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Twymans Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7.49
le in front of Savage's Station on the York River Railroad, which had been the depot for unloading and storing supplies for the troops that held the old line, and where had been gathered in tents 2500 sick and wounded, most of the latter from Gaines's Mill. General Slocum's and General Smith's divisions both moved to their new positions before daylight of Sunday, the 29th of June--the day of the fighting at Savage's Station. As General Slocum's division had suffered so severely in the battlhickahominy (he only arrived at Savage's Station at 3 o'clock on the morning of June 30th) had prevented us from being defeated in the fight of June 29th. The 28th and 29th had been occupied by Jackson in disposing of the dead and wounded at Gaines's Mill and in repairing Grapevine Bridge. On the north (the enemy's) side of White Oak Swamp, the road for more than a quarter of a mile approaches the White Oak Bridge through low ground, open to artillery fire from the south side. [See map, p.
Quaker (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7.49
ed at the James River. At about 10:30 in the morning, as near as I can now recollect, I accompanied General McClellan to the intersection of the Charles City and Quaker roads, about two miles from the White Oak Bridge. I found General Slocum's division posted somewhat in rear of the intersection of those roads, and in front of tdale or Frayser's farm. The small force at Brackett's Ford defeated an attack at that point, some time during the day. At the junction of the Charles City and Quaker roads General McClellan had a conference with the corps commanders (Sumner, Heintzelman, and Franklin), and when it was ended he went toward the James River. A smake it imperative that he should have done. A short time after I separated from General McClellan (as mentioned above) at the junction of the Charles City and Quaker roads, I bade farewell to the Prince de Joinville, who told me that he and his nephews were about to leave us and return to Europe. He had always been very frien
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7.49
During the whole time between June 26th and July 2d, there was not a night in which the men did not march almost continually, nor a day on which there was not a fight. I never saw a skulker during the whole time, nor heard one insubordinate word. Some men fell by the wayside, exhausted, and were captured; but their misfortune was due to physical inability to go on. They had no food but that which was carried in their haversacks, and the hot weather soon rendered that uneatable. Sleep was out of the question, and the only rest obtained was while lying down awaiting an attack, or sheltering themselves from shot and shell. No murmur was heard; everything was accepted as the work for which they had enlisted. They had been soldiers less than a year, yet their conduct could not have been more soldierly had they seen ten years of service. No such material for soldiers was ever in the field before, and their behavior in this movement foreshadowed their success as veterans at Appomattox.
Glendale, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7.49
were returned to General Sumner about 5 o'clock, in time to do good service at Glendale. Toward sundown, at the request of General Sumner, Caldwell's and Meager's br a road toward James River about two miles in rear of that which the troops at Glendale were to take, and found it practicable. About 10 in the evening, assuming tha was repulsed at all points, except in the single case of McCall's division at Glendale, which was overpowered by numbers, after it had captured three of the enemy's exceedingly. Had he made two attacks simultaneously, the result of the day at Glendale and White Oak Bridge might have been different. There may be reasons for his the ford would have easily overrun our small force there, placing our right at Glendale, held by Slocum's division, in great jeopardy, and turning our force at the bridge by getting between it and Glendale. In fact, it is likely that we should have been defeated on that day had General Jackson done what his great reputation seems
Beaver Dam Creek, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 7.49
n in it and commence a heavy artillery fire on the enemy's line opposite. [See map, p. 384.] Golding's is near the Chickahominy on the extreme right of the Union intrenched line. Five days rations, cold tea in the canteens, etc., etc., had been issued, so that everything Uniform of the 72d Pennsylvania, Baxter's fire Zouaves. was ready to follow up the projected bombardment, which it was presumed would commence on the morning of the 27th. But on the evening of the 26th the fight at Beaver Dam Creek occurred, and General McClellan called at my headquarters on his way to confer with General Porter as to his operations of the next day. I was then absent at General Slocum's headquarters, conferring with him in regard to the attack we were expecting to make, and therefore missed General McClellan, so that I received no word from him until the next morning. About daylight on the 27th I received orders to send General Slocum's division across the Chickahominy to report to General Port
Seven Pines (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 7.49
the 25th, known as Oak Grove, or King's School House. Oak Grove was the first of the Seven Days battles. The Union loss was 67 killed, 504 wounded, 55 missing. The Confederate reports show a total loss of 441. (For the strategy of this movement see General McClellan's article, page 179.) The ground secured by this action varied in front of the different brigades, and was from a quarter of a mile to one mile in advance of the line that had been held by the Third Corps since the battle of Seven Pines.--Editors. On the 26th an epaulement was thrown up by the troops of the Sixth Corps in a wheat-field in front of our lines on Golding's farm, which was ready for guns on the morning of the 27th. During the night of the 26th five batteries of the Artillery Reserve, under the command of Colonel (now General) G. W. Getty, were collected in rear of the epaulement, ready to take position in it and commence a heavy artillery fire on the enemy's line opposite. [See map, p. 384.] Golding's is n
Seven Pines (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7.49
road. I sent an aide in haste after my other two regiments, informing General Sumner of the situation. The 1st Minnesota, of German's brigade, being most handy, was first sent, my two reserve regiments following. While placing the 1st Minnesota on the left to extend across the Williamsburg road, the battle began. My right flank swept the railroad monitor, which had advanced to the edge of the woods, and it ran back. The battle moved to my left, and I discovered that our works east of Seven Pines had been evacuated by Heintzelman. I threw back the left flank of the 1st Minnesota across the Williamsburg road and sent the 69th Pennsylvania of my brigade to prolong the left, to prevent the turning movement of the enemy; at the same time informing General Sumner of the conditions in front. He would not believe that Heintzelman had withdrawn until I sent my last mounted man, urging and demanding reenforcements. The 71st Pennsylvania (also called the 1st California), of my brigade, a
Robert Toombs (search for this): chapter 7.49
rite or to collect my thoughts. The battle at Glendale on the 30th of June, the next day after that of Savage's Station, was saved by my brigade, which kept the enemy from piercing the center of the Army of the Potomac; but, like the instance above, history has given the credit to General Misunderstanding, who, in history, fights most battles. Parts of Hazzard's, Pettit's, and Osborn's batterries were engaged on the Union side. The Confederate infantry north of the railroad (Cobb's, Toombs's, and Anderson's brigades) did not take an active part in the battle. Anderson's brigade is not shown, its position being outside the northern bounds of the map. The Confederate artillery engaged comprised Kemper's battery, two guns of Hart's battery, and Lieutenant Barry's 32-pounder rifled gun mounted on a rail-car, and protected from cannon-shot by a sloping roof, in front, covered with plates of iron, through which a port-hole had been pierced. Editors. was over, our troops held
gade would suffice, I led them forward to the fences, at the edge of the woods on the west side of the clearing, about five hundred yards distant from the ravine on the east side of the clearing. General Sumner had his headquarters east of this wooded ravine and could not observe what was occurring on the west side of the open field. When I reached the fences I sent skirmishers through the belt of trees, and found the enemy advancing on the Williamsburg road and on the railroad, where General Lee's famous railroad monitor was slowly approaching. I had to throw back the right company of the right regiment, the 72d Pennsylvania, to rake the monitor. Then I found my two regiments not enough to extend across between the Williamsburg road and the railroad. I sent an aide in haste after my other two regiments, informing General Sumner of the situation. The 1st Minnesota, of German's brigade, being most handy, was first sent, my two reserve regiments following. While placing the 1st
William F. Barry (search for this): chapter 7.49
credit to General Misunderstanding, who, in history, fights most battles. Parts of Hazzard's, Pettit's, and Osborn's batterries were engaged on the Union side. The Confederate infantry north of the railroad (Cobb's, Toombs's, and Anderson's brigades) did not take an active part in the battle. Anderson's brigade is not shown, its position being outside the northern bounds of the map. The Confederate artillery engaged comprised Kemper's battery, two guns of Hart's battery, and Lieutenant Barry's 32-pounder rifled gun mounted on a rail-car, and protected from cannon-shot by a sloping roof, in front, covered with plates of iron, through which a port-hole had been pierced. Editors. was over, our troops held the contested ground. Their behavior throughout the fight had been admirable. General E. M. Law says in the Southern bivouac for May, 1887: The battle of Savage's Station, although a drawn fight as far as the possession of the field was concerned, was practically a vic
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