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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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Hays (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
These notices might be multiplied, but it is unnecessary. A vacancy occurring in the rank of brigadier-general, a great many of the Texas journals testified their good — will by expressing the hope that General Johnston would be appointed to it; a fact which is now mentioned merely to show their satisfaction with his administration on their frontier. The following instance is given as an illustration of General Johnston's mode of dealing with the people of the frontier. The citizens of Hays and Comal Counties joined in a petition to General Johnston, requesting him to station a force to protect their settlements. To their spokesman, Judge William E. Jones, General Johnston sent the following reply: San Antonio, Texas, December 1, 1S56. dear sir: Your letter in relation to the exposed condition of the settlements between the Guadalupe and Pedernalis Rivers, embracing those of the Blanco, has been received. Captain Bradfute, Second Cavalry, with the effective strength of
Oklahoma (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ell me fresh milk for my sick baby at any price; for, said he, that milk has butter in it. After it is churned, if you will send for it, I will sell it to you. No further effort was made with him, not even a remonstrance. The supremacy of law over force was fully recognized. The incident is trifling in itself, but it has its value. The route from Jefferson Barracks lay through the Ozark Mountains, in Southwestern Missouri, and passed by the way of Springfield and Neosho into the Indian Territory. Reaching Talequah, November 28th, and traveling by Fort Gibson and Fort Washita, they entered Texas at Preston on the 15th of December. From Preston the column moved to Belknap, and thence to Fort Mason, its destination, where it arrived January 14, 1856. Four companies were left on the Clear Fork of the Brazos, under Major Hardee. In this march they forded many rivers, and suffered three weeks of the coldest weather ever felt in Texas. While still on the elevated table-lands,
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
perfect composure, and delayed his acceptance until he had surveyed the case in every possible bearing. The citizens of Austin tendered him a public supper and ball, as an unostentatious display of genuine feeling and respect for a distinguished public servant. But a still more gratifying evidence of the public estimation was the confidence inspired on that whole frontier, that his presence in command there was a sufficient guarantee of its safety. On May 19th he was ordered to Louisville, Kentucky; and, by telegram, on June 29th, to report at Washington City. When General Johnston was ordered on, it was not expected that his regiment would be filled for some time; and both he and Colonel Lee were directed to proceed to Fort Leavenworth, to sit on a general court-martial, to be held September 24th. Recruiting for the army had been slow, and often from an undesirable class of persons. But now, owing to the increase of pay, the prospect of a life of active adventure on the P
Fort Gibson (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ilk has butter in it. After it is churned, if you will send for it, I will sell it to you. No further effort was made with him, not even a remonstrance. The supremacy of law over force was fully recognized. The incident is trifling in itself, but it has its value. The route from Jefferson Barracks lay through the Ozark Mountains, in Southwestern Missouri, and passed by the way of Springfield and Neosho into the Indian Territory. Reaching Talequah, November 28th, and traveling by Fort Gibson and Fort Washita, they entered Texas at Preston on the 15th of December. From Preston the column moved to Belknap, and thence to Fort Mason, its destination, where it arrived January 14, 1856. Four companies were left on the Clear Fork of the Brazos, under Major Hardee. In this march they forded many rivers, and suffered three weeks of the coldest weather ever felt in Texas. While still on the elevated table-lands, some sixty miles northeast of Fort Belknap, the regiment was caught
Mason (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
, and traveling by Fort Gibson and Fort Washita, they entered Texas at Preston on the 15th of December. From Preston the column moved to Belknap, and thence to Fort Mason, its destination, where it arrived January 14, 1856. Four companies were left on the Clear Fork of the Brazos, under Major Hardee. In this march they forded mam Belknap they encountered hail, snow, and sleet; and both men and animals suffered severely. A train on its way from the coast to meet them lost 113 oxen. At Fort Mason, as the accommodations were insufficient for the comfort of the officers' families, General Johnston reserved only one small room for his own family. Soon aftdence of the people, he received that justice at their hands which is not always accorded to commanders, even when deserving. When General Johnston reached Fort Mason, the border was full of terror. The year 1855 had been one of unusual disaster and suffering. The Indians had murdered and pillaged as far down as the Blanco,
Neosho, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
. A man refused to sell me fresh milk for my sick baby at any price; for, said he, that milk has butter in it. After it is churned, if you will send for it, I will sell it to you. No further effort was made with him, not even a remonstrance. The supremacy of law over force was fully recognized. The incident is trifling in itself, but it has its value. The route from Jefferson Barracks lay through the Ozark Mountains, in Southwestern Missouri, and passed by the way of Springfield and Neosho into the Indian Territory. Reaching Talequah, November 28th, and traveling by Fort Gibson and Fort Washita, they entered Texas at Preston on the 15th of December. From Preston the column moved to Belknap, and thence to Fort Mason, its destination, where it arrived January 14, 1856. Four companies were left on the Clear Fork of the Brazos, under Major Hardee. In this march they forded many rivers, and suffered three weeks of the coldest weather ever felt in Texas. While still on the e
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
yed the case in every possible bearing. The citizens of Austin tendered him a public supper and ball, as an unostentatious display of genuine feeling and respect for a distinguished public servant. But a still more gratifying evidence of the public estimation was the confidence inspired on that whole frontier, that his presence in command there was a sufficient guarantee of its safety. On May 19th he was ordered to Louisville, Kentucky; and, by telegram, on June 29th, to report at Washington City. When General Johnston was ordered on, it was not expected that his regiment would be filled for some time; and both he and Colonel Lee were directed to proceed to Fort Leavenworth, to sit on a general court-martial, to be held September 24th. Recruiting for the army had been slow, and often from an undesirable class of persons. But now, owing to the increase of pay, the prospect of a life of active adventure on the Plains, and other motives, the cavalry regiments were rapidly rec
America (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ple of the frontier — a state of affairs very rare indeed. He was keenly alive to the duty intrusted to him — the defense of the frontier. It was a subject that had engaged his interest and sympathy for twenty years, and the field of operations was perfectly familiar to him. His command was a force more suitable for service than had formerly been employed, and his orders were carried out by as able and enterprising a body of officers and men as has ever been collected into one regiment in America. Enjoying, too, very fully, the confidence of the people, he received that justice at their hands which is not always accorded to commanders, even when deserving. When General Johnston reached Fort Mason, the border was full of terror. The year 1855 had been one of unusual disaster and suffering. The Indians had murdered and pillaged as far down as the Blanco, within twenty miles of Austin, and even below San Antonio, in September. The arrival of the Second Cavalry changed the aspe
Austin (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
hough he had served with the rangers in Texas; but his professional knowledge was wide, and his special tastes inclined him to that arm of the service, so that he felt no difficulty in accepting the promotion. The writer was with him when he received, at Fort McKavitt, the notification of this fact; and, though his heart's desire was gratified by it, he learned it with perfect composure, and delayed his acceptance until he had surveyed the case in every possible bearing. The citizens of Austin tendered him a public supper and ball, as an unostentatious display of genuine feeling and respect for a distinguished public servant. But a still more gratifying evidence of the public estimation was the confidence inspired on that whole frontier, that his presence in command there was a sufficient guarantee of its safety. On May 19th he was ordered to Louisville, Kentucky; and, by telegram, on June 29th, to report at Washington City. When General Johnston was ordered on, it was not e
Guadalupe (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
. The following instance is given as an illustration of General Johnston's mode of dealing with the people of the frontier. The citizens of Hays and Comal Counties joined in a petition to General Johnston, requesting him to station a force to protect their settlements. To their spokesman, Judge William E. Jones, General Johnston sent the following reply: San Antonio, Texas, December 1, 1S56. dear sir: Your letter in relation to the exposed condition of the settlements between the Guadalupe and Pedernalis Rivers, embracing those of the Blanco, has been received. Captain Bradfute, Second Cavalry, with the effective strength of his company, has been ordered to encamp at some suitable position between five and ten miles to the northward of Sisterdale, to keep the country up the Guadalupe, on the Pedernalis, and intermediate, constantly under observation by means of scouting parties, and also to examine the country in the direction of the Blanco. While all that activity a
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