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Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
d seventy-eight pieces of serviceable ordnance, all smooth-bores, ranging from 24-pounders to 10-inch Columbiads. (2) Fort Moultrie, a brick work located on Sullivan's Island about one mile from Fort Sumter, mounting one tier of guns en barbette. Bends; by reenforcing the walls of Fort Sumter adjacent to the magazine; by increasing the armament of that work and of Fort Moultrie with heavier calibers, including large rifles; by rebuilding and rearming old Fort Johnson, on James Island, on the steries, as well as from Fort Sumter, and during the attack divided its own fire between Fort Wagner, Fort Sumter, and Fort Moultrie. After this repulse Admiral Du Pont expressed the opinion that Charleston could not be taken by a purely naval attacion, could be eliminated from the conflict, so that the fleet could pass up on the south side of the channel, leaving Fort Moultrie and the other Sullivan's Island works nearly a mile to the right. The army was therefore asked if it could cooperate
Stono River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
preparations against a land attack were also made. On James Island strong works were built to close the approach from Stono River. Stono inlet and harbor were occupied by an inclosed fort on Cole's Island, which held under control all the anchorage The James Island defenses were especially strong. They had repulsed a bold and spirited assault upon them from the Stono River side, made by forces under General H. W. Benham, on the 16th of June, 1862, and had been greatly strengthened since thring a lodgment on Morris Island comprised, as one of its features, a demonstration in force on James Island by way of Stono River, over the same ground where Brigadier-General Benham had met with repulse the year before. The object in the present Yet this was the work we had set out to do, and it was believed we had the men to do it. The demonstration up the Stono River was begun in the afternoon of July 8th, by Brigadier-General Terry, who landed on James Island with about 3800 men. Th
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
beyond question a consideration of the highest moment; it is indeed an essential consideration. Even in our casemated works special precautions are taken to prevent the entrance of missiles. In those last built the embrasures were supplied with iron shutters to stop grape, canister, and rifle bullets, so that the men might not be driven from their guns. The lessons of all modern wars, so far from justifying a dependence on open batteries for channel defense, all point the other way. At Port Royal our fleet of wooden vessels drove the enemy precipitately from their guns on both sides of the harbor; and in the operations before Charleston it was no uncommon exploit for the New Ironsides alone to silence the fire of Battery Wagner. From the very beginning of the war, running a battery became almost an every-day affair, the most important question being whether the channel itself was free from obstructions. A proper defense, therefore, requires that the shore-batteries should be arme
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
h is practically narrowed to about one mile by a shoal that makes out from the south side, on the northern edge of which stands Fort Sumter. The position in its general features seemed to invite an assault by water, and to present a peculiarly attractive field for naval heroism and prowess; while its approaches by land from the sea islands which we occupied were practically closed by impassable swamps to any but a greatly superior force. The defenses which had been constructed by the United States for the harbor and city of Charleston were designed to resist a naval attack only. They comprised: (1) Fort Sumter, a strong brick work, as strength was reckoned in those days, mounting two tiers of guns in casemates and one tier en barbette. It stands on the southern edge of the channel, distant three and one-third miles from the nearest point of the city. It was planned for 135 guns, but never received its full armament. The embrasures or ports of the second tier, not having been fi
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
avery and cool and mature judgment, was assigned to the command of the South Atlantic blockading squadron, comprising the naval forces available for operations against Charleston; but he was not permitted to enter upon this new field of labor, his sudden and untimely death leaving the command with Rear-Admiral John A. Dahlgren. [See p. 46.] Charleston was located in the Military Department of the South, comprising the narrow strip of sea-coast held by the Union forces in South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Upon relieving General David Hunter and assuming command of this department in June, I found our troops actually occupying eleven positions on this stretch of coast, while a small blockading squadron held a variable and more or less imperfect control of the principal inlets. In the neighborhood of Charleston we held all the coast line south of Morris Island, while all the other islands around the harbor, and to the northward, were either controlled or occupied by the enemy.
Cumming's Point (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
h end of Morris Island, about 2600 yards from Fort Sumter; with Battery Wagner the works at Cumming's Point, the extreme north end of the island, would also fall; third, from the position thus securer sand-hills like the rest of the island. Battery Gregg, on the north end of the island at Cumming's Point, was known to be armed with guns bearing on the channel. Of one important topographical ch the waves and tides, and swept not only by the guns of Wagner itself, but also by those of Cumming's Point and Fort Sumter and several batteries on James Island. Indeed, the ground over which our ms. Eighteen pieces of ordnance were found in Battery Wagner, and seven in Battery Gregg on Cumming's Point, most of them being comparatively large, as calibers were estimated in those days. Battece of about five and three-quarter miles. Firing on the city was subsequently resumed from Cumming's Point. Fort Sumter was subjected to another severe cannonade of some days' duration, The bo
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
hroat of the harbor between Sullivan's and Morris islands is 2700 yards, which is practically narrowcondition until destroyed by our fire from Morris Island. When this fort fell into the enemy's hannd swept all the practicable water routes from Morris and Folly islands. North-east of the city a ling the attack divided its own fire between Fort Wagner, Fort Sumter, and Fort Moultrie. After thirely destroyed with rifle guns, planted on Morris Island, and that beyond the capture of that islant the army should undertake the capture of Morris Island and the reduction of Fort Sumter, unless ion of the enemy's forces from our front on Morris Island. It is understood that General Beauregaar-Admiral Dahlgren, steamed up abreast of Morris Island and took part in the action. After the caong, who had been the first man to land on Morris Island a few days before, actually leading his enurs. These operations left the whole of Morris Island in our possession, and Fort Sumter in ruin[14 more...]
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
d be converted into overwhelming disaster were measurably lost sight of in the chagrin of defeat. The disheartening fact was that the iron-clads had conspicuously failed in the very work for which they had been supposed to be peculiarly fit, and the country had nothing whatever to take their place. Late in May I was called to Washington, General Gillmore was on leave of absence at this time. From September 18th, 1862, to April, 1863, he had held important commands in Kentucky and West Virginia.--editors. and was informed at the consultations which followed that it was the intention to make another attack with the iron-clads, provided Fort Sumter, which was regarded as the most formidable obstacle and the key of the position, could be eliminated from the conflict, so that the fleet could pass up on the south side of the channel, leaving Fort Moultrie and the other Sullivan's Island works nearly a mile to the right. The army was therefore asked if it could cooperate to the exte
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
own fire between Fort Wagner, Fort Sumter, and Fort Moultrie. After this repulse Admiral Du Pont expressed the opinion that Charleston could not be taken by a purely naval attack, and some of his subordinate commanders held similar views. At Washington it was deemed of so much importance to present an actively aggressive front in this quarter in aid of projected operations elsewhere that orders were issued by the President himself to hold the position inside of Charleston bar, and to prevent of defeat. The disheartening fact was that the iron-clads had conspicuously failed in the very work for which they had been supposed to be peculiarly fit, and the country had nothing whatever to take their place. Late in May I was called to Washington, General Gillmore was on leave of absence at this time. From September 18th, 1862, to April, 1863, he had held important commands in Kentucky and West Virginia.--editors. and was informed at the consultations which followed that it was the
Stono Inlet (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.8
nt of the city; by building a new battery at Mount Pleasant, and by the construction of ironclad rams. Ample preparations against a land attack were also made. On James Island strong works were built to close the approach from Stono River. Stono inlet and harbor were occupied by an inclosed fort on Cole's Island, which held under control all the anchorage ground and landing-place inside the Stono bar. This advanced position was abandoned by the enemy prior to the naval attack on Fort Sumterhe view of the enemy on the opposite side of Light-House inlet. They were intended to operate against his batteries there, protect the column of boats in its advance across the stream, or cover its retreat in case of repulse. The entrance to Stono inlet was lighted up at night, and all transports bringing troops were ordered to enter after dark and leave before morning. All appearance of preparations for offensive operations was carefully suppressed, while upon General Israel Vogdes's defens
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