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Browsing named entities in Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House.

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e. In seeking a point of unity or action for the picture, I was impressed with the conviction that important modifications followed the reading of the Proclamation at the suggestion of the Secretary of State, and I determined upon such an incident as the moment of time to be represented. I was subsequently surprised and gratified when Mr. Lincoln himself, reciting the history of the Proclamation to me, dwelt particularly upon the fact that not only was the time of its issue decided by Secretary Seward's advice, but that one of the most important words in the document was added through his strenuous representations. The central thought of the picture once decided upon and embodied, the rest naturally followed; one after another the seven figures surrounding the President dropped into their places. Those supposed to have held the purpose of the Proclamation as their long conviction, were placed prominently in the foreground in attitudes which indicated their support of the measur
orm and shape in my mind towards the close of the year 1863,--the year made memorable in its dawn by the issue of the final decree. With little experience to adapt me for the execution of such a work, there had nevertheless come to me at times glowing conceptions of the true purpose and character of Art, and an intense desire to do something expressive of appreciation of the great issues involved in the war. The painters of old had delighted in representations of the birth from the ocean of Venus, the goddess of love. Ninety years ago upon this Western continent had been witnessed — no dream of fable, but a substantial fact — the immaculate conception of Constitutional Liberty; and at length through great travail its consummation had been reached. The longprayed — for year of jubilee had come; the bonds of the oppressed were loosed; the prison doors were opened. Behold, said a voice, how a Man may be exalted to a dignity and glory almost divine, and give freedom to a race. Surely<
Schuyler Colfax (search for this): chapter 5
es which indicated their support of the measure; the others were represented in varying moods of discussion or silent deliberation. A few evenings after the completion of the design I went to see a friend who I knew was intimate with the Hon. Schuyler Colfax and Hon. Owen Lovejoy, through whom I hoped to obtain Mr. Lincoln's assent to my plan. I revealed to him my purpose, and asked his assistance in carrying it into effect. During the following week he went to Washington, and in company with Mr. Colfax called upon the President, and laid before him my project. He kindly listened to the details, and then said: In short, if I understand you, you wish me to consent to sit to this artist for the picture? My friends acknowledged this to be the object of their errand. Mr. Lincoln at once, with his accustomed kindness, promised his cooperation. The last day of the year the Hon. Mr. Lovejoy, whom I had never met, but who had become warmly interested in the execution of the work,
Owen Lovejoy (search for this): chapter 5
upport of the measure; the others were represented in varying moods of discussion or silent deliberation. A few evenings after the completion of the design I went to see a friend who I knew was intimate with the Hon. Schuyler Colfax and Hon. Owen Lovejoy, through whom I hoped to obtain Mr. Lincoln's assent to my plan. I revealed to him my purpose, and asked his assistance in carrying it into effect. During the following week he went to Washington, and in company with Mr. Colfax called upo, you wish me to consent to sit to this artist for the picture? My friends acknowledged this to be the object of their errand. Mr. Lincoln at once, with his accustomed kindness, promised his cooperation. The last day of the year the Hon. Mr. Lovejoy, whom I had never met, but who had become warmly interested in the execution of the work, being in New York, called at my studio with the wife of my friend, who had been my earnest advocate. At the close of the interview he remarked, in his
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
e foreground in attitudes which indicated their support of the measure; the others were represented in varying moods of discussion or silent deliberation. A few evenings after the completion of the design I went to see a friend who I knew was intimate with the Hon. Schuyler Colfax and Hon. Owen Lovejoy, through whom I hoped to obtain Mr. Lincoln's assent to my plan. I revealed to him my purpose, and asked his assistance in carrying it into effect. During the following week he went to Washington, and in company with Mr. Colfax called upon the President, and laid before him my project. He kindly listened to the details, and then said: In short, if I understand you, you wish me to consent to sit to this artist for the picture? My friends acknowledged this to be the object of their errand. Mr. Lincoln at once, with his accustomed kindness, promised his cooperation. The last day of the year the Hon. Mr. Lovejoy, whom I had never met, but who had become warmly interested in the
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 6
upon me, and had been forgotten. Suddenly there seemed to come into my mind the words: This man has been sent to you. Full of the singular impression, I laid before him my conception. He heard me through, and then asked if I was sure of President Lincoln's consent and cooperation. I informed him of the pledge which had been given me. Then, said he, you shall paint the picture. Take plenty of time,--make it the great work of your life,--and draw upon me for whatever funds you will require resident Lincoln's consent and cooperation. I informed him of the pledge which had been given me. Then, said he, you shall paint the picture. Take plenty of time,--make it the great work of your life,--and draw upon me for whatever funds you will require to the end. To Mr. Samuel Sinclair, of the New York Tribune, for the introduction to Mr. Lincoln, and to Frederick A. Lane, Esq., of New York, for the generous aid thus extended, I shall ever be indebted for the accomplishment of my work.
; to paint such a picture would consume many months, perhaps years. Enthusiasm alone would never accomplish the work. The few friends to whom I should have felt at liberty to apply for help were not wealthy. Who outside of these could be persuaded that a work of the character and proportions contemplated, undertaken by an artist of no experience in historical studies, would not end in utter failure? I had left my home at the usual hour one morning, pondering the difficulty which, like Bunyan's lions, seemed now to block the way. As one alternative after another presented itself to my mind and was rejected, the prospect appeared less and less hopeful. I at length found myself in Broadway at the foot of the stairs leading up to my studio. A gentleman at this moment attracted my attention, standing with his back towards me, looking at some pictures exposed in the window of the shop below. Detecting, as I thought, something familiar in his air and manner, I waited until he turne
Samuel Sinclair (search for this): chapter 6
art. We had both changed our residences and had not met for years. After a cordial greeting, he accepted my invitation to ascend to the studio. I had heard that he had been successful in some business ventures, but the matter made but little impression upon me, and had been forgotten. Suddenly there seemed to come into my mind the words: This man has been sent to you. Full of the singular impression, I laid before him my conception. He heard me through, and then asked if I was sure of President Lincoln's consent and cooperation. I informed him of the pledge which had been given me. Then, said he, you shall paint the picture. Take plenty of time,--make it the great work of your life,--and draw upon me for whatever funds you will require to the end. To Mr. Samuel Sinclair, of the New York Tribune, for the introduction to Mr. Lincoln, and to Frederick A. Lane, Esq., of New York, for the generous aid thus extended, I shall ever be indebted for the accomplishment of my work.
Frederick A. Lane (search for this): chapter 6
art. We had both changed our residences and had not met for years. After a cordial greeting, he accepted my invitation to ascend to the studio. I had heard that he had been successful in some business ventures, but the matter made but little impression upon me, and had been forgotten. Suddenly there seemed to come into my mind the words: This man has been sent to you. Full of the singular impression, I laid before him my conception. He heard me through, and then asked if I was sure of President Lincoln's consent and cooperation. I informed him of the pledge which had been given me. Then, said he, you shall paint the picture. Take plenty of time,--make it the great work of your life,--and draw upon me for whatever funds you will require to the end. To Mr. Samuel Sinclair, of the New York Tribune, for the introduction to Mr. Lincoln, and to Frederick A. Lane, Esq., of New York, for the generous aid thus extended, I shall ever be indebted for the accomplishment of my work.
Brooklyn (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ed, the prospect appeared less and less hopeful. I at length found myself in Broadway at the foot of the stairs leading up to my studio. A gentleman at this moment attracted my attention, standing with his back towards me, looking at some pictures exposed in the window of the shop below. Detecting, as I thought, something familiar in his air and manner, I waited until he turned his face, and then found I was not mistaken; it was an old acquaintance who five years before lived near me in Brooklyn, engaged in a similar struggle for a livelihood with myself, though his profession was law instead of art. We had both changed our residences and had not met for years. After a cordial greeting, he accepted my invitation to ascend to the studio. I had heard that he had been successful in some business ventures, but the matter made but little impression upon me, and had been forgotten. Suddenly there seemed to come into my mind the words: This man has been sent to you. Full of the si
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