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Browsing named entities in a specific section of John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War.. Search the whole document.

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Jennings Wise: Captain of the Blues I. I found in an old portfolio, the other day, the following slip from a Norfolk paper of the year 1862: The Confederate steamer Arrow arrived here this morning, from Currituck, having communicated with a steamer sent down to Roanoke Island under a flag of truce. She brought up the bodies of Captain O. J. Wise, Lieutenant William Selden, and Captain Coles. Captain Wise was pierced by three balls, and Lieutenant Selden was shot through the head. The Yankees who saw Captain Wise during the fierce and unequal contest, declare that he displayed a gallantry and valour never surpassed. Alas, that he has fallen in a contest so unequal! But who has fallen more honourably, more nobly? Young Selden, too, died at his gun, while gallantly fighting the enemy that had gathered in so superior numbers upon our shores. Last night, when the steamer arrived at Currituck, General Wise directed that the coffin containing the remains of his son b
William Selden (search for this): chapter 1.13
, from Currituck, having communicated with a steamer sent down to Roanoke Island under a flag of truce. She brought up the bodies of Captain O. J. Wise, Lieutenant William Selden, and Captain Coles. Captain Wise was pierced by three balls, and Lieutenant Selden was shot through the head. The Yankees who saw Captain Wise during thLieutenant Selden was shot through the head. The Yankees who saw Captain Wise during the fierce and unequal contest, declare that he displayed a gallantry and valour never surpassed. Alas, that he has fallen in a contest so unequal! But who has fallen more honourably, more nobly? Young Selden, too, died at his gun, while gallantly fighting the enemy that had gathered in so superior numbers upon our shores. LasSelden, too, died at his gun, while gallantly fighting the enemy that had gathered in so superior numbers upon our shores. Last night, when the steamer arrived at Currituck, General Wise directed that the coffin containing the remains of his son be opened. Then, I learn from those who were present, a scene transpired that words cannot describe. The old hero bent over the body of his son, on whose pale face the full moon threw its light, kissed the cold
hearthad been branded as the enemy of his species — as a haughty, soulless, pitiless monster! In speaking of this young Virginian, I wish to espouse no personal or party quarrel — to arouse none of those enmities which sleep now — to open no old wounds, and to fan into flame none of the heart-burnings of the past. Those who contended with him most bitterly have long ago forgotten their feud. Many shed tears for the noble youth when he fell, and speak of him now as one of those great Virginians whom it is the pride of our soil to have produced. They know him better now, and understand that this man was no hater of his species — no Ishmael of civilization, cold and haughty and implacable-but a beautiful and noble nature, attuned to every honourable impulse, and only embittered temporarily by party passion. Dying, he has suffered change; and there is a beauty in the pale, cold face, which it never possessed while living. Traits never suspected come out now, when Death has stam
east all opposition with a stubborn, dauntless front, was to act as his character dictated, and to follow his temperament. The sentiment of fear, I believe, never entered his breast; if it did, it never stayed there long enough for him to make its acquaintance. He would have led the charge of the English cavalry at Balaklava with the nerve and dash of Hotspur, glorying in the roar of the enemy's artillery, and resolute to take their guns or die. At Thermopylae, he would have stood beside Leonidas, and fought and died without the shudder of a nerve. In battle at the head of his men, his coolness and resolution were invincible. The grim front of war possessed no terrors for him, and he advanced into the gulf of battle with the calmness of a holiday soldier on parade. 2. He was early in the lists as the advocate of resistance to the North, and fought its opponents with persistent vehemence. To wait was to sign the death-warrant of the State, he declared. God save the libertie
lunteer company in Virginia-took the leadership from the first, as one born to command, and fought and fell at that bloody Roanoke fight, at the head of his company, and cheering on his men. His body was brought back to Richmond, laid in the capitol, and buried, in presence of a great concourse of mourners, in Hollywood Cemetery. That was the end of the brief young life-death in defence of his native land, and a grave in the beloved soil, by the side of the great river, and the ashes of Monroe, brought thither by himself and his associates. Then came a revulsion. His character was better understood; his faults were forgotten; his virtues recognised. Even his old opponents hastened to express their sympathy and admiration. It was remembered that more than once he had refused to return his adversary's fire; that championship of one whom he loved more than life had inflamed his enmity — no merely selfish considerations. His sweetness of temper and kindness were recalled by ma
Jennings Wise (search for this): chapter 1.13
Jennings Wise: Captain of the Blues I. I found in an old portfolio, the other day, the following slip from a Norfolk paper of the year 1862: The Confederate steamer Arrow arrived here this morning, from Currituck, having communicatedoving friends who knew and appreciated him. And though I shall not attempt anything in the shape of a memoir of young Jennings Wise, my few words may not prove uninteresting to those who watched, from a distance, his meteoric career, and perhaps admired his brave spirit, while ignorance of his real character led them to misunderstand him. Jennings Wise! How many memories that name recalls!--memories of gentleness and chivalry, and lofty honour, to those who knew him truly — of fancied ur dead heroes who surrendered youth, and coming fame, and friends, and home, and life for their native land-surrendered them without a murmur or a single regret-among these great souls the Genius of History must inscribe the name of Jennings Wise
Jennings Wise: Captain of the Blues I. I found in an old portfolio, the other day, the following slip from a Norfolk paper of the year 1862: The Confederate steamer Arrow arrived here this morning, from Currituck, having communicated with a steamer sent down to Roanoke Island under a flag of truce. She brought up the bodies of Captain O. J. Wise, Lieutenant William Selden, and Captain Coles. Captain Wise was pierced by three balls, and Lieutenant Selden was shot through the head. The Yankees who saw Captain Wise during the fierce and unequal contest, declare that he displayed a gallantry and valour never surpassed. Alas, that he has fallen in a contest so unequal! But who has fallen more honourably, more nobly? Young Selden, too, died at his gun, while gallantly fighting the enemy that had gathered in so superior numbers upon our shores. Last night, when the steamer arrived at Currituck, General Wise directed that the coffin containing the remains of his son be
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