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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. Search the whole document.

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Wapello, Louisa County, Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
, and four from Prairie du Chien, and did not deem any greater force necessary. On the 7th of June, 1831, General Gaines held a council on Rock Island. Black Hawk and his band, in full panoply of war, singing their war-songs, to show they were not afraid, went to the appointed place, but refused to enter the council-room and occupy it with others not immediately interested in the business of the meeting. In compliance with their demand only a few were allowed to remain with Keokuk and Wapello. General Gaines opened the council with a speech, in which he urged the band to remove west of the Mississippi. I replied, That we had never sold our country, . . . and we are determined to hold on to our village. The War Chief, apparently angry, rose and said, Who is Black? Who is Black Hawk? I responded, I am a Sac. My forefather was a Sac, and all the nation call me a Sac. Ask these young men, who have followed me in battle, and you will learn who Black Hawk is. Provoke o
Sandusky, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
did not prove a solace. He considered the Americans interlopers, himself a victim, and came out of prison far more bitter in his hostility than hitherto. A merciless beating, which was given to him while hunting on Two Rivers, by the white settlers, who suspected him of theft, rankled all his life. Another reason for his hatred to the Americans he has touchingly related himself. Black Hawk's last service under the British was in 1813, when Major Croghan repulsed the attack on Fort Stephenson made by Colonel Dixon and the British band. Previous to joining Colonel Dixon, Black Hawk had visited the lodge of an old friend, whose son he had adopted and taught to hunt. He was anxious that this youth should go with him and his band to join the British standard, but the father objected on the ground that he was dependent upon his son for game, and, moreover, that he did not wish him to fight against the Americans, who had always treated him kindly. He had agreed to spend the fol
Michigan (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
vis remembered swearing in some volunteers, but could not substantiate what seems a probable story. Goaded by a sense of injury, Black Hawk and his band crossed the river several times, making predatory incursions either upon the friendly Indians or the whites. Of this General A. C. Dodge wrote: In 1832 we became associated in the famous Black Hawk War, he (Lieutenant Davis) as lieutenant of infantry, and I as aide-de-camp to General Henry Dodge, commanding the militia of Michigan Territory. I often accepted his invitation to partake of his hospitality, as well as that of General (then Captain) William S. Harney and Colonel Zachary Taylor, who often divided their rations with me, as we volunteers were frequently in want of suitable food. The regulars were much better provided for than we volunteers were at that time. They were not only furnished with better rations and more of them, but they had tents, while we had none; and I shall never forget the generous hospit
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
orces, and, though still keeping their community independence, became practically one tribe. The subsequent war with the Six Nations left them too weak to stand alone. La Houton speaks of a Sac village on Fox River in 1689, and Father Hennepin, in r680, speaks of them as Ortagamies, and says they were residents of the Bay of Puants, now Green Bay. Major Forsyth said: More than a century ago all the country commencing above Rock River and running down the Mississippi to the mouth of the Ohio, up that river to the mouth of the Warbash, thence down the Miami of the lake some distance, thence north to the St. Joseph's and Chicago, also the country lying south of the Des Moines, down perhaps to the Mississippi, was inhabited by a numerous nation of Indians who called themselves Linneway or Illini, and were called by others Minneway, signifying men. After many wars, surprises, and massacres in their contests for supremacy against the Sacs, Foxes, and their allies, the four hundred
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
emies with varying success and ever-increasing ferocity. The Illini confederacy claimed the territory on the east bank of the Mississippi, and lived in friendly intercourse with the villagers in the little settlement on the site of the city of St. Louis. Their enemies coveted this beautiful country for winter hunting — grounds, and determined to win it with their battle-axes. The Sacs and Foxes owned no allegiance other than to the English, and made constant predatory, and sometimes murde a more powerful incentive. On Corpus Christi day, May 6, 1779, one thousand two hundred Canadians, reinforced by detachments of Ojibeways, Menomonees, Winnebagoes, Sioux, Sacs, and Foxes, commenced the attack upon the little walled town of St. Louis. The day had been observed always as a holiday, and the citizens were expected to be out looking for wild strawberries; but, fortunately, warned by the rumors of a contemplated attack, only a few had gone to inspect their crops. Some hosti
Iowa River (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
er of Black Hawk's discontent drew on apace, and want came upon him like an armed man. The Indian agents at Fort Armstrong, seeing the friction between the Indians and the white settlers grow with the latter's craving for the promised land that lay flaunting its waving corn-fields in their longing eyes, recommended the removal of the Indians to the west side of the Mississippi River. Keokuk was that most unsafe of all leaders, a compromise man, and was in favor of going quietly to the Iowa River. Black Hawk stood firm in his assertion of the right to occupy the land belonging to his tribe, but the ground was rich, and the prospect was enticing. It was the same old encroachment enacted again, that of might against right. Spurred on by the counsels of Neopope, the Prophet, the nephew of Black Hawk, an astute and bitterly hostile Indian, Black Hawk was more determined not to move his village. He appealed from one agent to another until he had exhausted all the known means of
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
al forces combined to aid the early settlers to drive the Indians not only out of their possessions, but out of existence. Environed by superior numbers on all sides, but inured to hardship and danger, the pioneers pressed forward, their feet red with the blood of both whites and Indians, and acquired acre by acre the lovely country east of the Mississippi. The American Fur Company had their principal post at Mackinac, with outposts scattered at different points on and near the Upper Mississippi. This advance-guard of civilization became wealthy, but took their lives in their hands, and it was an even chance whether they came out with the peltries of animals with which to decorate the potentates and beauties of the old world, or left their scalps to accentuate the figures of a warrior's dance, and their bodies to feed the wild beasts. What these frontiersmen endured is, fortunately, not to be estimated by us from our vantage-ground of peace and security. The atrocities o
Dixon, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ion. There must have been many dramatic occurrences during this period, and the scene is peopled by the ghostly semblance of the men who have fought and died since that day. The Rev. Dr. Harsha, of Omaha, said: General Winfield Scott, when a young man, was stationed at Fort Snelling-at that day perhaps the remotest military outpost in the country. When the Black Hawk War was begun some Illinois militia companies proffered their services. Two lieutenants were sent by Scott to Dixon, Ill., to muster the new soldiers. One of these lieutenants was a very fascinating young man, of easy manners and affable disposition; the other was equally pleasant but extremely modest. On the morning when the muster was to take place, a tall, gawky, slab-sided, homely young man, dressed in a suit of blue jeans, presented himself to the lieutenants as the captain of the recruits, and was duly sworn in. The homely young man was Abraham Lincoln. The bashful lieutenant was he who afterwa
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
a century ago all the country commencing above Rock River and running down the Mississippi to the mouth of the Ohio, up that river to the mouth of the Warbash, thence down the Miami of the lake some distance, thence north to the St. Joseph's and Chicago, also the country lying south of the Des Moines, down perhaps to the Mississippi, was inhabited by a numerous nation of Indians who called themselves Linneway or Illini, and were called by others Minneway, signifying men. After many wars, suuld do anything for us, but both evidently appeared very sorry .. I learned .. . . that our Great Father had exchanged a small strip of the land that was ceded by Quash-qua-me and his party with the Pottowatamies for a portion of their land near Chicago, and that the object of this treaty was to get it back again; that the United States had agreed to give them $16,000 a year for ever for this small strip of land, it being less than the twentieth part of that taken from our nation for $I,000 a y
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
s. One of these lieutenants was a very fascinating young man, of easy manners and affable disposition; the other was equally pleasant but extremely modest. On the morning when the muster was to take place, a tall, gawky, slab-sided, homely young man, dressed in a suit of blue jeans, presented himself to the lieutenants as the captain of the recruits, and was duly sworn in. The homely young man was Abraham Lincoln. The bashful lieutenant was he who afterward fired the first gun from Fort Sumter, Major Anderson. The other lieutenant, who administered the oath, was, in after years, the President of the Confederate States, Jefferson Davis. Dr. Harsha was in Carter Brothers' book store, in New York City, where he chanced to repeat this story to a friend. An elderly gentleman, who was sitting near by listening, arose and remarked that he was happy to be able to confirm the facts, as he was the chaplain at Fort Snelling at the time, and was fully able to corroborate each stateme
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