page 234) he says: Thend before the Seven Days Battles, consisted of those brought by Holmes (9,296), Ripley's brigade (2,366), and Lawton's (3,500)--in all 15,162, instead of the 37,000 ywill show that we lost 4,000 out of 10,000 taken into the field. This includes Ripley's brigade. General Magruder says, on page 190: I was in command of three divng this according to Ewell's statement on page 189, and then adding the loss in Ripley's brigade at Mechanicsville before Jackson got up, and we have the entire loss
South Mountain, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
l Alexander, the history of the regiments composing Drayton's brigade is given. Coming to Virginia after the Seven Days Battles it. of course, had no effect in increasing General Lee's numbers at these battles. There is some strange mistake on your part, or that of General Drayton, about the brigade. If it had 7,000 men in it when it came here, then the three regiments and the battalion composing it must have averaged 1,750 men each. It lost only 93 men at Second Manassas, and 541 at South Mountain and Sharpsburg — in all, 634. Yet it was in a division of six brigades, commanded by D. R. Jones at Sharpsburg, and in his report (page 219, 2d volume, Reports,) he says that in his six brigades there were only 2,430 men on the morning of the 17th of September, 1862. Evans' brigade arrived from South Carolina in July, 1862, and its strength was 2,200. This must have been the brigade which you could not name, as no others than those mentioned came from the South during that summer. Th
Maryland Line (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
only thirty-five?) was subsequently taken from him, one of my regiments was taken to supply its place, and make his brigade something like equal to the others, though the largest number I had been able to get together in my brigade was about one thousand eight hundred. The Second Virginia cavalry came with Jackson, and the fact is that the whole command that came from the Valley, including the artillery, the regiment of cavalry, and the Maryland regiment and a battery, then known as the Maryland line, could not have exceeded eight thousand men. With Whiting's two brigades, and Lawton's brigade, which came with Jackson, the entire force of the latter may have been in the neighborhood of 16,000; but Whiting's command constituted a part of the army when you left it, and Lawton's brigade has already been counted with the troops brought from the South. So that the whole force received by General Lee from all sources was about 23,000--about 30,000 less than your estimate. Now, let us s
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
d and engaged in the Seven Days battle. (See Jackson's Report, volume 1, p. 129, Reports of Army oe it will be seen that Lawton was attached to Jackson's division.) This fact should be borne in mincounted as part of the 22,000. or as part of Jackson's command. Whiting should not be counted amo active and harassing campaign in the Valley, Jackson's having fought at Kernstown, McDowell, Middlthey had seen nothing like as hard service as Jackson's and Ewell's; yet the report of the strength 1,135 in it. That was the largest brigade in Jackson's division, and, indeed, the other two were se small — give 2,000 for each; and then, with Jackson's and Ewell's 8,000, we will have: Longstreetin A. P. Hill's division, 3,870--page 179; in Jackson's command, composed of his own division, incll's division, 3,870; Huger's division, 2,129; Jackson's command, 6,727; Magruder's command, 2,236; Lee certainly received accessions, including Jackson's command, to the extent of about 23,000 men;[2 more...]
Mechanicsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
er the Battle of Seven Pines, were ordered immediately to the front, and performed picket and out-post duty, with slight intermission, until the march towards Mechanicsville. Two of the regiments — the First and Third North Carolina--had been some time in service, but not in action. The Forty-fourth and Forty-eighth Georgia wereys, page 256: I have the honor to report that on the evening of the 26th of June, by direction of Major-General Hill, I marched my brigade, 1,228 strong, into Mechanicsville. The other brigade commanders do not give their strength. Field's brigade was a small one, Gregg's not large, and Anderson's and Branch's were perhaps about own) is put for that in Ewell's entire division. Correcting this according to Ewell's statement on page 189, and then adding the loss in Ripley's brigade at Mechanicsville before Jackson got up, and we have the entire loss in the troops that were under his command as above stated.] In Magruder's command, McLaws gives his loss at
Ripleys (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
the battles around Richmond during the Seven days. General Holmes there says: That upon crossing the James river he was joined on the 30th June by General Wise with two regiments of seven hundred and fifty-two bayonets and two batteries of artillery, and adds: The effective force under my orders thus amounted to six thousand infantry and six batteries of artillery, being less by nine thousand infantry then General Johnston's narrative assigns to General Holmes. General Johnston says that Ripley's brigade was five thousand strong, and that General Ripley so informed him. There may have been that number of men borne upon the rolls of the brigade, but we have General Ripley's official report of the number of troops under his command that actually took part in the battles around Richmond. At page 234, volume 1 of the official report already referred to, General Ripley says: The aggregate force which entered into the series of engagements on the 26th of June was twenty-three
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
had marched northwards upon a new campaign. He will find no trace of this brigade in the reports of the Seven Days battle, although they are so much in detail as to include the reports of captains of companies. A Confederate brigade, seven thousand strong, would probably have taken some part worth reporting, and its name ought to appear in the official account. Drayton's command will be found mentioned in the official reports of subsequent operations of the army at Manassas and in Maryland. As to the unknown brigade, that I think will turn out to be a small command under General Evans, of South Carolina, who did not join the army until after it moved from Richmond. Note.--It is proper to remark that the army around Richmond received a larger reinforcement from North Carolina than the number given in General Holmes' official report. General Holmes had under his command in North Carolina four brigades, which afterwards came to Virginia, and which are no doubt the troop
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
hich I had commanded, fifteen thousand men from North Carolina, under Major-General Holmes; twenty-two thousand Richmond received a larger reinforcement from North Carolina than the number given in General Holmes' officiort. General Holmes had under his command in North Carolina four brigades, which afterwards came to Virginiof six regiments, one of which, the Forty-eight North Carolina, was transferred to Walker's brigade. Ransom'ss statement that fifteen thousand men came from North Carolina, under General Holmes, is therefore calculated ld not be included in the troops that came from North Carolina, under Holmes, because that brigade was with th number into General Lee's army.15,000 men from North Carolina, under General Holmes; General Ripley gave ntry at Sharpsburg, Daniel's having returned to North Carolina, Wise's being left near Richmond, and Drayton'sad previously been with the army, returned from North Carolina after the commencement of the battles. It re
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