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Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
and west of it for a distance of fully ten miles; the whole of this line being intrenched, and made stronger every day they remained there. In the latter part of July Sherman sent [George] Stoneman to destroy the railroads to the south, about Macon. He was then to go east and, if possible, release our prisoners about Andersonville. There were painful stories current at the time about the great hardships these prisoners had to endure in the way of general bad treatment, in the way in which. This cut Sherman off from communication with the North for several days. Sherman responded to this attack on his lines of communication by directing one upon theirs. [Judson] Kilpatrick started on the night of the 18th of August to reach the Macon road about Jonesboro. He succeeded in doing so, passed entirely around the Confederate lines of Atlanta, and was back again in his former position on our left by the 22d. These little affairs, however, contributed but very little to the grand r
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
assing from one column to another, was instantly killed. In his death the army lost one of its ablest, purest and best generals. [Kenner] Garrard had been sent out with his cavalry to get upon the railroad east of Atlanta and to cut it in the direction of Augusta. He was successful in this, and returned about the time of the battle. [Lovell H.] Rousseau had also come up from Tennessee with a small division of cavalry, having crossed the Tennessee River about Decatur and made a raid into Alabama. Finally, when hard pressed, he had come in, striking the railroad in rear of Sherman, and reported to him about this time. The battle of the 22d is usually known as the Battle of Atlanta, although the city did not fall into our hands until the 2d of September. Preparations went on, as before, to flank the enemy out of his position. The work was tedious, and the lines that had to be maintained were very long. Our troops were gradually worked around to the east until they struck the
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
gades under Fuller and Mersy they took 351 prisoners, representing forty-nine different regiments, eight brigades and three divisions; and brought back eight battle flags from the enemy. It was during this battle that McPherson, while passing from one column to another, was instantly killed. In his death the army lost one of its ablest, purest and best generals. [Kenner] Garrard had been sent out with his cavalry to get upon the railroad east of Atlanta and to cut it in the direction of Augusta. He was successful in this, and returned about the time of the battle. [Lovell H.] Rousseau had also come up from Tennessee with a small division of cavalry, having crossed the Tennessee River about Decatur and made a raid into Alabama. Finally, when hard pressed, he had come in, striking the railroad in rear of Sherman, and reported to him about this time. The battle of the 22d is usually known as the Battle of Atlanta, although the city did not fall into our hands until the 2d of S
Allatoona (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
It was the 23d of May before the road was finished up to the rear of Sherman's army and the pursuit renewed. This pursuit brought him up to the vicinity of Allatoona. This place was very strongly intrenched, and naturally a very defensible position. An assault upon it was not thought of, but preparations were made to flank e railroad. This was the case more particularly with the cavalry. By the 4th of June Johnston found that he was being hemmed in so rapidly that he drew off and Allatoona was left in our possession. Allatoona, being an important place, was strongly intrenched for occupation by our troops before advancing farther, and made a seAllatoona, being an important place, was strongly intrenched for occupation by our troops before advancing farther, and made a secondary base of supplies. The railroad was finished up to that point, the intrenchments completed, store-houses provided for food, and the army got in readiness for a further advance. The rains, however, were falling in such torrents that it was impossible to move the army by the side roads which they would have to move upon in o
Peach Tree Creek (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
y might then have abandoned the contest and agreed to a separation. Atlanta was very strongly intrenched all the way around in a circle about a mile and a half outside of the city. In addition to this, there were advanced intrenchments which had to be taken before a close siege could be commenced. Sure enough, as indicated by the change of commanders, the enemy was about to assume the offensive. On the 20th he came out and attacked the Army of the Cumberland most furiously [at Peach Tree Creek]. Hooker's corps, and Newton's and Johnson's divisions were the principal ones engaged in this contest, which lasted more than an hour; but the Confederates were then forced to fall back inside their main lines. The losses were quite heavy on both sides. On this day General [Walter Q.] Gresham, since our Postmaster-General, was very badly wounded. During the night Hood abandoned his outer lines, and our troops were advanced. The investment had not been relinquished for a moment duri
Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
sent around by the right, to come out by the way of Snake Creek Gap into the rear of the enemy. This was a surprise to Johnston, and about the 13th he decided to abandon his position at Dalton. On the 15th there was very hard fighting about Resaca; but our cavalry having been sent around to the right got near the road in the enemy's rear. Again Johnston fell back, our army pursuing. The pursuit was continued to Kingston, which was reached on the 19th with very little fighting, except thahave arisen with Palmer as to whether Schofield had any right to command him. If he did raise this question while an action was going on, that act alone was exceedingly reprehensible. About the same time Wheeler got upon our railroad north of Resaca and destroyed it nearly up to Dalton. This cut Sherman off from communication with the North for several days. Sherman responded to this attack on his lines of communication by directing one upon theirs. [Judson] Kilpatrick started on the nigh
Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
ued at once. Sherman had made every preparation to abandon the railroad, leaving a strong guard in his intrenchments. He had intended, moving out with twenty days rations and plenty of ammunition, to come in on the railroad again at the Chattahoochee River. Johnston frustrated this plan by himself starting back as above stated. This time he fell back to the Chattahoochee. About the 5th of July he was besieged again, Sherman getting easy possession of the Chattahoochee River both above Chattahoochee River both above and below him. The enemy was again flanked out of his position, or so frightened by flanking movements that on the night of the 9th he fell back across the river. Here Johnston made a stand until the 17th, when Sherman's old tactics prevailed again and the final movement toward Atlanta began. Johnston was now relieved of the command, and [John B.] Hood superseded him. Johnston's tactics in this campaign do not seem to have met with much favor, either in the eyes of the administration a
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
r departments and embraced all the territory west of the Allegheny Mountains and east of the Mississippi River, together with the State of Arkansas in the trans-Mississippi. The most easterly of these was the Department of the Ohio, General Schofield commanding; the next was the Department of the Cumberland, General Thomas commanding; the third the Department of the Tennessee, General McPherson commanding; and General Steele still commanded the trans-Mississippi, or Department of Arkansas. The last-named department was so far away that Sherman could not communicate with it very readily after starting on his spring campaign, and it was therefore soon transfot yet expired, and they were not back. Then, again, Sherman had lent Banks two divisions under A. J. Smith, the winter before, to co-operate with the trans-Mississippi forces, and this with the express pledge that they should be back by a time specified, so as to be prepared for this very campaign. It is hardly necessary to s
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
ht to command him. If he did raise this question while an action was going on, that act alone was exceedingly reprehensible. About the same time Wheeler got upon our railroad north of Resaca and destroyed it nearly up to Dalton. This cut Sherman off from communication with the North for several days. Sherman responded to this attack on his lines of communication by directing one upon theirs. [Judson] Kilpatrick started on the night of the 18th of August to reach the Macon road about Jonesboro. He succeeded in doing so, passed entirely around the Confederate lines of Atlanta, and was back again in his former position on our left by the 22d. These little affairs, however, contributed but very little to the grand result. They annoyed, it is true, but any damage thus done to a railroad by any cavalry expedition is soon repaired. Sherman made preparations for a repetition of his tactics; that is, for a flank movement with as large a force as could be got together to some poin
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 49
Sherman's campaign in Georgia-siege of Atlanta --death of General McPherson-attempt to capture Aw of destroying Johnston's army and capturing Atlanta. He visited each of these commands to inforone-fourth of the way between Chattanooga and Atlanta. The country is mountainous all the way to Aalton is on ground where water drains towards Atlanta and into one of the main streams rising northome into the road running from Chattanooga to Atlanta a good distance to the rear of the point Johncontrary, weeks were spent at some; and about Atlanta more than a month was consumed. It was thd the contest and agreed to a separation. Atlanta was very strongly intrenched all the way aroup towards the railroad twenty miles south of Atlanta. Here he found Hardee intrenched, ready to m of the city, moved in and took possession of Atlanta, and notified Sherman. Sherman then moved dst after their arduous campaign. The city of Atlanta was turned into a military base. The citizen[10 more...]
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