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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ained, I therefore repeat, that the memory of Anne Rutledge was the saddest chapter in Mr. Lincoln's life. In a letter dated Dec. 4, 1866, one of Miss Rutledge's brothers writes: When he first came to New Salem and up to the day of Anne's death Mr. Lincoln was all life and animation. He seemed to see the bright side of every picture. James Rutledge, the father of this interesting girl, was one of the founders of New Salem, having come there from Kentucky in 1829. He was born in South Carolina and belonged to the noted Rutledge family of that State. I knew him as early as 1833, and have often shared the hospitality of his home. My father was a politician and an extensive stock dealer in that early day, and he and Mr. Rutledge were great friends. The latter was a man of no little force of character; those who knew him best loved him the most. Like other Southern people he was warm,--almost to impulsiveness,--social, and generous. His hospitality, an inherited quality that
L. M. Greene (search for this): chapter 7
ch irregular and uneven stitches that the older and more sedate women noted it, and the owner of the quilt, until a few years ago still retaining it as a precious souvenir, pointed out the memorable stitches to such persons as visited her. L. M. Greene, who remembered Anne well, says, She was amiable and of exquisite beauty, and her intellect was quick, deep, and philosophic as well as brilliant. She had a heart as gentle and kind as an angel, and full of love and sympathy. Her sweet and angelic nature was noted by every one who met her. She was a woman worthy of Lincoln's love. This is a little overstated as to beauty — Greene writes as if he too had been in love with her — but is otherwise nearly correct. Miss Rutledge, says a lady Mrs. Hardin Bale. who knew her, had auburn hair, blue eyes, fair complexion. She was pretty, slightly slender, but in everything a good hearted young woman. She was about five feet two inches high, and weighed in the neighborhood of a hund
John G. Nicolay (search for this): chapter 7
inder of his days. For the first time our hero falls in love. The courtship with Anne Rutledge and her untimely death form the saddest page in Mr. Lincoln's history. I am aware that most of his biographers have taken issue with me on this phase of Mr. Lincoln's life. Arnold says: The picture has been somewhat too highly colored, and the story made rather too tragic. Dr. Holland and others omit the subject altogether, while the most recent biography — the admirable history by my friends Nicolay and Hay --devotes but five lines to it. I knew Miss Rutledge myself, as well as her father and other members of the family, and have been personally acquainted with every one of the score or more of witnesses whom I at one time or another interviewed on this delicate subject. From my own knowledge and the information thus obtained, I therefore repeat, that the memory of Anne Rutledge was the saddest chapter in Mr. Lincoln's life. In a letter dated Dec. 4, 1866, one of Miss Rutledge's b
is days. For the first time our hero falls in love. The courtship with Anne Rutledge and her untimely death form the saddest page in Mr. Lincoln's history. I am aware that most of his biographers have taken issue with me on this phase of Mr. Lincoln's life. Arnold says: The picture has been somewhat too highly colored, and the story made rather too tragic. Dr. Holland and others omit the subject altogether, while the most recent biography — the admirable history by my friends Nicolay and Hay --devotes but five lines to it. I knew Miss Rutledge myself, as well as her father and other members of the family, and have been personally acquainted with every one of the score or more of witnesses whom I at one time or another interviewed on this delicate subject. From my own knowledge and the information thus obtained, I therefore repeat, that the memory of Anne Rutledge was the saddest chapter in Mr. Lincoln's life. In a letter dated Dec. 4, 1866, one of Miss Rutledge's brothers wr
James McNamar (search for this): chapter 7
be proud? letter to Dr. Drake. return of McNamar. Since the days when in Indiana, Lincoln sil was an assumed one; that his real name was McNamar. I left behind me in New York, he said, mt the girl's instinct was a better guide, and McNamar proved to be all that he said he was, althou of cruel desertion. The change of McNeil to McNamar had wrought in their minds a change of sentimand of Miss Rutledge. Lincoln had learned of McNamar's strange conduct, and conjecturing that all rrow,--the unexplained and painful absence of McNamar,--which, no doubt, made her all the more inteJacksonville, in company with her brother. McNamar seems to have considered Lincoln's bashfulnesedges and all New Salem encouraged his suit. McNamar's unexplained absence and apparent neglect fumiss to suggest before I pass from mention of McNamar that, true to his promise, he drove into New oods. Anne Rutledge had meanwhile died, and McNamar could only muse in silence over the fading vi[5 more...]
Hardin Bale (search for this): chapter 7
bered Anne well, says, She was amiable and of exquisite beauty, and her intellect was quick, deep, and philosophic as well as brilliant. She had a heart as gentle and kind as an angel, and full of love and sympathy. Her sweet and angelic nature was noted by every one who met her. She was a woman worthy of Lincoln's love. This is a little overstated as to beauty — Greene writes as if he too had been in love with her — but is otherwise nearly correct. Miss Rutledge, says a lady Mrs. Hardin Bale. who knew her, had auburn hair, blue eyes, fair complexion. She was pretty, slightly slender, but in everything a good hearted young woman. She was about five feet two inches high, and weighed in the neighborhood of a hundred and twenty pounds. She was beloved by all who knew her. She died as it were of grief. In speaking of her death and her grave, Lincoln once said to me. My heart lies buried there. Before narrating the details of Lincoln's courtship with Miss Rutledge, it is p
William Greene (search for this): chapter 7
f great mental depression, and wandered up and down the river and into the woods woefully abstracted — at times in the deepest distress. If, when we read what the many credible persons who knew him at the time tell us, we do not conclude that he was deranged, we must admit that he walked on that sharp and narrow line which divides sanity from insanity. To one friend he complained that the thought that the snows and rains fall upon her grave filled him with indescribable grief. Letter, Wm. Greene, Ms., May 29, 1865. He was watched with especial vigilance during damp, stormy days, under the belief that dark and gloomy weather might produce such a depression of spirits as to induce him to take his own life. His condition finally became so alarming, his friends consulted together and sent him to the house of a kind friend, Bowlin Greene, who lived in a secluded spot hidden by the hills, a mile south of town. Here he remained for some weeks under the care and ever watchful eye of th
J. G. Holland (search for this): chapter 7
er the grand passion of his life — a romance of much reality, the memory of which threw a melancholy shade over the remainder of his days. For the first time our hero falls in love. The courtship with Anne Rutledge and her untimely death form the saddest page in Mr. Lincoln's history. I am aware that most of his biographers have taken issue with me on this phase of Mr. Lincoln's life. Arnold says: The picture has been somewhat too highly colored, and the story made rather too tragic. Dr. Holland and others omit the subject altogether, while the most recent biography — the admirable history by my friends Nicolay and Hay --devotes but five lines to it. I knew Miss Rutledge myself, as well as her father and other members of the family, and have been personally acquainted with every one of the score or more of witnesses whom I at one time or another interviewed on this delicate subject. From my own knowledge and the information thus obtained, I therefore repeat, that the memory of A
A. Y. Ellis (search for this): chapter 7
ndence ceased altogether. At this point we are favored with the introduction of the ungainly Lincoln, as a suitor for the hand of Miss Rutledge. Lincoln had learned of McNamar's strange conduct, and conjecturing that all the silken ties that bound the two together had been sundered, ventured to step in himself. He had seen the young lady when a mere girl at Mentor Graham's school, and he, no doubt, then had formed a high opinion of her qualities. But he was too bashful, as his friend Ellis declares, to tell her of it. No doubt, when he began to pay her attentions she was the most attractive young lady whom up to that time he had ever met. She was not only modest and winning in her ways, and full of good, womanly common-sense, but withal refined, in contrast with the uncultured people who surrounded both herself and Lincoln. She had a secret, too, and a sorrow,--the unexplained and painful absence of McNamar,--which, no doubt, made her all the more interesting to him whose spi
John McNeil (search for this): chapter 7
th Anne Rutledge. the old story. description of the girl. the affair with John McNeil. departure of McNeil for New York. Anne learns of the change of name. herMcNeil for New York. Anne learns of the change of name. her faith under fire. Lincoln appears on the scene. Courting in dead earnest. Lincoln's proposal accepted. the ghost of another love. death of Anne. effect on Linc in these pages, and who flourished in and around New Salem from 1829 to 1860. McNeil fell deeply in love with the school-girl — she was then only seventeen--and paiielded up the contest early. Anne rejected him, and he dropped from the race. McNeil had clear sailing from this time forward. He was acquiring property and money t price, and thus managed to get along. After managing thus for several years, McNeil, having disposed of his interest in the store to Hill, determined to return to s Rutledge. Her friends encouraged the idea of cruel desertion. The change of McNeil to McNamar had wrought in their minds a change of sentiment. Some contended th
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