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North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
and about this time I was ordered off to Wilmington as executive officer to attend to the equipment of the iron-clad North Carolina. She drew so much water it would have been impossible to get her over the bar, and consequently was only fit for hark their comfortable positions protecting the army on Morris' Island, and occasionally bombarding Fort Sumter. The North Carolina being finished, was anchored near Fort Fisher. No formidable enemy was in sight, except the United States steamer Mi for the experiment, and only waited for a suitable night, when orders came requiring me to take all the men from the North Carolina by railroad to Charleston immediately. An attack on that city was expected. I lost no time in obeying the order, an from General Beauregard. And. now came an order from Richmond, that I should proceed immediately back to rejoin the North Carolina, at Wilmington. This was too much! I never obeyed that order, but left Commodore Tucker to make my excuses to the N
China (China) (search for this): chapter 32
vice in Charleston Harbor by W. T. Glassel, Commander Confederate States Navy. [The following interesting paper was sent us through the Secretary of the South Carolina Historical Society. In a note accompanying the paper the author says that while he has written from memory, and without official reports to refer to, he believes he has given the facts in the order of their occurrence.] I had served, I believe faithfully, as a lieutenant in the United States navy, and had returned from China on the United States steamer Hartford to Philadelphia, sometime in 1862, after the battles of Manassas and Ball's Bluff had been fought. I was informed that I must now take a new oath of allegiance or be sent immediately to Fort Warren. I refused to take this oath, on the ground that it was inconsistent with one I had already taken to support the Constitution of the United States. I was kept in Fort Warren about eight months, and then exchanged as a prisoner of war, on the banks of the Ja
Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
in 1862, after the battles of Manassas and Ball's Bluff had been fought. I was informed that I must now take a new oath of allegiance or be sent immediately to Fort Warren. I refused to take this oath, on the ground that it was inconsistent with one I had already taken to support the Constitution of the United States. I was kept in Fort Warren about eight months, and then exchanged as a prisoner of war, on the banks of the James river. Being actually placed in the ranks of the Confederate States, I should think that even Mr. President Hayes would now acknowledge that it was my right, if not my duty, to act the part of a belligerent. A lieutenant's co Mr. Toombs and Mr. Cannon, had been shot or drowned, until I heard of their safe arrival in Charleston. I was retained as a prisoner in Fort La Fayette and Fort Warren for more than a year, and learned while there that I had been promoted for what was called gallant and meritorious service. What all the consequences of this
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
been ordered to command the naval forces at Charleston, torpedoes were fitted to the bows of ironcl My esteemed friend, Mr. Theodore Stoney, of Charleston, took measures for the construction of the l, monitors and ironsides, crossed the bar at Charleston and took their comfortable positions protectMorris' Island, and occasionally bombarding Fort Sumter. The North Carolina being finished, wase men from the North Carolina by railroad to Charleston immediately. An attack on that city was expe it run out a little longer. We passed Fort Sumter and beyond the line of picket-boats withoutnce of flood-tide, I might be able to reach Fort Sumter, but a north wind was against me, and afterwned, until I heard of their safe arrival in Charleston. I was retained as a prisoner in Fort Lad him of the glory of laying low the city of Charleston. It was said by officers of the navy that t late. I made efforts to do what I could at Charleston, till it became necessary to abandon that ci[2 more...]
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
In the meantime, the United States fleet, monitors and ironsides, crossed the bar at Charleston and took their comfortable positions protecting the army on Morris' Island, and occasionally bombarding Fort Sumter. The North Carolina being finished, was anchored near Fort Fisher. No formidable enemy was in sight, except the Silently steaming along just inside the bar, I had a good opportunity to reconnoitre the whole fleet of the enemy at anchor between me and the camp-fires on Morris' Island. Perhaps I was mistaken, but it did occur to me that if we had then, instead of only one, just ten or twelve torpedoes, to make a simultaneous attack on all the iron-clads, and this quickly followed by the egress of our rams, not only might this grand fleet have been destroyed, but the 20,000 troops on Morris' Island been left at our mercy. Quietly manouvreing and observing the enemy, I was half an hour more waiting on time and tide. The music of drum and fife had just ceased, a
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
Reminiscences of torpedo service in Charleston Harbor by W. T. Glassel, Commander Confederate States Navy. [The following interesting paper was sent us through the Secretary of the South Carolina Historical Society. In a note accompanying the paper the author says that while he has written from memory, and without official reports to refer to, he believes he has given the facts in the order of their occurrence.] I had served, I believe faithfully, as a lieutenant in the United States navy, and had returned from China on the United States steamer Hartford to Philadelphia, sometime in 1862, after the battles of Manassas and Ball's Bluff had been fought. I was informed that I must now take a new oath of allegiance or be sent immediately to Fort Warren. I refused to take this oath, on the ground that it was inconsistent with one I had already taken to support the Constitution of the United States. I was kept in Fort Warren about eight months, and then exchanged as a prisoner
y it shook the nerve of a brave admiral and deprived him of the glory of laying low the city of Charleston. It was said by officers of the navy that the iron-clad vessels of that fleet were immediately enveloped like women in hoop-skirt petticoats of netting, to lay in idle admiration of themselves for many months. The Ironsides went into dry-dock for repairs. The attack also suggested to officers of the United States Navy that this was a game which both sides could play at, and Lieutenant Cushing bravely availed himself of it. I congratulate him for the eclat and promotion he obtained thereby. I do not remember the date of my exchange again as a prisoner of war, but it was only in time to witness the painful agonies and downfall of an exhausted people, and the surrender of a hopeless cause. I was authorized to equip and command any number of torpedo boats, but it was now too late. I made efforts to do what I could at Charleston, till it became necessary to abandon that ci
Theodore Stoney (search for this): chapter 32
as the only reliable motive power. Commodore Tucker having been ordered to command the naval forces at Charleston, torpedoes were fitted to the bows of ironclad rams for use should the monitors enter the harbor. My esteemed friend, Mr. Theodore Stoney, of Charleston, took measures for the construction of the little cigar-boat David at private expense; and about this time I was ordered off to Wilmington as executive officer to attend to the equipment of the iron-clad North Carolina. Shehat city was expected. I lost no time in obeying the order, and was informed, on arriving there, that my men were required to reinforce the crews of the gun-boats, but there was nothing in particular for me to do. In a few days, however, Mr. Theodore Stoney informed me that the little cigar boat built at his expense had been brought down by railroad, and that if I could do anything with her he would place her at my disposal. On examination I determined to make a trial. She was yet in an un
J. R. Tucker (search for this): chapter 32
ht next morning, with only the loss of one torpedo, and convinced that steam was the only reliable motive power. Commodore Tucker having been ordered to command the naval forces at Charleston, torpedoes were fitted to the bows of ironclad rams fong tried the speed of my boat, and found it satisfactory, (six or seven knots an hour,) I got a necessary order from Commodore Tucker to attack the enemy at discretion, and also one from General Beauregard. And. now came an order from Richmond, thatmediately back to rejoin the North Carolina, at Wilmington. This was too much! I never obeyed that order, but left Commodore Tucker to make my excuses to the Navy Department. The 5th of October, 1863, a little after dark, we left Charleston wha command and high rank under a foreign flag. I declined the compliment and recommended my gallant old commander, Commodore J. R. Tucker, as one more worthy and competent than myself to fill a high position. In conclusion let me say: I have never
en iron-clads to our one, and of a superior class, almost invulnerable to shot or shell, I had but little faith in the measures we were taking for defence. Mr. Frank Lee, of the Engineers, was employed constructing torpedoes to be placed in the harbor, and called my attention to the subject. It appeared to me that this might be made an effective weapon to use offensively against the powerful vessels now being built. An old hulk was secured and Major Lee made the first experiment, as follows: A torpedo made of copper, and containing thirty or forty pounds of gunpowder, having a sensitive fuze, was attached by means of a socket to a long pine pole. To tn unfinished state. Assistant-Engineer J. H. Toombs volunteered his services, and all the necessary machinery was soon fitted and got in working order, while Major Frank Lee gave me his zealous aid in fitting on a torpedo. James Stuart (alias Sullivan) volunteered to go as fireman, and afterwards the services of J. W. Cannon as p
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