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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 53
Beauregard addressed to me a communication, proposing that he should be heavily reinforced from General Lee's army, so as to enable him to crush Butler in his intrenchments, and then, with the main body of his own force, together with the detachment from General Lee's army, that he should join General Lee, crush Grant, and march to Washington. Mr. Davis, in Rise and Fall. The following is the communication alluded to above. Confederate States, Headquarters Department North and South Carolina and Virginia, Hancock House, May 18, 1864, 9.30 P. M. Memorandum: The crisis demands prompt and decisive action. For this, the two armies are now too far apart, unless we consent to give up Petersburg, and place the capital in jeopardy. If General Lee will fall back behind the Chickahominy, engaging the enemy so as to draw him on, General Beauregard can bring up fifteen thousand men to unite with Breckenridge and fall upon the enemy's flank with over twenty thousand effectives-thus
Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 53
pon Butler. This, like other of his battles, was to be fought over on paper to establish Beauregard's record. The sequel to the battle of Drury's Bluff was in keeping with Beauregard's efforts to father upon the true and gallant Ewell, Beauregard's shortcomings at First Manassas, when, utterly failing, they were laid upon an unknown and nameless courier; it is but another exemplification of that prolific incapacity which turned the rich fruit of the splendid genius of Sidney Johnston at Shiloh into bitter ashes. Our troops were then withdrawn to an inner and shorter line, closer to the works at Drury's. On the afternoon of the 14th, wrote Mr. Davis, I rode down to visit General Beauregard. A letter from General Beauregard to General Bragg, dated Weldon, April 29th, gave the names of the Federal generals commanding forces on the Southern coast. The arrival, he said, of any of these officers in Virginia would indicate the transfer of their troops thither, and concl
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 53
Chapter 53: battle of Drury's Bluff, May 16, 1864. Grant's plan of campaign was, if he should be unable to defeat Lee, or fail to take Richmond, to cross the James River below Richmond, and possess himself of Petersburg, cut off the supplies from the Confederate Capital, and, reinforced by Butler with 30,000 men, attack it from the south. Butler was ordered to concentrate his troops at City Point. From this base he was to destroy the railroad leading to Richmond. On May 7th he telegls commanding forces on the Southern coast. The arrival, he said, of any of these officers in Virginia would indicate the transfer of their troops thither, and concluded by saying that if it were desired he should operate on the north side of James River, maps ought to be prepared for him, and timbers, etc., for bridges; and that he would serve with pleasure under the immediate command of General Lee, aiding him to crush our enemies, and to achieve the independence of our country. To-day th
Chesterfield (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 53
arter. General Whiting, with some force, was holding a defensive position at Petersburg. General Beauregard proposed that the main part of it should advance and unite with him in an attack upon Butler, wherever he should be found between Drury's and Petersburg. To this I offered distinct objection, because of the hazard, during a battle, of attempting to make a junction of troops moving from opposite sides of the enemy, and proposed that Whiting's command should move at night by the Chesterfield road, where they would not probably be observed by Butler's advance. This march I supposed they could make so as to arrive at Drury's soon after daylight. The next day being Sunday, they could rest, and all the troops being assigned to their positions, they could move to make a concerted attack at daylight on Monday. On Monday morning, I rode down to Drury's, where I found that the enemy had seized our line of intrenchments, it being unoccupied, and that a severe action had occurre
Yellow Tavern (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 53
rmy of 50,000 men, I pushed upon Butler's advance, had a sharp skirmish, and came near capturing a brigade and battery, and Butler withdrew. Some of Beauregard's troops drove him from the railroad and turnpike, at Port Walthall. Upon Beauregard's arrival at Petersburg he was given command as far north as to include Drury's Bluff. While lying near Drury's Bluff on the night of May gth, about ten o'clock, I got a despatch informing me of the fall of J. E. B. Stuart, mortally wounded, at Yellow Tavern, and that Sheridan was expected to assault the outer works north of Richmond, at dawn the next day. Immediately my two movable brigades, Gracie's and Fry's, and a light battery were hastened to and through Richmond, and I arrived with them at the fortifications on Mechanicsville turnpike just in time, the morning of May 10th, to see a battery of artillery there, unsupported by anything, repulse the advance of Sheridan. During the night the clerks and citizens, under General Custis Lee,
Custis Lee (search for this): chapter 53
the night the clerks and citizens, under General Custis Lee, had spread a thin line along part of thith pleasure under the immediate command of General Lee, aiding him to crush our enemies, and to acder any general who ranks him. The right of General Lee to command would be derived from his superig that he should be heavily reinforced from General Lee's army, so as to enable him to crush Butlerurg, and place the capital in jeopardy. If General Lee will fall back behind the Chickahominy, engregard to return, with a reinforcement from General Lee, to drive Butler from before Petersburg, anpresented is one of starvation. Without it General Lee must eventually fall back before Grant's heent, and is referred to you for attention. General Lee is best informed of his situation, and his General Lee. If that be done immediately, General Lee's correspondence warrants the belief that hquired that the memoranda should be sent to General Lee, who, as soon as its purport was communicat[3 more...]
ommunication with North Carolina; and impossible to hold our present line in front of Butler with a much reduced force. At present three thousand men can be spared with safety. Day after to-morrow two thousand more, perhaps, as our lines will probably be stronger, if, as we expect, the forward line can be occupied to-day. (Signed) P. T. Beauregard, General Commanding. Endorsement on the above: General Bragg, Commanding, etc., etc. This memorandum was handed to me this day by Colonel Melton, A. & I. General's Department, and is referred to you for attention. General Lee is best informed of his situation, and his ability is too well established to incline me to adopt the opinion of anyone at a distance as to the movements which his army should make, either for its preservation or the protection of its communications. If fifteen thousand men can be spared for the flank movement proposed, certainly ten thousand may be sent to reinforce General Lee. If that be done immedi
ely my two movable brigades, Gracie's and Fry's, and a light battery were hastened to and through Richmond, and I arrived with them at the fortifications on Mechanicsville turnpike just in time, the morning of May 10th, to see a battery of artillery there, unsupported by anything, repulse the advance of Sheridan. During the night the clerks and citizens, under General Custis Lee, had spread a thin line along part of the fortifications toward the west, near the Brook and Meadow Bridge roads. Hunton's brigade was at Chafin's Bluff, it being impracticable to withdraw it from that position. As the day advanced Gracie's brigade was thrown in front of the works and pressed forward to feel Sheridan, but it was soon evident that we could make no real impression on him, and I regarded it as almost madness with two small brigades to engage in an open country five times my strength, thereby leaving Richmond entirely unprotected, except by the clerks and citizens. Sheridan withdrew, Gracie's an
g the first week in May. I was near Drury's Bluff with a battery of light guns and Barton's and Gracie's brigades, and our company of irregular cavalry. The President came to my camp, and finding oult the outer works north of Richmond, at dawn the next day. Immediately my two movable brigades, Gracie's and Fry's, and a light battery were hastened to and through Richmond, and I arrived with them t Chafin's Bluff, it being impracticable to withdraw it from that position. As the day advanced Gracie's brigade was thrown in front of the works and pressed forward to feel Sheridan, but it was soonby leaving Richmond entirely unprotected, except by the clerks and citizens. Sheridan withdrew, Gracie's and Fry's brigades returned to near Drury's Bluff. During the week most all of Beauregard'rder from Beauregard to advance by brigades in echelon, left in front. This movement was begun, Gracie's brigade leading and I with it. After advancing some distance I heard firing to right and rear,
Breckenridge (search for this): chapter 53
luded to above. Confederate States, Headquarters Department North and South Carolina and Virginia, Hancock House, May 18, 1864, 9.30 P. M. Memorandum: The crisis demands prompt and decisive action. For this, the two armies are now too far apart, unless we consent to give up Petersburg, and place the capital in jeopardy. If General Lee will fall back behind the Chickahominy, engaging the enemy so as to draw him on, General Beauregard can bring up fifteen thousand men to unite with Breckenridge and fall upon the enemy's flank with over twenty thousand effectives-thus rendering Grant's defeat certain and decisive; and in time to enable General Beauregard to return, with a reinforcement from General Lee, to drive Butler from before Petersburg, and from his present position. For three days, perhaps four, Petersburg and Richmond can be held by the forces left behind; not longer. Without such concentration nothing decisive can be effected, and the picture presented is one of sta
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