hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
A. S. Johnston 1,542 0 Browse Search
Albert Sidney Johnston 865 67 Browse Search
Texas (Texas, United States) 578 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 515 3 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 458 0 Browse Search
William Preston Johnston 445 3 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 436 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 404 0 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 347 1 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 341 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

Found 555 total hits in 111 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Fort Grant (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
ingers preceding still the fates, And prologue to the omen coming on, Have heaven and earth together demonstrated, Unto our climatures and countrymen. Hamlet, Act I, Scene 1. Its appearance was so sudden that I am sure that there was not a man in the party upon whom it did not make an impression. Captain Gift says: At Blue Water we were met by two citizens of Tucson, who came to apprise us of the fact that the Federal forces were evacuating the Territory, and had already burned Fort Breckinridge, and, in passing through Tucson toward Fort Buchanan, had burned the town grist-mill, the only one upon which the people had to depend for their flour. Therefore, much indignation existed, and there was a general wish to join forces with us and punish the vandals. The Federal troops amounted to four companies-two infantry and two dragoon-and with our force of thirty men, the people could combine an equal number, and, by pouncing suddenly on the enemy, it was thought an easy victory c
Picacho (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
ve generals, but I knew I had one, and that was Sidney Johnston. Itinerary. 1861. June 16.Left Los Angeles — to Rancho Chino, thirty-five miles. June 22.Arrived at Warner's Ranch. One hundred miles from Los Angeles. June 27.Left Warner's. To Vallecito. June 30.Left Vallecito. Sunday night. Eighteen miles to Carrizo Wells. Comet seen. July 1.Left Carrizo, 3 P. M. Thirty-seven miles to Indian Wells. July 2.Indian Wells at noon. Twenty-eight miles to Alamo Springs. July 3.Alamo Springs at 8 A. M. Thirty miles to Cook's Wells. July 4.Cook's to Yeager's Ferry. (Fort Yuma.) July 7.Yuma, up the Gila, and thence two hundred and seventy miles to Tucson. July 18.Arrived at Tucson. July 22.Left Tucson, 8 A. M. Thirty miles. July 23.Forty miles to a dry camp. July 24.Fifteen miles to Dragoon Springs, thence fifty miles to Apache Pass. July 25. July 26. July 27.From Apache Pass. One hundred and sixty-five miles to the Rio Grande at Picacho, near Mesilla. July 28.To Mesill
San Francisco (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
like fate, he said to his wife; twice Texas makes me a rebel. While General Johnston was at Los Angeles a beautiful set of silver was sent to him, on the salver of which was this inscription, To General A. Sidney Johnston, from friends in San Francisco. Coming at such a time, this mark of approbation from valued friends was doubly prized. While in service, he had scrupulously regarded the obligation laid upon public officers alike by a jealous self-respect and by the Mosaic injunction: Th now known as Colonel Ridley. and the writer had determined to go South, and waited a favorable opportunity. Ridley favored the journey across the Plains, and I favored the route by sea, being a seaman. On the arrival of the general from San Francisco, we had an interview, and it was determined to try to raise a party sufficiently strong to cross the Plains without fear of molestation from the Indians, then very hostile and enterprising. It was concluded that the party should consist of a
Las Cruces (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
silla, where was situated the little Mexican village of Picacho, inhabited by poor farmers, whose cornfields lay about the town. Eight miles below Mesilla was Fort Fillmore, with a strong Federal garrison, and it was probable that they would find the road picketed, and troops in the village. There was good ground for apprehensionolonel John R. Baylor. These troops, consisting of eight companies of the Seventh Infantry and three companies of the Rifle regiment, had been concentrated at Fort Fillmore, eight miles below this place, with the view of transferring them to the States after the arrival of four companies from Fort Buchanan, viz., two of the Seventwe preceded on the road. The audacity of the Mesilla people in keeping up a secession flag had excited the ire of the commander of the United States forces at Fort Fillmore, Major Lynde, and, after frequent threats, he resolved to chastise them. The Texan commander, hearing of the condition of affairs at Mesilla, came up, and occ
San Diego County (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
e of California breed, and a small, black, Mexican pack-mule, a hardy, untamable beast. The general carried all his provisions, camp-equipage, etc., in the ambulance, and, in crossing the desert, a good quantity of barley for forage. The mule was also packed with barley. As previously mentioned, it was given out that our starting-day had been postponed to the 25th. The general being all ready on the 16th, he started to the place of rendezvous, Warner's Ranch, or Agua Caliente, in San Diego County, which was more than a hundred miles on the road. He left Los Angeles at daybreak with Captain Ridley and his servant Ran, and went to the Chino Ranch, thirty miles from Los Angeles, whence he was accompanied by Dr. Carman Frazee. Dr. Frazee knew the country well, and acted as guide. Frazee served as private in Colonel Jefferson Davis's First Mississippi Regiment in the Mexican War. They rested at Chino during part of the day, and then moved forward, Mr. Carlisle, the proprietor of
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): chapter 19
outfit consisted of a strong, light, covered ambulance, drawn by two good American mules (American as distinguished from Mexican), a saddle-horse of California breed, and a small, black, Mexican pack-mule, a hardy, untamable beast. The general carrMexican pack-mule, a hardy, untamable beast. The general carried all his provisions, camp-equipage, etc., in the ambulance, and, in crossing the desert, a good quantity of barley for forage. The mule was also packed with barley. As previously mentioned, it was given out that our starting-day had been posand warn the general should soldiers appear in his rear. In this event, he and Frazee would have made their way to Mexican territory on horseback. The Federals, however, had no knowledge of the general's departure, and did not follow him. About ths made without camping. The road led to the river at a point several miles above Mesilla, where was situated the little Mexican village of Picacho, inhabited by poor farmers, whose cornfields lay about the town. Eight miles below Mesilla was Fort
El Paso, Woodford County, Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
le party, so they pushed on. That their precautions were well-judged is manifest from the following letter, written from El Paso some weeks later: My dear General: Colonel Canby sent an order to Fort Buchanan to have you intercepted and made priow we will resume our journey. Great events are transpiring, and we feel called on to hurry on. I may take the stage at El Paso, though I dread stages overland, especially as they are always crowded. Tell Dr. John that his friend Captain Potter wathemselves of it at once. The general, after nearly two weeks unavoidable delay, proceeded by the same conveyance, from El Paso. He did this very reluctantly, and would have remained with us, until the last of the party could start for San Antonio. Among the little incidents retained in the memory of his companions on this journey, Ridley relates this: At El Paso, a small party were collected, among whom were the general and Major Armistead. The usual topic was being discussed — t
Mesilla (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
r camp under any pretext. Between Tucson and Mesilla we saw the wrecks of two stages which had beed to the river at a point several miles above Mesilla, where was situated the little Mexican villagfields lay about the town. Eight miles below Mesilla was Fort Fillmore, with a strong Federal garr command by the Texans under Colonel Baylor: Mesilla, Arizona, August 7, 1861. My dear wife: Weander, hearing of the condition of affairs at Mesilla, came up, and occupied the place with about 2als Give my love to our dear children. At Mesilla, the party disbanded, most of them taking thes. Ridley says: There was a stage from Mesilla to San Antonio, and some of our party availed lodging. The journey from Los Angeles to Mesilla was 800 miles, and thence to San Antonio, theOne hundred and sixty-five miles to the Rio Grande at Picacho, near Mesilla. July 28.To Mesilla. One hundred and sixty-five miles to the Rio Grande at Picacho, near Mesilla. July 28.To Mesilla.
Apache (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
uld be obtained. Many of our party were eager to burn powder, and try their mettle; but the general restrained them with the same argument he had used at Yuma-we must commit no illegal act. We rested by the pure waters, and grazed our animals on the pastures near Tucson, for two days. The country through which they passed was uninhabited, except at rare intervals. There were a few villages of Pimos Indians, a peaceable agricultural tribe; but the country was infested by roving bands of Apache and Navajo Indians, tribes very similar to the Comanches, heretofore described in this volume. Timber was scarce; and, on every hand, the distant landscape was broken by rugged ranges, or bald, isolated mountains. Sometimes the road passed through a region of thorns and cacti, of all forms and sizes, prickly and threatening, that pressed their spines against the unwary traveler. Then the road would ascend from these depressed valleys to high, rocky table-lands, threading the most accessib
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
remark the patience and endurance of our general, who at all times bore himself with cheerfulness and dignity, and set us an example of fortitude and self-denial. After our seventy miles' ride without water, when we reached the wells entirely spent and dry, we found them foul and noxious with dead rats. We set to work to draw out and clean them; and, after we had finished, the first cup was handed to the general. He drank, and remarked, This water tastes like the White Sulphur Springs in Virginia. After that, no man could decline to taste of the waters, and we gladly cooled our parched throats. On a certain night, wet and stormy, as I sat by the camp-fire of the general, I expressed my dread of water, having nothing but blankets to sleep upon. Whereupon a most cordial invitation was given me to share his water-proof rubbers, which afforded us a most comfortable night's lodging. The journey from Los Angeles to Mesilla was 800 miles, and thence to San Antonio, the frontier
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...