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Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
duty here, and, I presume, representing the President himself; but that any one of his staff, unless directing those of inferior rank, ought to give commands by order of Gen. Bragg. Col. N. says that don't satisfy him; and that no general has a right to issue orders to him! The famine is becoming more terrible daily; and soon no salary will suffice to support one's family. The 1st and 2d Auditors and their clerks (several hundred, male and female) have been ordered to proceed to Montgomery, Ala. Perhaps the government will soon remove thither entirely. This is ill-timed, as the enemy will accept it as an indication of an abandonment of the capital; and many of our people will regard it as a preliminary to the evacuation of Richmond. It is more the effect of extortion and high prices, than apprehension of the city being taken by the enemy. April 20 A clear morning, but a cold, cloudy day. The following dispatch from Gen. Forrest shows that the bloody work has commenc
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
t. Warner, being persecuted by the Commissary-General for telling the truth in regard to the rations, etc., is settling his accounts as rapidly as possible, and will resign his office. He says he will resume his old business, publishing books, etc. April 11 Rained all night, but clear most of the day. There are rumors of Burnside landing troops on the Peninsula; also of preparations for movements on the Rappahannock-by which side is uncertain. It is said troops are coming from Mississippi, Lieut.-Gen. (Bishop) Polk's command. The famine is still advancing, and his gaunt proportions loom up daily, as he approaches with gigantic strides. The rich speculators, however, and the officers of influence stationed here, who have secured the favor of the Express Company, get enough to eat. Potatoes sell at $1 per quart; chickens, $35 per pair; turnip greens, $4 per peckI An ounce of meat, daily, is the allowance to each member of my family, the cat and parrot included. The pig
Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
from a conference with Gen. Butler, at Fortress Monroe, and it is announced that arrangements have been made for an immediate resumption of the exchange of prisoners on the old footing. Thus has the government abandoned the ground so proudly assumed — of non-intercourse with Butler, and the press is firing away at it for negotiating with the Beast and outlaw. But our men in captivity are in favor of a speedy exchange, no matter with whom the agreement is made. Forrest has destroyed Paducah, Ky. There is a little quarrel in progress between the Secretaries of War and the Treasury. Some days ago the Postmaster-General got from the President an order that his clerks should be detailed for the use of the department until further orders. The Secretary of the Treasury made an application to the Secretary of War for a similar detail, but it was refused. Mr. Memminger appealed, with some acerbity, to the President, and the President indorsed on the paper that the proper rule woul
Charlottesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
ed. There is an unofficial report that one of our torpedo boats struck the Federal war steamer Minnesota yesterday, near Newport News, and damaged her badly. I learn (from an official source) to-day that Gen. Longstreet's corps is at Charlottesville, to co-operate with Lee's army, which will soon move, no doubt. Gen. Bragg received a dispatch yesterday, requesting that commissary stores for Longstreet be sent to Charlottesville, and he ordered his military secretary to direct the CoCharlottesville, and he ordered his military secretary to direct the Commissary-General accordingly. To this Col. Northrop, C. G. S., took exceptions, and returned the paper, calling the attention of Gen. B.'s secretary to the Rules and Regulations, involving a matter of red tape etiquette. The C. G. S. can only be ordered or directed by the Secretary of War. Gen. B. sent the paper to the Secretary, with the remark that if he is to be restricted, etc., his usefulness must be necessarily diminished. The Secretary sent for Col. N., and I suppose pacified him.
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 38
ts that Gen. Longstreet's impressing officers are taking all, except five bushels of grain and fifty pounds of bacon for each adult — a plenty, one would think, under the circumstances. Senator Hunter has asked and obtained a detail for Mr. Daudridge (under eighteen) as quartermaster's clerk. And Mr. Secretary Seddon has ordered the commissary to let Mrs. Michie have sugar and flour for her family, white and black. Mr. Secretary Benjamin sent over, to-day, for passports to the Mississippi River for two secret agents. What for? Gen. Lee has made regulations to prevent cotton, tobacco, etc. passing his lines into the enemy's country, unless allowed by the government. But, then, several in authority will allow it without limit. I set out sixty-eight early cabbage-plants yesterday. They are now under the snow! April 3 The snow has disappeared; but it is cloudy, with a cold northwest wind. The James River is very high, and all the streams are so much swollen that
Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
ther bright and beautiful day; and vegetation is springing with great rapidity. But nearly all my potatoes, corn, egg-plants, and tomatoes seem to have been killed by the frosts of March. I am replanting corn, lima beans, etc. The other vegetables are growing well. One of my fig-bushes was. killed — that is, nearly all the branches. The roots live. It is rumored that the armies on the Rapidan were drawn up in line. The enemy have again evacuated Suffolk. Gen. Beauregard is at Weldon. Perhaps Burnside may hurl his blows against North Carolina. Food is still advancing in price; and unless relief comes from some quarter soon, this city will be in a deplorable condition. A good many fish, however, are coming in, and shad have fallen in price to $12 per pair. The government ordered the toll of meal here (which the miller, Crenshaw, sold to the people) to be taken for the army; but Col. Northrop, Commissary-General, opposes this; and it is to be hoped, as usual, he
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
uthentic war news, but are on the tip-toe of expectation. The city is in some commotion on a rumor that the non combating population will be required to leave, to avoid transportation of food to the city. Corn is selling at $1.25 per bushel in Georgia and Alabama; here, at $40-such is the deplorable condition of the railroads, or rather of the management of them. Col. Northrop, Commissary-General, said to-day that Gen. Lee and the Secretary of War were responsible for the precarious state ofnds of the Secretary of War. The French ships have gone down the river, without taking much tobacco; said to have been ordered away by the United States Government. Col. W. M. Browne (the President's English A. D.C.), it is said, goes to Georgia as commandant of conscripts for that State. It is probable he offended some one of the President's family, domestic or military. The people had long been offended by his presence and arrogance. The Enquirer, to-day, has a communication ass
Shreveport (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
. Cooper, A. & I. General. The following report was received at Baton Rouge, on the 3d inst., from the Surgeon-General of Banks's army: We met the enemy near Shreveport. Union force repulsed with great loss. How many can you accommodate in hospitals at Baton Rouge? Steamer Essex, or Benton, destroyed by torpedoes in Red Riveis indicates a battle on the Rapidan. April 16 Rained all night% and in fitful showers all day. We have more accounts (unofficial) of a victory near Shreveport, La. One of the enemy's gun-boats has been blown up and sunk in Florida. By late Northern arrivals we see that a Mr. Long, member of Congress, has spoken in fam advancing for want of rations. April 25 A bright and beautiful day; southern breezes. No reliable war news; but there are rumors that our victory at Shreveport was a great one. Nothing additional from North Carolina, though something further must soon occur there. It is said the enemy's killed and wounded at Plymouth
Demopolis (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
ernment will soon remove thither entirely. This is ill-timed, as the enemy will accept it as an indication of an abandonment of the capital; and many of our people will regard it as a preliminary to the evacuation of Richmond. It is more the effect of extortion and high prices, than apprehension of the city being taken by the enemy. April 20 A clear morning, but a cold, cloudy day. The following dispatch from Gen. Forrest shows that the bloody work has commenced in earnest: Demopolis, Ala., April 19th. to Gen. S. Cooper. The following dispatch has just been received from Gen. Forrest, dated Jackson, Tenn., April 15th. L. Polk, Lieut.-General. I attacked Fort Pillow on the morning of the 12th inst., with a part of Bell's and McCulloch's brigades, numbering--, under Brig.-Gen. J. R. Chalmers. After a short fight we drove the enemy, seven hundred strong, into the fort, under cover of their gun-boats, and demanded a surrender, which was declined by Major L. W. Boot
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
t. Potatoes sell at $1 per quart; chickens, $35 per pair; turnip greens, $4 per peckI An ounce of meat, daily, is the allowance to each member of my family, the cat and parrot included. The pigeons of my neighbor have disappeared. Every day we have accounts of robberies, the preceding night, of cows, pigs, bacon, flour — and even the setting hens are taken from their nests! April 12 Cloudy — rained in the afternoon. This is the anniversary of the first gun of the war, fired at Fort Sumter. It is still said and believed that Gen. Lee will take the initiative, and attack Grant. The following shows that we have had another success: Mobile, April 11th, 1864. To Gen. S. Cooper, A. & I. General. The following report was received at Baton Rouge, on the 3d inst., from the Surgeon-General of Banks's army: We met the enemy near Shreveport. Union force repulsed with great loss. How many can you accommodate in hospitals at Baton Rouge? Steamer Essex, or Benton, destroyed
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