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South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
this duty had not been previously performed, the commanders of divisions and brigades were assembled that night, the order was read to them, and the topography of the enemy's position was explained as far as understood by us, which was imperfectly enough. They knew that in the recesses of that forest, between those creeks, 50,000 invaders were posted; but where, or how, and with what preparation, no man could tell. Many of these soldiers, familiar with the dangerous sports of their native South, must have felt as when hunting in the dense canebrake, and, following the trail, they drew near the den of some great bear, hidden in the thicket, with whom momently they expected encounter and mortal struggle. The order was to march at three o'clock in the morning, so as to attack the enemy early on the 5th. So far as human knowledge can reach, if this order could have been carried out, Grant and his army would have been destroyed. But man proposes, and God disposes. The same elemen
Corinth (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
s advice to the men was brief and characteristic. He told them, Look along your guns, and fire low. During the intervals of the march on the 4th and 5th of April, while the men stood on their arms, the following address of the commanding general was read at the head of each regiment. It was received with exhibitions of deep feeling, and the soldiers were stirred to a still sterner resolution, which proved itself in the succeeding conflict. headquarters, army of the Mississippi, Corinth, Mississippi, April 8, 1862. soldiers of the army of the Mississippi: I have put you in motion to offer battle to the invaders of your country. With the resolution and discipline and valor becoming men fighting, as you are, for all worth living or dying for, you can but march to a decisive victory over the agrarian mercenaries sent to subjugate you and to despoil you of your liberties, your property, and your honor. Remember the precious stake involved; remember the dependence of your mothers
Moulton (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
p. 244): Probably no single battle of the war gave rise to such wild and damaging reports. It was publicly asserted at the North that our army was taken completely by surprise, etc. His denial is not categorical, but by inference; but Moulton's Criticism of Boynton's review of Sherman (page 11), which is virtually General Sherman's own utterance, denies any purpose or necessity of contradicting the foolish stories about our forces being surprised by the enemy at its beginning. Moulteneral Johnston marched from Corinth with an unalterable resolution to attack, which nothing, not even the remonstrances of his second in command, could shake, and intended to attack on the morning of the 5th. It is not necessary to consider Moulton's statements seriatim; for, though all of them have some color of fact, they are not relevant to the issue. A narrative of the facts will leave a clearer impression on the reader's mind than any word-mongering or technical disputations. Wheth
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
r Hardee's command for the battle. Hardee's three brigades numbered 6,789 effectives, and Gladden added 2,235 more — an effective total in the front line of 9,024. Bragg commanded the second line. Withers's division formed his right wing. Jackson's brigade, 2,208 strong, was drawn up three hundred yards in rear of Gladden, its left on the Bark road. Chalmers's brigade was on Jackson's right, en echelon to Gladden's brigade, with its right on a fork of Lick Creek. Clanton's cavalry was Jackson's right, en echelon to Gladden's brigade, with its right on a fork of Lick Creek. Clanton's cavalry was in rear of Chalmers's, with pickets to the right and front. In this order the division bivouacked. General Bragg's left wing was made up of three brigades, under General D. Ruggles. Colonel R. L. Gibson commanded the right brigade, resting with his right on the Bark road. Colonel Preston Pond commanded the left brigade, near Owl Creek, with an interval between him and Gibson. About three hundred yards in the rear of these two brigades, opposite the interval, with his right and left flank
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
n miles, by that route, from Corinth, and four or five miles from Pittsburg. The Second Corps, under Bragg, marched by the direct road to Pittsburg, through Monterey. This road proved so narrow and bad that the head of Bragg's column did not reach Monterey until 11 A. M. on th General Grant kept his headquarters at Savannah, nine miles from Pittsburg by water and six or seven by land, and left a large discretion intch to Grant, sent with the above to Halleck, is as follows: Pittsburg Landing, April 5, 1862. sir: All is quiet along my lines now. We aittle wooden meeting-house, two miles and a half or more from Pittsburg Landing, on the Corinth road. The road to Purdy crosses the Corinth the front line, and about three-quarters of a mile in advance of Pittsburg, were encamped to the left, Hurlbut's (the Fourth), and to the riugh Savannah on Saturday morning, April 5th, and was distant from Pittsburg about five miles on the north bank of the river. Crittenden's di
Lick Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
le, about a mile and a half west of Shiloh church, where Lick Creek and Owl Creek approach most nearly, a space of about thr occupy his right. This line extended from Owl Creek to Lick Creek. General Johnston had reached Bragg's headquarters earlyk you of your chances for success? He replied: There is Lick Creek on my right, and Owl Creek on my left. These creeks effrigade, was under Hardee, and extended from Owl Creek to Lick Creek, a distance of somewhat over three miles. Cleburne's briese occupied the centre. The interval, on his right, to Lick Creek, was occupied by Gladden's brigade, detached from Bragg,chelon to Gladden's brigade, with its right on a fork of Lick Creek. Clanton's cavalry was in rear of Chalmers's, with pick in position on the extreme left, guarding the ford over Lick Creek. Each brigade had three regiments and a battery; and erdy road crossed Owl Creek to the ford near the mouth of Lick Creek, which was guarded by Stuart's brigade. General Lew Wal
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
dded the confusion arising from any change of orders with raw troops as to routes in the labyrinth of roads in that vicinity. Hardee's corps, moving on the Ridge road under its methodical commander, assisted by the ardor and energy of Hindman and Cleburne, moved with greater celerity than the other troops. But something of this was due to their apprenticeship in war, under General Johnston's own eye and inspiration, on outpost duty in Kentucky and in the long and toilsome march from Bowling Green to Corinth, which had inured them to the hardships and difficulties of this kind of service. Polk's corps was at this time superior to the others in its transportation and in its experience under fire, and Bragg's in drill and order. Each had its own excellence; but all were soon to be welded to a common temper in the white heat of sectional-war. But at this time the whole army was new, and not yet moulded into a consistent whole. In describing his own corps, Bragg correctly portr
Adamsville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
rters of a mile in advance of Pittsburg, were encamped to the left, Hurlbut's (the Fourth), and to the right, Smith's (the Second) division, the latter under General W. H. L. Wallace. The Federal front was an arc or very obtuse angle extending from where the Purdy road crossed Owl Creek to the ford near the mouth of Lick Creek, which was guarded by Stuart's brigade. General Lew Wallace's division was five or six miles distant, with one brigade at Crump's Landing, and the other two on the Adamsville road, with intervals of some two miles, in observation of Cheatham's division, which he believed to be still at Purdy. The advance of Buell's army, Nelson's division, had passed through Savannah on Saturday morning, April 5th, and was distant from Pittsburg about five miles on the north bank of the river. Crittenden's division arrived there on the morning of the 6th, and the other divisions of Buell's army followed at intervals of about six miles. The arrangement of Grant's army at S
Worthington (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
asis General Prentiss acted in throwing to the front ten companies, under Colonel Moore, to watch the approaches to his position. But it is perfectly evident that Grant and Sherman considered themselves above such idle fears. The vulgar apprehension did not touch the victor of Donelson. It never reached either Grant or Sherman. Indeed, the latter, with bitter innuendo, points to it as proof of cowardice in certain officers with whom he was at variance. He swears in his evidence on Worthington's trial. Sherman's historical raid, by Boynton, p. 29. Therefore, on Friday, two days before the battle, when Colonel Worthington was so apprehensive, I knew there was no hostile party in six miles, Hardee was not more than two miles distant. though there was reason to expect an attack. I suppose Colonel McDowell and myself had become tired of his constant prognostications, and paid no attention to him, especially when we were positively informed by men like Buckland, Kilby Smi
Shiloh Church (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
Confederate advance immediately deployed in line of battle, about a mile and a half west of Shiloh church, where Lick Creek and Owl Creek approach most nearly, a space of about three miles. Hardee's afternoon late, when the Confederate army was drawn up in battle array, within two miles of Shiloh Church, General Beauregard earnestly urged the necessity of a retreat. General Johnston, against har as he thinks, as four or five miles, the distance named by him, did not intervene between Shiloh Church and Mickey's, in front of which Hardee's corps was deploying. Indeed, Colonel Buckland, whoSherman commanded the advance, consisting of the Fifth Division, and had his headquarters at Shiloh Church, a little wooden meeting-house, two miles and a half or more from Pittsburg Landing, on the the broken surface of the Shiloh plateau, one principal road diverged to the left in rear of Shiloh Church from the direct Pittsburg and Corinth road, and following the ridge led into both the Bark r
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