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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
lery, succeeded in repulsing the enemy in that quarter. The four guns on General Kimball's line also assisted in checking the enemy's charge in their front. On the 22d of July I moved to a position on General Newton's line, within two miles of Atlanta. I remained with General Newton's division, with slight changes of position on the line, and firing occasionally, until July 31, when four pieces were relieved and went into camp one mile in the rear of the lines. One section remained hear the right of Second Division, Fourth Army Corps. On the 25th of August I marched with the Artillery Brigade, Fourth Army Corps, to the west of Atlanta, and went into camp near works formerly occupied by the Sixteenth Army Corps. August 26, four guns of my battery were held as rear guard, with General Kimball's division. From this time until the 31st I marched with the Artillery Brigade, when I was ordered into position on General Newton's line. I remained with his division during the day
Tunnel Hill (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
No. 83. report of Capt. Wilbur F. Goodspeed, Battery a, First Ohio Light artillery. Hdqrs. Battery A, First Ohio Light artillery, In the Field, Ga., September 7, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to report as follows the operations of my battery from May 7, 1864, up to this date: I joined the Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, on the evening of May 6 at Catoosa Springs, Ga., and marched with it the morning following toward Tunnel Hill. I took several positions during the day as the division advanced, but did no firing, no position being found for my battery. I lay in reserve near Rocky Face Ridge until the morning of the 12th, when I moved with the division and took a position in the gap to the left of Rocky Face, where I remained during that day and the night following. May 13, I marched with the division through Dalton. May 14, I took position in reserve in rear of General Newton's lines near Resaca, Ga., but did not become engaged. At daylight on the morning of t
Marietta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
s half a mile to the left on the line. On the 2d of July I moved the battery half a mile to the left and relieved Battery I, First Ohio Light Artillery. On the morning of July 3, the enemy having evacuated, I moved with the division through Marietta and went into camp about four miles from that place. On July 4 took up position on General Newton's line, but did no firing. On July 5 I moved to the Chattahoochee River and took a position, by command of Captain Bridges, on a hill commanding ral Newton's line. On the 18th I moved with the division to Buck Head, and was placed on General Newton's left. On the 19th I marched with General Newton from Buck Head to Peach Tree Creek, and placed my guns in position near the bridge on the Marietta road. On the 20th I moved the battery across Peach Tree Creek, and placed four guns on General Newton's line, between General Kimball's and Colonel Blake's brigades, holding one section in reserve. About 3 o'clock the enemy charged our lines a
Kenesaw Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
division to the new line, just inside the enemy's former line, and nearly at right angles with it, being supported by Brigadier-General Wood's division. I fired about 175 rounds of shot and shell by volleys from 4 o'clock to 6 p. m. June 18, I advanced my battery 800 yards, and occupied some slight works. Fired at intervals during the day 457 rounds, but could not see the effect of the shot. On the 19th of June, the enemy having again fallen back, I moved forward to near the foot of Kenesaw Mountain, firing at different points as opportunity offered. I rested at night in position on the left of the main road near an old cotton press. On the afternoon of the 20th I advanced half a mile to the front and occupied some slight works, with General Harker's brigade for support. I opened fire, by order of General Newton, about 3 o'clock, simultaneously with Captain Spencer, of Battery M, First Illinois Artillery. The enemy replied vigorously from a battery in front and another situated
Kingston, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
ain Aleshire, chief of artillery, Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, I withdrew my battery to the rear half a mile and rested. I had no men wounded by the enemy during the engagement. On the morning of May 16, the enemy having evacuated Resaca, I marched with the division, without being ordered into position, until the evening of the 17th, when I took position near Adairsville, but did no firing. I continued moving with the division the 18th and 19th, passing through Adairsville and Kingston, and went into camp on the 20th near Cassville, Ga., where I remained resting three days. I resumed the march with the division May 23, 24, and 25, moving toward Dallas, Ga. On the afternoon of May 2.6 I crossed Pumpkin Vine Creek and placed one section of my battery in position on the front line of General Wagner's brigade. This section was relieved on the afternoon of the 27th by a section of Battery M, First Illinois Artillery. At 11 p. m. of the same day my battery relieved Captain Mc
Rocky Face Ridge (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
irst Ohio Light artillery, In the Field, Ga., September 7, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to report as follows the operations of my battery from May 7, 1864, up to this date: I joined the Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, on the evening of May 6 at Catoosa Springs, Ga., and marched with it the morning following toward Tunnel Hill. I took several positions during the day as the division advanced, but did no firing, no position being found for my battery. I lay in reserve near Rocky Face Ridge until the morning of the 12th, when I moved with the division and took a position in the gap to the left of Rocky Face, where I remained during that day and the night following. May 13, I marched with the division through Dalton. May 14, I took position in reserve in rear of General Newton's lines near Resaca, Ga., but did not become engaged. At daylight on the morning of the 15th I took position on the front line of works 400 yards distant from the enemy's works, supported by Genera
Rocky Face (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
rations of my battery from May 7, 1864, up to this date: I joined the Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, on the evening of May 6 at Catoosa Springs, Ga., and marched with it the morning following toward Tunnel Hill. I took several positions during the day as the division advanced, but did no firing, no position being found for my battery. I lay in reserve near Rocky Face Ridge until the morning of the 12th, when I moved with the division and took a position in the gap to the left of Rocky Face, where I remained during that day and the night following. May 13, I marched with the division through Dalton. May 14, I took position in reserve in rear of General Newton's lines near Resaca, Ga., but did not become engaged. At daylight on the morning of the 15th I took position on the front line of works 400 yards distant from the enemy's works, supported by General Wagner's brigade, and opened fire for the first time about 9 o'clock. Had three premature discharges, by which 4 of my m
Peach Tree Creek (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
rossed the Chattahoochee River and put four guns in position on General Newton's line. On the 18th I moved with the division to Buck Head, and was placed on General Newton's left. On the 19th I marched with General Newton from Buck Head to Peach Tree Creek, and placed my guns in position near the bridge on the Marietta road. On the 20th I moved the battery across Peach Tree Creek, and placed four guns on General Newton's line, between General Kimball's and Colonel Blake's brigades, holding onPeach Tree Creek, and placed four guns on General Newton's line, between General Kimball's and Colonel Blake's brigades, holding one section in reserve. About 3 o'clock the enemy charged our lines and passed around our left. I put the reserve section in position fronting to our left, and, with the assistance of Captain Spencer, First Illinois Artillery, and Captain Smith, First Michigan Artillery, succeeded in repulsing the enemy in that quarter. The four guns on General Kimball's line also assisted in checking the enemy's charge in their front. On the 22d of July I moved to a position on General Newton's line, within t
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
with his division during the day. September 1, I marched with General Wagner's brigade near the Macon and Western Railroad, and camped two miles north of Jonesborough. September 2, I marched with the Artillery Brigade, Fourth Army Corps, through Jonesborough, and took position four miles south of this place, and remained thJonesborough, and took position four miles south of this place, and remained there until the 5th. On the afternoon of the 3d one section was sent to the front line, and fired 109 rounds, and then returned to the original position. At dark on the evening of the 5th, I withdrew my pieces, having previously sent my caissons to the rear, by order of chief of artillery, Fourth Army Corps, and marched to the camp of the Artillery Brigade, north of Jonesborough. I have continued marching with the Artillery Brigade, Fourth Army Corps, including the remaining time up to date, without further action. I believe the foregoing report includes the principal actions in which my battery has been engaged during the campaign. To Lieuts. Ch
Lost Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
June 4 my battery was relieved by a battery of the Fifteenth Army Corps, and I withdrew to the rear, by direction of Captain Aleshire, chief of artillery. I had been nine successive days on the line. The fuses of the spherical case and shell that I used were nearly worthless, and not one in twenty would explode. I moved with the division June 6 and 7, and went into camp near Morris' Hill Church, where I remained during June 7, 8, and 9. I marched with the division on the 10th toward Lost Mountain, but remained in reserve until the 15th, when I was ordered into position about one mile from Pine Mountain, with General Wagner's brigade as support. I fired twenty-four rounds of solid shot without eliciting any reply from the enemy, whose works could not be seen. In the evening I moved my battery 600 yards directly to the front, by order of chief of artillery, Second Division, and occupied some works that had been thrown up by pioneers, within 500 yards of the enemy. I improved and
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