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Official Records (search for this): chapter 2.18
up their own wounds, and the coffee we had given them had cheered them into life and hope. Their cheerfulness grew into hilarity and merriment as they found themselves clear, at last, from the dead, and facing toward home, with a hope not by any means so impossible of realization as it had seemed not long before. Poor fellows! their joy was more touching than their sufferings,--which, indeed, they seemed to have forgotten. In our own brigade we found we had lost nearly 150, The Official Records (Vol. XXI., Pt. I., p. 136) give the loss as 12 killed, 114 wounded, 14 missing; total, 140.--editors. out of a present-for-duty strength of about 1000 men. This would have been a fair average loss in any ordinary battle, but we had suffered it as we lay on the ground inactive, without the excitement and dash of battle and without the chance to reply: a strain upon nerves and physical endurance which we afterward remembered as severer than many more fatal fields. In the midst of our b
Daniel F. Griffin (search for this): chapter 2.18
t memories of the war — the men in gray behind this wall, talking, laughing, cooking, cleaning muskets, clicking locks,--there they were!--Lee's soldiers!--the Army of Northern Virginia! We were so absurdly near this host of yesterday's victors that we seemed wholly in their hands and a part of their great mass; cut off and remote from the Federal army The force here consisted of Buchanan's and Andrews's brigades of regulars, of Sykes's division, and Stockton's brigade of volunteers, of Griffin's division, Fifth Army Corps.--editors. and almost within the lines of the enemy — prisoners, of course. That was the immediate impression, as we stupidly gazed in the first moment of the awkward discovery. But the sharp whistle of a bullet sounded in our ears, and a rebel's face peered through the puff of smoke, as he removed the rifle from his shoulder; then rapidly half-a-dozen more bullets whistled by us, and the warning sent us all to earth. The order to lie down is theoretically
Fisher Ames (search for this): chapter 2.18
In front of the Stone wall at Fredericksburg. condensed from the overland monthly, 1869, Vol. III., p. 432, by permission of Fisher Ames. General John W. Ames, U. S. Surveyor-General of California, died in San Rafael, in that State, in 1877. by John W. Ames, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. V. On Saturday, December 13th, our brigade The 2d Brigade of regulars (Sykes's division, Fifth Army Corps), commanded by Major George L. Andrews, 17th U. S. Infantry. General Ames was then a captain in the 11th U. S. Infantry.--editors. had been held in reserve, but late in the day we were hurried to the battle only to see a field full of flying men and the sun low in the west shining red through columns of smoke,--six deserted field-pieces on a slight rise of ground in front of us, and a cheering column of troops in regular march disappearing on our left. But the day was then over and the battle lost, and our line felt hardly bullets enough to draw blood before darkness put an end to
Felix G. Buchanan (search for this): chapter 2.18
nd behind the wall were men in gray uniforms moving carelessly about. This picture is one of my most distinct memories of the war — the men in gray behind this wall, talking, laughing, cooking, cleaning muskets, clicking locks,--there they were!--Lee's soldiers!--the Army of Northern Virginia! We were so absurdly near this host of yesterday's victors that we seemed wholly in their hands and a part of their great mass; cut off and remote from the Federal army The force here consisted of Buchanan's and Andrews's brigades of regulars, of Sykes's division, and Stockton's brigade of volunteers, of Griffin's division, Fifth Army Corps.--editors. and almost within the lines of the enemy — prisoners, of course. That was the immediate impression, as we stupidly gazed in the first moment of the awkward discovery. But the sharp whistle of a bullet sounded in our ears, and a rebel's face peered through the puff of smoke, as he removed the rifle from his shoulder; then rapidly half-a-dozen
George L. Andrews (search for this): chapter 2.18
al of California, died in San Rafael, in that State, in 1877. by John W. Ames, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. V. On Saturday, December 13th, our brigade The 2d Brigade of regulars (Sykes's division, Fifth Army Corps), commanded by Major George L. Andrews, 17th U. S. Infantry. General Ames was then a captain in the 11th U. S. Infantry.--editors. had been held in reserve, but late in the day we were hurried to the battle only to see a field full of flying men and the sun low in the west shthe Army of Northern Virginia! We were so absurdly near this host of yesterday's victors that we seemed wholly in their hands and a part of their great mass; cut off and remote from the Federal army The force here consisted of Buchanan's and Andrews's brigades of regulars, of Sykes's division, and Stockton's brigade of volunteers, of Griffin's division, Fifth Army Corps.--editors. and almost within the lines of the enemy — prisoners, of course. That was the immediate impression, as we stup
hemselves clear, at last, from the dead, and facing toward home, with a hope not by any means so impossible of realization as it had seemed not long before. Poor fellows! their joy was more touching than their sufferings,--which, indeed, they seemed to have forgotten. In our own brigade we found we had lost nearly 150, The Official Records (Vol. XXI., Pt. I., p. 136) give the loss as 12 killed, 114 wounded, 14 missing; total, 140.--editors. out of a present-for-duty strength of about 1000 men. This would have been a fair average loss in any ordinary battle, but we had suffered it as we lay on the ground inactive, without the excitement and dash of battle and without the chance to reply: a strain upon nerves and physical endurance which we afterward remembered as severer than many more fatal fields. In the midst of our buzz of relief and mutual congratulation, the-expected summons came for us to fall back to the town. Once more we formed an upright line of battle, then faced
In front of the Stone wall at Fredericksburg. condensed from the overland monthly, 1869, Vol. III., p. 432, by permission of Fisher Ames. General John W. Ames, U. S. Surveyor-General of California, died in San Rafael, in that State, in 1877. by John W. Ames, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. V. On Saturday, December 13th, our brigade The 2d Brigade of regulars (Sykes's division, Fifth Army Corps), commanded by Major George L. Andrews, 17th U. S. Infantry. General Ames was then a captain in the 11th U. S. Infantry.--editors. had been held in reserve, but late in the day we were hurried to the battle only to see a field full of flying men and the sun low in the west shining red through columns of smoke,--six deserted field-pieces on a slight rise of ground in front of us, and a cheering column of troops in regular march disappearing on our left. But the day was then over and the battle lost, and our line felt hardly bullets enough to draw blood before darkness put an end to t
December 13th (search for this): chapter 2.18
In front of the Stone wall at Fredericksburg. condensed from the overland monthly, 1869, Vol. III., p. 432, by permission of Fisher Ames. General John W. Ames, U. S. Surveyor-General of California, died in San Rafael, in that State, in 1877. by John W. Ames, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. V. On Saturday, December 13th, our brigade The 2d Brigade of regulars (Sykes's division, Fifth Army Corps), commanded by Major George L. Andrews, 17th U. S. Infantry. General Ames was then a captain in the 11th U. S. Infantry.--editors. had been held in reserve, but late in the day we were hurried to the battle only to see a field full of flying men and the sun low in the west shining red through columns of smoke,--six deserted field-pieces on a slight rise of ground in front of us, and a cheering column of troops in regular march disappearing on our left. But the day was then over and the battle lost, and our line felt hardly bullets enough to draw blood before darkness put an end to
t little implement has done for mankind? Certainly none better than those who have sought its solace after the bivouac breakfast that succeeds a bivouac bed, in December. We now began to take note, through the misty veil, of the wreck of men and horses cumbering the ground about us, and a slight lifting of the gray fog showed rs? Was maternal anxiety added to the physical terrors of her forced isolation? Slowly the sun declined. He had been our friend all day, shining through the December air with an autumn glow that almost warmed the chill earth; but at his last half-hour he seemed to hang motionless in the western sky. His going down would set und had combined the dangers of a battle-field and the discomfort of a winter's bivouac with many new horrors of its own. At last the lingering sun went down. December twilights are short; the Federal line sprang to its feet with almost a shout of relief. The reel fire grew brisker as they saw such a swarm of blue-coats rising
In front of the Stone wall at Fredericksburg. condensed from the overland monthly, 1869, Vol. III., p. 432, by permission of Fisher Ames. General John W. Ames, U. S. Surveyor-General of California, died in San Rafael, in that State, in 1877. by John W. Ames, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. V. On Saturday, December 13th, our brigade The 2d Brigade of regulars (Sykes's division, Fifth Army Corps), commanded by Major George L. Andrews, 17th U. S. Infantry. General Ames was then a captain in the 11th U. S. Infantry.--editors. had been held in reserve, but late in the day we were hurried to the battle only to see a field full of flying men and the sun low in the west shining red through columns of smoke,--six deserted field-pieces on a slight rise of ground in front of us, and a cheering column of troops in regular march disappearing on our left. But the day was then over and the battle lost, and our line felt hardly bullets enough to draw blood before darkness put an end to t
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