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Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 4
rigade of two regiments had arrived from Aquia Creek, and Johnston's troops were arriving by the railroad, after much delay ttached to my brigade on this day. The arrival of General Johnston in person and the transportation of his troops on thehe right, to conduct an attack on the enemy, but that General Johnston was on that part of the field near which we were and instructions. He pointed out the direction in which General Johnston was, and I moved on, soon meeting the General himselfe rear the day appeared to be going against us. While General Johnston was speaking to me, quite a squad of men approached ueived. I requested him to inform Generals Beauregard and Johnston of my position and ask them to send me orders. While we ff officers in search of either General Beauregard or General Johnston, in order to give information of my position and get ntil I met an officer who said he was on the staff of General Johnston and was looking for him. He stated that he was just f
ce of Lieutenant McDonald, however, caused me to halt my troops and ride to the crest of the ridge, where I observed a regiment about two hundred yards to my right drawn up in line in front of the woods where Elzey's left was. The dress of the volunteers on both sides at that time was very similar, and the flag of the regiment I saw was drooping around the staff, so that I could not see whether it was the United States or the Confederate flag. The very confident manner of Lieutenant Mc- Donald, in his statement in regard to the troops in my front, induced me to believe that this must also be one of our regiments. Colonel Stuart had also advanced on my left with his two companies of cavalry and Beckham's battery of four guns, and passed around Chinn's house, the battery had been brought into action and opened a flank fire on the regiment I was observing. Thinking it certainly was one of ours, I started a messenger to Colonel Stuart, to give him the information and request him
Strasburg Kershaw (search for this): chapter 4
While we were conversing we observed a body of troops across Bull Run, some distance below, moving in good order in the direction of Centreville. I at first supposed it to be Bonham's brigade moving from Mitchell's Ford, but it turned out to be Kershaw's and Cash's regiments of that brigade, which had preceded me to the battlefield and were now moving in pursuit, after having crossed at or below Stone Bridge. Bonham's position at Mitchell's Ford was entirely too far off for his movement to, bge and trains. Early in the morning a Virginia company under Captain Gibson, unattached, had been permitted, at the request of the Captain, to join Kemper's regiment and remained with it throughout the day. A South Carolina company belonging to Kershaw's or Cash's regiment, which was oA picket at the time their regiments moved from Mitchell's Ford, not being able to find its proper command, had joined me just as we were advancing against the enemy near Chinn's house, and had been attached to H
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 4
messenger came to me from Colonel, afterwards General, J. E. B. Stuart, who was on our extreme left with two companies of cav a field immediately on the left of the woods, and between Stuart's position and the left of our infantry then engaged. The messenger from Colonel Stuart soon returned in a gallop and stated that the Colonel said the enemy had only retired his lieve that this must also be one of our regiments. Colonel Stuart had also advanced on my left with his two companies ofit certainly was one of ours, I started a messenger to Colonel Stuart, to give him the information and request him to stop tre the two companies of cavalry and Beckham's battery with Stuart. On my immediate right and a little to the rear was Elzeyring on the retreating enemy until beyond their range, and Stuart soon went in pursuit followed by Beckham. Colonel Cocke nd taken. Moreover the country was entirely unknown to me. Stuart and Beckham had crossed the run above me, and Cocke's regi
ositive assurance of Lieutenant McDonald, however, caused me to halt my troops and ride to the crest of the ridge, where I observed a regiment about two hundred yards to my right drawn up in line in front of the woods where Elzey's left was. The dress of the volunteers on both sides at that time was very similar, and the flag of the regiment I saw was drooping around the staff, so that I could not see whether it was the United States or the Confederate flag. The very confident manner of Lieutenant Mc- Donald, in his statement in regard to the troops in my front, induced me to believe that this must also be one of our regiments. Colonel Stuart had also advanced on my left with his two companies of cavalry and Beckham's battery of four guns, and passed around Chinn's house, the battery had been brought into action and opened a flank fire on the regiment I was observing. Thinking it certainly was one of ours, I started a messenger to Colonel Stuart, to give him the information
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 4
o found Lieutenant Colonel Gardner of the 8th Georgia Regiment in the yard of the Carter house, where he had been brought by some of the enemy engaged in collecting the wounded, and suffering from a very painful wound. Shortly after this President Davis, accompanied by several gentlemen, rode to where my command was. He addressed a few remarks to each regiment and was received with great enthusiasm. I then informed him of the condition of things as far as I knew them, told him of the condihat brigade, which had preceded me to the battlefield and were now moving in pursuit, after having crossed at or below Stone Bridge. Bonham's position at Mitchell's Ford was entirely too far off for his movement to, be observed. As soon as Mr. Davis left me, I moved my command farther into the bend of Bull Run, and put it in line across the bend with the flanks resting on the stream, the right flank being some distance above Stone Bridge. In this position my troops spent the night. They
D. H. Hill (search for this): chapter 4
eir two regiments started up the side of the hill. As we advanced the enemy disappeared behind the crest, and while we were ascending the slope Lieutenant McDonald, acting aide to Colonel Elzey, came riding rapidly towards me and requested me not to let my men fire on the troops in my front, stating that they consisted of the 13th Virginia Regiment of Elzey's brigade. I said to him,--They have been firing on my men, to which he replied, I know they have, but it is a mistake, I recognize Colonel Hill of the 13th, and his horse. This was a mistake on the part of Lieutenant McDonald, arising from a fancied resemblance of a mounted officer with the enemy to the Colonel of the 13th. This regiment did not reach the battlefield at all. This information and the positive assurance of Lieutenant McDonald, however, caused me to halt my troops and ride to the crest of the ridge, where I observed a regiment about two hundred yards to my right drawn up in line in front of the woods where Elz
John S. Preston (search for this): chapter 4
he declared that he would go back and give them another trial. He fell into the ranks of Kemper's regiment and I believe remained with it to the close of the battle. Captain Gardner had been sent ahead for instructions and had met with Colonel John S. Preston, a volunteer aide to General Beauregard; and on our getting near to the battlefield, Colonel Preston rode to meet us and informed me that the General had gone to the front on the right, to conduct an attack on the enemy, but that GeneralColonel Preston rode to meet us and informed me that the General had gone to the front on the right, to conduct an attack on the enemy, but that General Johnston was on that part of the field near which we were and would give me instructions. He pointed out the direction in which General Johnston was, and I moved on, soon meeting the General himself, who rode towards us when he discovered our approach, and expressed his gratification at our arrival. I asked him at once to show me my position, to which he replied that he was too much engaged to do that in person, but would give me directions as to what I was to do. He then directed me to m
Fleming Gardner (search for this): chapter 4
urn of the companies of the 24th, and directed my Acting Adjutant General, Captain Gardner, to ride to Mitchell's Ford and ascertain where General Beauregard was, asent commenced about or very shortly after 1 o'clock P. M. On the way I met Captain Gardner returning with the information that General Beauregard's headquarters woulper's regiment and I believe remained with it to the close of the battle. Captain Gardner had been sent ahead for instructions and had met with Colonel John S. Pres in to Matthews' house near where the battle had begun. I also found Lieutenant Colonel Gardner of the 8th Georgia Regiment in the yard of the Carter house, where heof things as far as I knew them, told him of the condition and location of Colonel Gardner, and requested him to have medical assistance sent to him, as no medical oursuit next morning. Very early on the morning of the 22nd, I sent Captain Fleming Gardner to Manassas for instruction, and he returned with directions to me fro
well at Union Mills; D. R. Jones at McLean's Ford; Longstreet, reinforced by the 5th North Carolina, at Blackburn's Ford; Bonham, reinforced by six companies of the 8th Louisiana and the 11th North Carolina Volunteers., at Mitchell's Ford; Cocke, red be at the Lewis house, in the direction of the firing on our extreme left, and that I was to go there. On reaching General Bonham's position in rear of Mitchell's Ford, he informed me that I would have to move through the fields towards the left tacross Bull Run, some distance below, moving in good order in the direction of Centreville. I at first supposed it to be Bonham's brigade moving from Mitchell's Ford, but it turned out to be Kershaw's and Cash's regiments of that brigade, which had preceded me to the battlefield and were now moving in pursuit, after having crossed at or below Stone Bridge. Bonham's position at Mitchell's Ford was entirely too far off for his movement to, be observed. As soon as Mr. Davis left me, I moved m
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