hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
W. T. Sherman 925 7 Browse Search
P. H. Sheridan 435 3 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 320 0 Browse Search
W. S. Hancock 281 3 Browse Search
A. E. Burnside 266 2 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 260 0 Browse Search
G. K. Warren 251 1 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 226 16 Browse Search
George H. Thomas 220 6 Browse Search
James B. McPherson 215 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. Search the whole document.

Found 228 total hits in 35 results.

1 2 3 4
Farmville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
e 4th I learned that Lee had ordered rations up from Danville for his famishing army, and that they were to meet him at Farmville. This showed that Lee had already abandoned the idea of following the railroad down to Danville, but had determined to go farther west, by the way of Farmville. I notified Sheridan of this and directed him to get possession of the road before the supplies could reach Lee. He responded that he had already sent Crook's division to get upon the road between Burkesvih struggle with Lee to get south to his provisions. Sheridan, thinking the enemy might turn off immediately towards Farmville, moved Davies's brigade of cavalry out to watch him. Davies found the movement had already commenced. He attacked and le and there intrench himself for the night, and in the morning to move west to cut off all the roads between there and Farmville. I then started with a few of my staff and a very small escort of cavalry, going directly through the woods, to joi
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
presume, most of them were forced to cross. On the morning of the 4th I learned that Lee had ordered rations up from Danville for his famishing army, and that they were to meet him at Farmville. This showed that Lee had already abandoned the idea of following the railroad down to Danville, but had determined to go farther west, by the way of Farmville. I notified Sheridan of this and directed him to get possession of the road before the supplies could reach Lee. He responded that he had an of Jetersville and in the telegraph office, they found a dispatch from Lee, ordering two hundred thousand rations from Danville. The dispatch had not been sent, but Sheridan sent a special messenger with it to Burkesville and had it forwarded from there. In the meantime, however, dispatches from other sources had reached Danville, and they knew there that our army was on the line of the road; so that they sent no further supplies from that quarter. At this time Merritt and Mackenzie, wit
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 65
ly by telegraph. Mr. Lincoln knew that it had been arranged for Sherman to join me at a fixed time, to co-operate in the destruction of Lee's army. I told him that I had been very anxious to have the Eastern armies vanquish their old enemy who had so long resisted all their repeated and gallant attempts to subdue them or drive them from their capital. The Western armies had been in the main successful until they had conquered all the territory from the Mississippi River to the State of North Carolina, and were now almost ready to knock at the back door of Richmond, asking admittance. I said to him that if the Western armies should be even upon the field, operating against Richmond and Lee, the credit would be given to them for the capture, by politicians and non-combatants from the section of country which those troops hailed from. It might lead to disagreeable bickerings between members of Congress of the East and those of the West in some of their debates. Western members
d in the telegraph office, they found a dispatch from Lee, ordering two hundred thousand rations from Danville.ners and forced the abandonment of some property. Lee intrenched himself at Amelia Court House, and also hie corps of infantry with a little cavalry confronting Lee's entire army. Meade, always prompt in obeying orderde was making, and suggested that he might now attack Lee. We had now no other objective than the Confederate aed from Sheridan the following dispatch: The whole of Lee's army is at or near Amelia Court House, and on this miles beyond, on the Danville Road, last night. General Lee is at Amelia Court House in person. They are outoint. It now became a life and death struggle with Lee to get south to his provisions. Sheridan, thinkinittle time, Sheridan explaining to me what he thought Lee was trying to do, and that Meade's orders, if carriednemy to escape, and besides that, I had no doubt that Lee was moving right then. Meade changed his orders at o
H. G. Wright (search for this): chapter 65
ad so that it was impossible to get on. Then, again, our cavalry had struck some of the enemy and were pursuing them; and the orders were that the roads should be given up to the cavalry whenever they appeared. This caused further delay. General Wright, who was in command of one of the corps which were left back, thought to gain time by letting his men go into bivouac and trying to get up some rations for them, and clearing out the road, so that when they did start they would be uninterrupte one corps of infantry with a little cavalry confronting Lee's entire army. Meade, always prompt in obeying orders, now pushed forward with great energy, although he was himself sick and hardly able to be out of bed. Humphreys moved at two, and Wright at three o'clock in the morning, without rations, as I have said, the wagons being far in the rear. I stayed that night at Wilson's Station on the South Side Railroad. On the morning of the 5th I sent word to Sheridan of the progress Meade w
ailroad to the south side of the Appomattox River as speedily as possible. He replied that he already had some of his command nine miles out. I then ordered the rest of the Army of the Potomac under Meade to follow the same road in the morning. Parke's corps followed by the same road, and the Army of the James was directed to follow the road which ran alongside of the South Side Railroad to Burke's Station, and to repair the railroad and telegraph as they proceeded. That road was a 5 feet g of the army moved directly for Jetersville by two roads. After I had received the dispatch from Sheridan saying that Crook was on the Danville Road, I immediately ordered Meade to make a forced march with the Army of the Potomac, and to send Parke's corps across from the road they were on to the South Side Railroad, to fall in the rear of the Army of the James and to protect the railroad which that army was repairing as it went along. Our troops took possession of Jetersville and in th
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 65
at Richmond, during the day, of the condition of affairs, and told them it would be impossible for him to hold out longer than night, if he could hold out that long. Davis was at church when he received Lee's dispatch. The congregation was dismissed with the notice that there would be no evening service. The rebel government left Richmond about two o'clock in the afternoon of the 2d. At night Lee ordered his troops to assemble at Amelia Court House, his object being to get away, join Johnston if possible, and to try to crush Sherman before I could get there. As soon as I was sure of this I notified Sheridan and directed him to move out on the Danville Railroad to the south side of the Appomattox River as speedily as possible. He replied that he already had some of his command nine miles out. I then ordered the rest of the Army of the Potomac under Meade to follow the same road in the morning. Parke's corps followed by the same road, and the Army of the James was directed to f
h I sent word to Sheridan of the progress Meade was making, and suggested that he might now attack Lee. We had now no other objective than the Confederate armies, and I was anxious to close the thing up at once. On the 5th I marched again with Ord's command until within about ten miles of Burkesville, where I stopped to let his army pass. I then received from Sheridan the following dispatch: The whole of Lee's army is at or near Amelia Court House, and on this side of it. General Davies, wut should be captured he could take this tin-foil out of his pocket and putting it into his mouth, chew it. It would cause no surprise at all to see a Confederate soldier chewing tobacco. It was nearly night when this letter was received. I gave Ord directions to continue his march to Burkesville and there intrench himself for the night, and in the morning to move west to cut off all the roads between there and Farmville. I then started with a few of my staff and a very small escort of ca
George G. Meade (search for this): chapter 65
g the enemy-visit to Sheridan and Meade General Meade and I entered Petersburg on the morning ofprepared work. This statement was made to General Meade and myself when we were together. I had a a point on that road south of Lee, and I told Meade this. He suggested that if Lee was going thatered the rest of the Army of the Potomac under Meade to follow the same road in the morning. Parkeas on the Danville Road, I immediately ordered Meade to make a forced march with the Army of the Ponotified me of the situation. I again ordered Meade up with all dispatch, Sheridan having but the little cavalry confronting Lee's entire army. Meade, always prompt in obeying orders, now pushed fwhat he thought Lee was trying to do, and that Meade's orders, if carried out, moving to the right s headquarters about midnight. I explained to Meade that we did not want to follow the enemy; we w had no doubt that Lee was moving right then. Meade changed his orders at once. They were now giv[8 more...]
Henry E. Davies (search for this): chapter 65
om Sheridan the following dispatch: The whole of Lee's army is at or near Amelia Court House, and on this side of it. General Davies, whom I sent out to Painesville on their right flank, has just captured six pieces of artillery and some wagons. We Lee to get south to his provisions. Sheridan, thinking the enemy might turn off immediately towards Farmville, moved Davies's brigade of cavalry out to watch him. Davies found the movement had already commenced. He attacked and drove away theirDavies found the movement had already commenced. He attacked and drove away their cavalry which was escorting wagons to the west, capturing and burning 180 wagons. He also captured five pieces of artillery. The Confederate infantry then moved against him and probably would have handled him very roughly, but Sheridan had sent two more brigades of cavalry to follow Davies, and they came to his relief in time. A sharp engagement took place between these three brigades of cavalry and the enemy's infantry, but the latter was repulsed. Meade himself reached Jetersville abou
1 2 3 4