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Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
red miles of coast! And so inefficient was the early blockade of Charleston, Wilmington and New Orleans, that traders ran in and out, actually with greater frequencytion! But who recalls the arrival of a blockader at Charleston, Savannah, or Wilmington, when its ventures were not exposed at the auctions of Richmond, in time unre, of the southern cause. The once fair cities of Charleston, Savannah and Wilmington suffered most from the blockade, both in destruction of property and demoraliowy little blockader into port. And with what result has just been seen! Wilmington — from long and shoal approach to her proper portwas more difficult still to t, Wilkinson and their confreres, household words among the rough sea-dogs of Wilmington. Savannah suffered least of the fair Atlantic sisterhood, from the blockaety for that growth of luxury and riotous living, which at one time possessed Wilmington. Into that blockade mart would enter four ships to one at any other port;
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
t Wilmington demoralization and disgust the Mississippi closed Vicksburg running the Bloc. on the border the spy system female agentsage of communication with the trans-Mississippi by the capture of Vicksburg. The Heroic City had long been sole point of contact with theuction, they withdrew on June 24th; leaving her banners inscribed-Vicksburg vicrix! In May of the next year, another concentration was maarmy one hundred and fifty miles from its base, to get in rear of Vicksburg and cut off its relief. The very audacity of this plan may blindavis promoted Pemberton to a lieutenant-generalcy and sent him to Vicksburg. But this is no place to discuss General Pemberton's abilities-he disasters of Baker's creek and Big Black; or his shutting up in Vicksburg, hopeless of relief from Johnston. Suffice it, the dismal echo of falling Vicksburg supplemented the gloom after Gettysburg; and the swift-following loss of Port Hudson completed the blockade of the Missis
Keokuk, Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
he tedious and persistent bombardment-perhaps unexampled in the history of gunnery; surely so in devices to injure non-combatant inhabitants. On the 30th January, 1863, the two slow, clumsy and badly-built rams, under Captain Ingraham--of Martin Koszta fame-attacked the blockading squadron and drove the Union flag completely from the harbor; but re-enforced by iron-clads, it returned on the 7th of April. Again, after a fierce battle with the fort, the Federal fleet drew off, leaving the Keokuk monitor sunk; only to concentrate troops and build heavy batteries, for persistent attempt to reduce the devoted city. The history of that stubborn siege and defense, more stubborn still; of the woman-shelling swamp-angel and the Greek-fire; of the deeds of prowess that gleamed from the crumbling walls of Charleston-all this is too familiar for repetition. Yet, ever and again-through wooden mesh of the blockade-net and its iron links, alike-slipped a fleet, arrowy little blockader into por
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
the Optimist view production and speculation blockade companies sumptuary laws growth of evil power Charleston and Savannah running the fleet at Wilmington demoralization and disgust the Mississippi closed Vicksburg running the Bloc. on another, while the army starved because of no transportation! But who recalls the arrival of a blockader at Charleston, Savannah, or Wilmington, when its ventures were not exposed at the auctions of Richmond, in time unreasonably short! These faockade mismanagement was twin-destroyer with the finance, of the southern cause. The once fair cities of Charleston, Savannah and Wilmington suffered most from the blockade, both in destruction of property and demoralization of their populations.hat made the names of Maffit, Wilkinson and their confreres, household words among the rough sea-dogs of Wilmington. Savannah suffered least of the fair Atlantic sisterhood, from the blockade. The early capture of her .river forts blocked access
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
fe. When the three first commissioners to Europe-Messrs. Yancey, Rost and Mann-sailed from New Orleans, on March 31, 1861, their mission was hailed as harbinger to speedy fruition of these delusive thoughts, to which the wish alone was father. Then-though very gradually-began belief that they had reckoned too fast; and doubt began to chill glowing hopes of immediate recognition from Europe. But there was none, as yet, relative to her ultimate action. The successful trial trip of the Nashville, Captain Pegram, C. S. N.-and her warm reception by the British press and peoplepre-vented that. And, after every victory of the South, her newspapers were filled with praise from the press of England. But graduallyas recognition did not come-first wonder, then doubt, and finally despair took the place of certainty. When Mr. Yancey came back, in disgust, and made his plain statement of the true state of foreign sentiment, he carried public opinion to his side; and-while the Governmen
Strasbourg (France) (search for this): chapter 32
blood; came to regard the very name of blockade-runner as a stench and the government that leagued with it as a reproach? For strangely-colored exaggerations of luxury and license were brought away by visitors near the centers of the only commerce left. Well might the soul of the soldier-frying his scant ration of moldy bacon and grieving over still more scant supply at his distant home-wax wroth over stories of Southdown mutton, brought in ice from England; of dinners where the pates of Strasbourg and the fruits of the East were washed down with rare Champagne. Bitter, indeed, it seemed, that-while he crawled, footsore and faint, to slake his thirst from the roadside pool-while the dear ones at home kept in shivering life with cornbread-degenerate southerners and foreign leeches reveled in luxury untold, from the very gain that caused such privation! This misuse of that blockade-running — which strongly handled had proved such potent agency for good-bred infinite discontent
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
n hiding. But its most singular and most romantic aspect was the well-known fact, that many women essayed the breaking of the border blockade. Almost all of them were successful; more than one well nigh invaluable, for the information she brought, sewed in her riding-habit, or coiled in her hair. Nor were these coarse camp-women, or reckless adventurers. Belle Boyd's name became historic as Moll Pitcher; but others are recalled --petted belles in the society of Baltimore, Washington and Virginia summer resorts of yore — who rode through night and peril alike, to carry tidings of cheer home and bring back news that woman may best acquire. New York, Baltimore and Washington to-day boast of three beautiful and gifted women, high in their social ranks, who could — if they would-recite tales of lonely race and perilous adventure, to raise the hair of the budding beaux about them. But it may be that the real benefits of running the bloc. were counterbalanced by inseparable evils.
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
to reap part of the bad fruits with which they were so overstocked. These proud southern cities had ever been famed throughout the land, for purity, high tone and unyielding pride. At the first bugleblast, their men had sprung to arms with one accord; and the best blood of Georgia and the Carolinas was poured out from Munson's Hill to Chickamauga. Their devoted women pinched themselves and stripped their homes, to aid the cause so sacred to them; and on the burning sand-hills of Charleston harbor, grandsire and grandson wrought side by side under blistering sun and galling fire alike! How bitter, then, for those devoted and mourning cities to see their sacred places made mere marts; their cherished fame jeopardied by refuse stay-at-homes, or transient aliens; while vile speculation-ineffably greedy, when not boldly dishonest-smirched them with lowest vices of the lust for gain! Shot-riddled Charlestonex-posed and devastated-invited nothing beyond the sterner business of mo
Wilmington River (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
e-Wall blockade, abroad and at home. Foundation errors lost opportunity the Treaty of Paris view first southern commissioners doubts the Mason Slidell incident Mr. Benjamin's foreign policy Deleon's captured despatches murmurs loud and deep England's attitude other great Powers Mr. Davis' view if interest of the Powers the Optimist view production and speculation blockade companies sumptuary laws growth of evil power Charleston and Savannah running the fleet at Wilmington demoralization and disgust the Mississippi closed Vicksburg running the Bloc. on the border the spy system female agents. Potent factor in sapping the foundations of Confederate hope and of Confederate credit, was the blockade. First held in contempt; later fruitful mother of errors, as to the movements and intentions of European powers; ever the growing constrictor-whose coil was slowly, but surely, to crush out life-it became each year harder to bear :--at last unbearable!
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 32
ng been attempted. Fleets of gunboats ploughed the Potomac and all inland water-approaches to the southern frontier. A shrewd detective system, ramifying from Washington, penetrated the disaffected counties of Maryland; spying equally upon shore and household. The borders of Tennessee and Kentucky were closely picketed; and no se camp-women, or reckless adventurers. Belle Boyd's name became historic as Moll Pitcher; but others are recalled --petted belles in the society of Baltimore, Washington and Virginia summer resorts of yore — who rode through night and peril alike, to carry tidings of cheer home and bring back news that woman may best acquire. New York, Baltimore and Washington to-day boast of three beautiful and gifted women, high in their social ranks, who could — if they would-recite tales of lonely race and perilous adventure, to raise the hair of the budding beaux about them. But it may be that the real benefits of running the bloc. were counterbalanced by inse
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