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Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
at victory. How, by General Lee's or General Longstreet's plan? Tell me, you who knew Jackson best, if he had been in command of troops, say four miles in rear of the battle-field on the night of the 1st of July, 1863, and General Lee had suggested to him to attack from his right on the morning of the 2d, what hour would he have attacked Meade's key-point on Round Top? Would the hour have approached nearer to 4 A. M. or 4 P. M.? For General Lee has said, I had such implicit confidence in Jackson's skill and energy that I never troubled myself to give him detailed instructions — the most general instructions were all that he needed. But as bearing upon this point stronger, if possible, than Lee's wish for Jackson at Gettysburg, is the following language in a letter to me from a gentleman extensively known and universally noted for the purity of his life and the conscientiousness of his character, and who now worthily fills the responsible position of Governor of his State. This le
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
e mind of the Confederate soldier. This surpassing interest is due from the fact that there prevails, throughout the South, a wide-spread impression that had the plans of the Southern chieftain been fully endorsed, entered into, and carried out by his corps commanders, the historic rebel yell of triumph would have resounded along Cemetery Ridge upon that celebrated 2d July, 1863, and re-echoing from the heights of Round Top, might have been heard and heeded around the walls of Washingtoi, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. There is a ghastliness about that picture of the struggle at Gettysburg, that the blood of the heroes who perished there serves but to increase; and over that splendid scene of human courage and human sacrifice, there arises like the ghost of Banquo at Macbeth's banquet, a dreadful apparition, which says that the battle was lost to the Southern troops because some one blundered. Military critics, foreign and native, have differed as to the individual responsibility of
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
gle for existence. He fell severely wounded at Gettysburg, and has since yielded his life for his country. Besides the two serviceable guns mentioned as lost from failure of teams near the Potomac, the enemy got three of our disabled pieces, of which two were left on the field as worthless, and one sent to the rear, was captured by his cavalry, with a few wagons from the trail. We wrested from him on the battle-field at Gettysburg, three 10-pound Parrott's, one 3-inch rifle, and three Napoleon's, all ready for use against himself. In the operations thus imperfectly reported, officers and men, almost without exception, evinced in high degree the important virtues of courage, fortitude, and patience; shrinking from no danger at the call of duty, they accepted with equal fidelity the hardships incident to just forbearance and stern service in an enemy's country; alternately heat and protracted storm aggravated other trials. The arid hills of Gattysburg afford no springs, and wel
McAllister (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
hird, and Twelfth corps, our returns of June 30th give their strength, present for duty, as follows: Second corps,12,088 men. Third corps,11,799 men. Twelfth corps,8,056 men. The Fifth corps came up during the night of the 1st, and morning of 2nd, from Hanover-see following extract from testimony of General S. W. Crawford, who commanded a division in that corps, on that point: I was in the rear division of the corps (Fifth), and on the evening of the 1st July I marched through Hanover and along the road through McSherrytown, marching until between two and three o'clock in the morning, and bivouacked at a town called Brushtown; and before dawn on Thursday, the 2nd of July, a staff-officer of General Sykes, then commanding the corps, rode to my headquarters and directed me to march my men, without giving them any coffee, at once to the field. I placed the column in motion and arrived before noon in the rear of the other divisions of the corps. The Sixth corps was a
Cemetery Ridge (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
e Southern chieftain been fully endorsed, entered into, and carried out by his corps commanders, the historic rebel yell of triumph would have resounded along Cemetery Ridge upon that celebrated 2d July, 1863, and re-echoing from the heights of Round Top, might have been heard and heeded around the walls of Washingtoi, Baltimore, ntioned. Doubleday's division of the First corps was massed in rear of Cemetery Hill, while Robertson's division of the same corps extended to the left along Cemetery Ridge, embracing that portion of it assaulted by Longstreet on the 3rd. From the left of Robertson the line was occupied for about three quarters of a mile beyond in the position before named until night, bnt Robertson's division was relieved by the Second corps, which had arrived at 7 A. M., and gone into position on Cemetery Ridge. The two remaining brigades of the Third corps left at Emmettsburg got up about 9 A. M., relieving Buford's cavalry, which was ordered back to Westminster to
Millwood (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
Anderson, and Majors McIntosh's and Pegram's battalions as a corps reserve. In this advance, general headquarters being with the First corps, my own were thereby also chiefly regulated. On June 16th, after a week at Culpeper of such artillery preparation and supervision as were requisite and practicable, I marched towards the Valley, attending near the Commanding-General to be ready for such service as might be required. On the 25th, the army having sufficiently rested in camp near Millwood and Berryville, crossed the Potomac, the Third corps at Shepherdstown, the First at Williamsport — the Comir.anding-General being with the latter, and my duties lying near him. On Wednesday, 1st July, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, having been reached by easy marches, and passed after a rest of one or two days, and the army being in motion towards Gettysburg, occasional cannon shots in that direction were heard by myself and others with the main body, as, before noon, we crossed the mountai
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
Second corps, Lieutenant-General Ewell commanding, which had a day or two before marched from Culpeper, approached Winchester, and Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews' artillery battalion operated with effect in driving back the enemy's advance on the Front Royal road. In the attack upon the enemy's fortifications next day, resulting in his hasty retreat and the capture of his guns and stores, most valuable service was rendered by the artillery under the immediate command of Lieutenant-Colonel Jonesttalions by the necessity of meeting certain demonstrations of the enemy. Actual contest, beyond cavalry skirmishing, he declined. The Third corps, on the 15th June, left Fredericksburg en route for Culpeper and the Shennandoah Valley, via Front Royal, accompanied by its artillery battalions, viz.: Lieut.-Colonel Ga'rnett's, Major Poague's, and Lieutenant-Colonel Cutt's, attending the divisions of Generals Heth, Pender, and Anderson, and Majors McIntosh's and Pegram's battalions as a corps
Cashtown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
of the column, but at the very tail of it, having marched in that honorable but unappreciated position from Culpeper to Gettysburg without once having the usual privilege of alternating in the lead on the march. Soon after our arrival Colonel Walton himself brought me an order to report in person to General Longstreet. On doing so, I was ordered to take command of all the artillery on the field for action, but to leave Colonel Walton's own battalion where it was then in bivouac near the Cashtown road. I did take the command and exercised it actively, and personally put in position every battalion, and nearly every battery, except a a part of Henry's battalion, on our extreme right flank, which the pressure in the centre did not allow me time to visit. I did not see or hear from Colonel Walton again that day. During the night his own battalion, under Major Eshleman, reported to me, and I myself placed it in position before daylight, and after daylight corrected its position and po
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
ulpeper of such artillery preparation and supervision as were requisite and practicable, I marched towards the Valley, attending near the Commanding-General to be ready for such service as might be required. On the 25th, the army having sufficiently rested in camp near Millwood and Berryville, crossed the Potomac, the Third corps at Shepherdstown, the First at Williamsport — the Comir.anding-General being with the latter, and my duties lying near him. On Wednesday, 1st July, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, having been reached by easy marches, and passed after a rest of one or two days, and the army being in motion towards Gettysburg, occasional cannon shots in that direction were heard by myself and others with the main body, as, before noon, we crossed the mountain. Two divisions of the Third corps, Heth's and Pender's, the former with Pegram's artillery battalion, the latter with McIntosh's, were in advance on this road; while of the Second corps, Early's division, attended by Jo
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
on in a contest of this kind, distinguished himself by cool and persistent daring; and several non-commissioned officers are mentioned by their commanders as evincing like gallantry. Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews and Lieutenant Contee were in this affair painfully, though not very dangerously wounded. While these events were transpiring at and near Winchester, General Rodes' division, accompanied by Lieutenant-Colonel Carter's artillery battalion, having marched by Berryville, approached Martinsburg, where was an additional force of the enemy. Under the well-directed fire of Colonel Carter's batteries that force speedily abandoned the town, leaving, in addition to twenty-three captured in Winchester, five superior field-guns. In these several engagements our batteries lost six men killed and fifteen wounded. The Second corps, in its subsequent advance across the Potomac into Maryland and Pennsylvania, was attended by its five battalions: Lieutenant-Colonel Carter's, Lieutenant-C
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