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T. L. Crittenden (search for this): chapter 14
armies were in close proximity, and orders received during the night revealed the fact that Rosecrans intended to attack by throwing his left on the enemy's right, with the expectation of driving it in toward Murfreesboroa, so that the right of Crittenden's corps could attack Bragg's centre in reverse, while Thomas supported Crittenden by a simultaneous front assault; and from the movements of the enemy at daylight next morning, it was plainly indicated that Bragg had planned to swing his left oCrittenden by a simultaneous front assault; and from the movements of the enemy at daylight next morning, it was plainly indicated that Bragg had planned to swing his left on our right by an exactly similar manoeuvre, get possession of the railroad and the Nashville pike, and if possible cut us off from our base at Nashville. The conceptions in the minds of the two generals were almost identical; but Bragg took the initiative, beginning his movement about an hour earlier than the time set by Rosecrans, which gained him an immense advantage in execution in the earlier stages of the action. During the evening of the 30th, feeling keenly all the solicitude which
William B. McCreery (search for this): chapter 14
uary, 1863 Third division: (Right Wing, Fourteenth Army Corps) Brigadier-General Philip H. Sheridan. escort: Second Kentucky Cavalry, Co. L. Lieutenant Joseph T. Forman. first brigade: (1) Brigadier-General Joshua W. Sill. (2) Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (1), Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (2), Major Silas Miller. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (3), Captain Porter C. Olson. Eighty-Eighth Illinois, Colonel Francis T. Sherman. Twenty-First Michigan, Lieutenant-Colonel William B. McCreery. Twenty-Fourth Wisconsin, Major Elisha C. Hibbard. Second brigade: (1) Colonel Frederick Schaefer. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Forty-Fourth Illinois, Captain Wallace W. Barrett. Seventy-Third Illinois, Major William A. Presson. Second Missouri (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Second Missouri (2), Major Francis Ehrler. Fifteenth Missouri, Lieutenant-Colonel John Weber. Third brigade: (1) Colonel Georce W. Roberts. (2) Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington.
s that were shelling us so viciously. As he passed to the open ground on my left, I joined him. The enemy seeing this mounted party, turned his guns upon it, and his accurate aim was soon rewarded. for a solid shot carried away the head of Colonel Garesche, the chief-of-staff, and killed or wounded two or three orderlies. Garesche's appalling death stunned us all, and a momentary expression of horror spread over Rosecrans's face; but at such a time the importance of self-control was vital, aGaresche's appalling death stunned us all, and a momentary expression of horror spread over Rosecrans's face; but at such a time the importance of self-control was vital, and he pursued his course with an appearance of indifference, which, however, those immediately about him saw was assumed, for undoubtedly he felt most deeply the death of his friend and trusted staff-officer. No other attacks were made on us to the east of the railroad for the rest of the afternoon, and just before dark I was directed to withdraw and take up a position along the west side of the Nashville pike, on the extreme right of our new line, where Roberts's brigade and the Seventythir
Carle A. Woodruff (search for this): chapter 14
directing its efforts chiefly upon my extreme right, and the front of Woodruffs brigade of Davis's division, which brigade still held on in its first position. In front of my centre the Confederates were again driven back, but as the assault on Woodruff was in conjunction with an advance of the column that had forced Johnson to retire, Woodruff was compelled unfortunately to give way, and two regiments on the right of my line went with him, till they rallied on the two reserve regiments which, Woodruff was compelled unfortunately to give way, and two regiments on the right of my line went with him, till they rallied on the two reserve regiments which, in anticipation of the enemy's initiatory attack I had sent to Sill's rear before daylight. Both Johnson's and Davis's divisions were now practically gone from our line, having retired with a loss of all formation, and they were being closely pursued by the enemy, whose columns were following the arc of a circle that would ultimately carry him in on my rear. In consequence of the fact that this state of things would soon subject me to a fire in reverse, I hastily withdrew Sill's brigade and
Porter C. Olson (search for this): chapter 14
tone River was 4,154 officers and men. battle of Stone River (Murfreesboroa), Tenn., December, 1862, January, 1863 Third division: (Right Wing, Fourteenth Army Corps) Brigadier-General Philip H. Sheridan. escort: Second Kentucky Cavalry, Co. L. Lieutenant Joseph T. Forman. first brigade: (1) Brigadier-General Joshua W. Sill. (2) Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (1), Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (2), Major Silas Miller. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (3), Captain Porter C. Olson. Eighty-Eighth Illinois, Colonel Francis T. Sherman. Twenty-First Michigan, Lieutenant-Colonel William B. McCreery. Twenty-Fourth Wisconsin, Major Elisha C. Hibbard. Second brigade: (1) Colonel Frederick Schaefer. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Forty-Fourth Illinois, Captain Wallace W. Barrett. Seventy-Third Illinois, Major William A. Presson. Second Missouri (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Second Missouri (2), Major Francis Ehrler. Fifteenth Missouri, Lieute
George H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 14
e enemy's right, with the expectation of driving it in toward Murfreesboroa, so that the right of Crittenden's corps could attack Bragg's centre in reverse, while Thomas supported Crittenden by a simultaneous front assault; and from the movements of the enemy at daylight next morning, it was plainly indicated that Bragg had planneould be rallied, however, as the men were badly demoralized, and most of them fell back beyond the Wilkinson pike, where they reorganized behind the troops of General Thomas. At this juncture the enemy's turning-column began advancing again in concert with Cheatham's division, and as the extreme left of the Confederates was dihe pike, bowed out and facing almost west, Cleburn's division of the Confederates confronting it. Davis's division was posted on my right, and Walker's brigade of Thomas's corps, which had reported to me, took up a line that connected my left with Johnson's division. Late in the evening General Rosecrans, accompanied by Genera
Aldace F. Walker (search for this): chapter 14
hville pike, about three miles and a half from Murfreesboroa; my division being aligned to the west of the pike, bowed out and facing almost west, Cleburn's division of the Confederates confronting it. Davis's division was posted on my right, and Walker's brigade of Thomas's corps, which had reported to me, took up a line that connected my left with Johnson's division. Late in the evening General Rosecrans, accompanied by General McCook, and several other officers whose names I am now unablee were in about the same position they had taken up the evening before. Soon after daybreak it became evident that the conflict was to be renewed, and a little later the enemy resumed the offensive by an attack along my left front, especially on Walker's brigade. His attempt was ineffectual, however, and so easily repulsed as to demonstrate that the desperate character of his assaults the day before had nearly exhausted his strength. About 3 o'clock in the afternoon he made another feeble cha
Georce W. Roberts (search for this): chapter 14
T. Sherman. Twenty-First Michigan, Lieutenant-Colonel William B. McCreery. Twenty-Fourth Wisconsin, Major Elisha C. Hibbard. Second brigade: (1) Colonel Frederick Schaefer. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Forty-Fourth Illinois, Captain Wallace W. Barrett. Seventy-Third Illinois, Major William A. Presson. Second Missouri (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Second Missouri (2), Major Francis Ehrler. Fifteenth Missouri, Lieutenant-Colonel John Weber. Third brigade: (1) Colonel Georce W. Roberts. (2) Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. (3) Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Twenty-Second Illinois (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Swanwick. Twenty-Second Illinois (2), Captain Samuel Johnson. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (1), Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (2), Major William A. Schmitt. Forty-Second Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Nathan H. Walworth. Fifty-First Illinois (1), Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Fifty-First Illinois(2), Captain Henry F. Wescott. artillery: Captai
Wallace W. Barrett (search for this): chapter 14
er-General Joshua W. Sill. (2) Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (1), Colonel Nicholas Greusel. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (2), Major Silas Miller. Thirty-Sixth Illinois (3), Captain Porter C. Olson. Eighty-Eighth Illinois, Colonel Francis T. Sherman. Twenty-First Michigan, Lieutenant-Colonel William B. McCreery. Twenty-Fourth Wisconsin, Major Elisha C. Hibbard. Second brigade: (1) Colonel Frederick Schaefer. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Forty-Fourth Illinois, Captain Wallace W. Barrett. Seventy-Third Illinois, Major William A. Presson. Second Missouri (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Laiboldt. Second Missouri (2), Major Francis Ehrler. Fifteenth Missouri, Lieutenant-Colonel John Weber. Third brigade: (1) Colonel Georce W. Roberts. (2) Colonel Fazilo A. Harrington. (3) Colonel Luther P. Bradley. Twenty-Second Illinois (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Swanwick. Twenty-Second Illinois (2), Captain Samuel Johnson. Twenty-Seventh Illinois (1), Colonel Fazilo A. Har
lso attacked me, advancing across an old cotton-field in Sill's front in heavy masses, which were furiously opened upon by Bush's battery from Sill's line, and by Hescock's and Houghtaling's batteries, which had an oblique fire on the field from a cos brigades following. When my division arrived on this new ground, I posted Roberts on Negley's right, with Hescock's and Bush's guns, the brigade and guns occupying a low rocky ridge of limestone, which faced them toward Murfreesboroa, nearly southit could not be done, and we had to abandon them. Hescock also had lost most of his horses, but all his guns were saved. Bush's battery lost two pieces, the tangled underbrush in the dense cedars proving an obstacle to getting them away which his a: Captain Henry Hescock. First Illinois Battery, C. Captain Charles Houghtaling. Fourth Indiana Battery, Captain Asahel K, Bush. First Missouri Battery, G. Captain Henry Hescock. Battery C was attached to the Third Brigade; Fourth Indiana Battery
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