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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 111 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 98 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 95 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 93 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 90 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 4 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 86 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 78 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 66 4 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 64 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John B. Hood or search for John B. Hood in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel E. P. Alexander's report of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
llery operations on the field of Gettysburg conducted under my command: On arriving on the field on the 2d of July, about 10 A. M., I was ordered by Lieutenant-General Longstreet to accompany the movements to the right, then being commenced by Hood's and McLaw's divisions, and to take command of the three battalions of artillery accompanying them, viz: my own battalion, of twentysix guns (commanded in my absence by Major Frank Huger), Colonel Cabell's, of eighteen guns, and Major Henry's, ofand preparations for an assault upon him made, I placed in position against him the eighteen guns of Cabell's battalion and eighteen of my own battalion, to fire upon the Peach Orchard position, while Henry's battalion accompanied and fought with Hood's division in its attack upon Round-Top. The first-mentioned battalions opened fire from two pieces of wood, Cabell's on the right about six hundred yards, and my own on the left about four hundred yards from the enemy's position. At such close
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
f there had before remained any doubt as to who was responsible for the failure to strike the blow at the proper time, the very clear and explicit statement by General Hood, which is a most valuable contribution to the history of the battle, would settle that doubt beyond dispute, I think. General Hood's statement furnishes inGeneral Hood's statement furnishes information not before given, in regard to the time of the arrival on the ground of Longstreet's troops, and renders it very certain that the orders for the attack to begin were given very early in the morning, if not the night before. It is to be remarked, that no member of General Lee's staff can tell when those orders were givenwhat was their precise character. It is very manifest that they were given in person, and orally, as was often General Lee's practice. The objection which General Hood made in regard to attacking up the Emmettsburg road, would not have existed in the morning or forenoon, because the Round Tops were not then occupied, and it w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Supplement to General Early's Review.-reply to General Longstreet. (search)
o persistently averse to the attack, and so loth to take the steps necessary to begin it, he again sent Col. Venable to Ewell to see whether, after viewing the position by daylight, he could not make the attack from his flank. Let us see what General Hood says in his letter to Longstreet. He says: I arrived with my staff in front of the heights of Gettysburg shortly after daybreak, as I have already stated, on the morning of the 2d of July. My division soon commenced filing into an openfrom General Lee himself, and I am disposed to side with him on the question of veracity, just as I am disposed to side with Colonel Taylor on the direct issue of veracity raised by General Longstreet with him in regard to the order for the use of Hood's and McLaws' divisions in the attack made on the 3d. General Lee's statement of his orders in regard to this latter attack would imply that the orders originally given in regard to it were to make it with Longstreet's whole corps, and is ther
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