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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XIII. April, 1862 (search)
fense at Island No.10 on the Mississippi, has revived his popularity. But, I repeat, he is a doomed man. April 2 Gen. Wise is here with his report of the Roanoke disaster. April 3 Congress is investigating the Roanoke affair. Mr. Benjamity, that the blame and guilt of that great calamity rest solely upon Gen. Huger and Judah P. Benjamin. April 13 Gen. Wise now resolved to ask for another command, to make another effort in defense of his country. But, when he waited upon thd, sir. April 14 There will soon be hard fighting on the Peninsula. April 15 Gen. Beauregard has written to Gen. Wise, offering him a command in his army, if the government will consent to it. It will not be consented to. April 16 s are booming within hearing of the capital? April 24 Webster has been tried, condemned, and hung. April 25 Gen. Wise, through the influence of Gen. Lee, who is a Christian gentleman as well as a consummate general, has been ordered into
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 17 (search)
utenant employed by Gen. Winder to guard the prisoners (the generals and other high Yankee officers), came to me to-day, with a friend who had just arrived from Baltimore, and demanded passports to visit Drewry's Bluff, for the purpose of inspecting the defenses. I refused, fearing he might (I did not like his face) have been corrupted by his prisoners. He said very significantly that he would go in spite of me. This I reported to the Assistant Adjutant- General, and also wrote a note to Gen. Wise, to examine him closely if he came within his lines. July 22 To-day Gen. Winder came into my office in a passion with a passport in his hand which I had given, a week before, to Mr. Collier, of Petersburg, on the order of the Assistant Secretary of War-threatening me with vengeance and the terrors of Castle Godwin, his Bastile if I granted any more passports to Petersburg where he was military commander, that city being likewise under martial law. I simply uttered a defiance, and he
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 19 (search)
s favor the raising of the black flag, asking and giving no quarter hereafter. The yellow fever is raging at Wilmington, North Carolina. The President, in response to a resolution of inquiry concerning Hyde, the agent who procured a substitute and was arrested for it, sent Congress a letter from the Secretary of War, stating that the action of Gen. Winder had not been approved, and that Mr. Hyde had been discharged. The Secretary closes his letter with a sarcasm, which, I think, is not his own composition. He asks, as martial law is still existing, though the writ of habeas corpus is not suspended, for instructions as to the power of the military commander, Winder, to suppress tippling shops! Sev-eral members declared that martial law existed in this city without any constitutional warrant. There is much bad feeling between many members and the Executive. No fighting has occurred on the Peninsula, and I believe Gen. Wise has returned with his forces to Chaffin's Bluff.
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XIX. October, 1862 (search)
ccount. So far, however, the grand speculation has failed. October 3 Gen. Wise was countermanded in his march against Williamsburg, by Major-Gen. Gustavus W had 2700 men, the enemy 1500, and he would have captured and slain them all. Gen. Wise was the trusted and revered Governor of Virginia, while Smith was the Street to be kept in camps of instruction, until better seasoned (a term invented by Gen. Wise) for the field. Senator Brown, of Mississippi, opposed the bill increasinthe cause. The President is much absorbed in the matter of appointments. Gen. Wise was again ordered down the Peninsula last Saturday; and again ordered back wha capricious tyrant, for lifting up Yankees and keeping down great Southern men. Wise, Floyd, etc. are kept in obscurity; while Pemberton, who commanded the MassachusManassas was fought, are made major-generals, and the former put in command over Wise in Virginia, and all the generals in North Carolina. Ripley, another Northern g
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XX. November, 1862 (search)
President is a bold man! He has put in Randolph's place, temporarily at least, Major-Gen. Gustavus W. Smith--who was Street Commissioner in the City of New York, on the day that Capt. G. W. Randolph was fighting the New Yorkers at Bethel! Gen. Wise is out in a card, stating that in response to a requisition for shoes for his suffering troops, Quartermaster-Gen. A. C. Myers said, Let them suffer. The enemy attacked Fredericksburg yesterday, and there was some skirmishing, the result of Gen. M. asks if it is the purpose of the government to abandon Kentucky, and if so, is he not functus officio, being a Kentucky general, commanding Kentucky troops? Col. Myers has placed on file in the department a denial of having said to Gen. Wise's quartermaster, Let them suffer. Several ladies, near relatives of Judge Campbell, Assistant Secretary of War, came over yesterday under flag of truce. They lived, I believe, in Alexandria. Another requisition has been made by the engi
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 22 (search)
Burnside has been removed already and Hooker given the command. Gen. S. Cooper takes sides with Col. Myers against Gen. Wise. Gen. W.'s letter of complaint of the words, Let them suffer, was referred to Gen. C., who insisted upon sending the leermaster-General before either the Secretary or the President saw it,--and it was done. Why do the Northern men here hate Wise? Gen. Lee dispatches to-day that there is a very large amount of corn in the Rappahannock Valley, which can be procure the authorities here, and was dropped out of the list of brigadiers, has been made Governor of South Carolina. And Gen. Wise, who is possessed of perhaps the greatest mind in the Confederacy, is still fettered. They will not let him fight a ba of the enemy's transports appeared yesterday. We must look now for naval operations. Perhaps Weldon is aimed at. Gen. Wise writes a remarkable letter to the department. His son, just seventeen years old, a lieutenant in 10th Virginia Cavalry
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXII. January, 1863 (search)
regard were telegraphed to-day in relation to the movement on Wilmington; and the President had the cabinet with him many hours. Gen. Rains is quite certain that the fall of New Orleans was the result of treachery. By the emancipation, Gen. Wise's county, Princess Ann, is excepted-and so are Accomac and Northampton Counties; but I have no slaves. All I ask of the invaders is to spare my timber, and I will take care of the land — and I ask it, knowing the request will never be known bythat the enemy at Suffolk and Newbern amounted to 45,000; and this force now threatens Weldon and Wilmington, and we have not more than 14,000 to oppose them. With generalship that should suffice. All the Virginia conscripts are ordered to Gen. Wise, under Major-Gen. Elzey. The conscripts from other States are to be taken to Gen. Lee. If the winter should allow a continuance of active operations, and the enemy should continue to press us, we might be driven nearly to the wall. We must h
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXV. April, 1863 (search)
ard for our soldiers. It is supposed they will reappear before Wilmington; our batteries there are ready for them. Gen. Wise assailed the enemy on Saturday, at Williamsburg, captured the town, and drove the Federals into their fortMa-gruder. l, the fugitive Irishman, opens its batteries on the Sentinel. So we go. April 14 We have nothing additional from Gen. Wise's expedition against Williamsburg; but it was deprecated by our people here, whose families and negroes have been left ors to-day, to the effect that Gen. Hill is likely to take Washington and Newbern, N. C.; Gen. Longstreet, Suffolk; and Gen. Wise, Fort Magruder, and the Peninsula-he has not troops enough. Gold advanced 7 per cent. in New York when the news of it is hoped will succeed in bringing off supplies of provision, etc.-such being the object of their demonstrations. Gen. Wise has fallen back, being ordered by Gen. Elzey not to attempt the capture of Fort Magruder--a feat he could have accompli
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 27 (search)
d here, and it might arrive in time. Our defenses are strong; but at this moment we have only-Gen. Wise's brigade, and a few battalions at the batteries, to defend the capital — some 5000 in all. larm subsided about 10 A. M. upon information being received that the enemy were flying before Gen. Wise down the Peninsula. After this the following dispatch was received from Gen. Lee: Milfordfailure of the government to make adequate preparations for the defense of the city. I saw Gen. Wise to-day. He seems weather-beaten, but hardy. May 14 We have been beaten in an engagementy be made. Gen. Dix threatens to hang the citizens of Williamsburg if they co-operate with Gen. Wise in his frequent attacks on the Federals. Gen. Wise replies, threatening to hang Gen. Dix if hGen. Wise replies, threatening to hang Gen. Dix if he carries his threat into execution, and should fall into his hands, in a more summary manner than John Brown was hung for making his raid in Virginia. Butter is worth $4 per pound. A sheep is w
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXVII. June, 1863 (search)
cold blood, and says it is the only mode of dealing with such savages. The President indorses on it that it is a confession of an infamous crime. Yesterday the enemy appeared on the Peninsula, in what numbers we know not yet; but just when Gen. Wise was about to attack, with every prospect of success, an order was received from Gen. Arnold Elzey to fall back toward the city, pickets and all. A letter from Gen. Holmes, containing an account from one of his scouts, shows that the enemy's. They would believe the cabinet meant soon to follow the gold. And some of our military commanders have no better opinion of them than the people. Beauregard once stopped some bullion ordered away by Mr. Memminger. There is a rumor that Gen. Wise had a combat yesterday on the Peninsula. But the operations beyond the Rappahannock, and approaching the capital of the United States, must relieve Richmond of all immediate danger. Mr. Lincoln says he is making history; forgetful of the e
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