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Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.17
the dense forest growth, says, Many men from both armies, looking for water during the night, found themselves within the opposite lines.--A. S. W. This ended the operations of May 5th, leaving the Army of the Potomac in close contact with Ewell and Hill. During the night of the 5th orders were given for a general attack by Sedgwick, Warren, and Hancock at 5 o'clock the next morning. Burnside, who, with his corps, had been holding the line of the Orange and Alexandria railroad back to Bull Run, set his corps in motion the afternoon of the 4th and made a forced march to the field. The leading division, under Stevenson, moving from Brandy Station, crossed at Germanna Ford the night of the 5th, was held in reserve at Wilderness Tavern, and joined Hancock on the Brock road at 8 A. M. of the 6th. Potter and Willcox, coining from Bealton and Rappahannock Station, reached the field about daylight, and were ordered to fill the gap between Warren and Hancock and join in the general atta
Culpeper, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.17
e outset, his position in the Wilderness, and Grant did not know at that time, as did General Meade and General Hooker, to what advantage Lee could turn the Wilderness, with its woods, ravines, plank roads, and dirt roads. The Army of the Potomac began to cross the Rapidan at midnight of May 3d, after due preparation on the part of Sheridan's cavalry to cover our front. A canvas and a wooden pontoon bridge were laid at Germanna Ford, similar bridges at Ely's Ford, and a wooden bridge at Culpeper Relative positions of forces, morning and evening, May 4, 1864. Mine Ford. These three fords cover about seven miles of the Rapidan River,which in general flows south-east. Hancock, preceded by Gregg's cavalry, crossed at Ely's Ford and moved to Chancellorsville, which placed him on the left, or south-east, side of the Wilderness battle-field. Warren, with Wilson's cavalry in front (and followed by Sedgwick), crossed at Germanna Ford and followed the Germanna Plank road, due sout
Todd's Tavern (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.17
nt's right flank as soon as Grant was far enough advanced into the Wilderness on the road to Richmond. As for the Wilderness, it was uneven, with woods, thickets, and ravines right and left. Tangled thickets of pine, scrub-oak, and cedar prevented our seeing the enemy, and prevented any one in command of a large force from determining accurately the position of the troops he was ordering to and fro. The appalling rattle of the musketry, the yells of the enemy, and the cheers of our Todd's Tavern. From a sketch made in 1884. own men were constantly in our ears. At times, our lines while firing could not see the array of the enemy, not fifty yards distant. After the battle was fairly begun, both sides were protected by log or earth breastworks. For an understanding of the roads which shaped the movements in the Wilderness, cross the Rapidan from the north and imagine yourself standing on the Germanna Plank road, where the Brock road intersects it, a little south of Wilderness
Belle Plain (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.17
of the enemy must be greater, we having taken over four thousand prisoners in battle, whilst he has taken but few, except stragglers. I am now sending back to Belle Plain all my wagons for a fresh supply of provisions and ammunition, and propose to fight it out on this line if it takes all summer. The arrival of reenforcements here will be very encouraging to the men, and I hope they will be sent as fast as possible, and in as great numbers. My object in having them sent to Belle Plain was to use them as an escort to our supply train. If it is more convenient to send them out by train to march from the railroad to Belle Plain or Fredericksburg, send tBelle Plain or Fredericksburg, send them so. I am satisfied the enemy are very shaky, and are only kept up to the mark by the greatest exertions on the part of their officers, and by keeping them intrenched in every position they take. Up to this time there is no indication of any portion of Lee's army being detached for the defense of Richmond. Very respec
Rapidan (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.17
ould turn the Wilderness, with its woods, ravines, plank roads, and dirt roads. The Army of the Potomac began to cross the Rapidan at midnight of May 3d, after due preparation on the part of Sheridan's cavalry to cover our front. A canvas and a wooden pontoon bridge were laid at Germanna Ford, similar bridges at Ely's Ford, and a wooden bridge at Culpeper Relative positions of forces, morning and evening, May 4, 1864. Mine Ford. These three fords cover about seven miles of the Rapidan River,which in general flows south-east. Hancock, preceded by Gregg's cavalry, crossed at Ely's Ford and moved to Chancellorsville, which placed him on the left, or south-east, side of the Wilderness battle-field. Warren, with Wilson's cavalry in front (and followed by Sedgwick), crossed at Germanna Ford and followed the Germanna Plank road, due south-east, to Wilderness Tavern. Sedgwick encamped for the night three miles south of the ford. The sixty-five miles of trains were until 2 P.
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.17
ended the operations of May 5th, leaving the Army of the Potomac in close contact with Ewell and Hill. During the night of the 5th orders were given for a general attack by Sedgwick, Warren, and Hancock at 5 o'clock the next morning. Burnside, who, with his corps, had been holding the line of the Orange and Alexandria railroad back to Bull Run, set his corps in motion the afternoon of the 4th and made a forced march to the field. The leading division, under Stevenson, moving from Brandy Station, crossed at Germanna Ford the night of the 5th, was held in reserve at Wilderness Tavern, and joined Hancock on the Brock road at 8 A. M. of the 6th. Potter and Willcox, coining from Bealton and Rappahannock Station, reached the field about daylight, and were ordered to fill the gap between Warren and Hancock and join in the general attack. General Humphreys remarks in his account as follows: For, so far as could be ascertained, the gap between Hill and Ewell was not yet closed, neit
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.17
f the Second Corps obeyed orders implicitly. We waited to cover the movements of the rest of the army, and then took our place at 4 P. M. of the 8th of May on the Brock road, about one mile south-east of Todd's tavern.--A. S. W. At 11 A. M.,says General Humphreys, Hancock sent his leading brigade under Miles to make a reconnoissance down the Catharpin road toward Corbin's Bridge, about two miles distant. Miles had his own brigade, one battery, and one brigade of Gregg's cavalry. He found Hampton's cavalry, and held them at bay until 5:30 P. M. While returning, Miles was attacked by Mahone's infantry, and was compelled to call up reenforcements. At 1:30 P. M. Hancock sent Gibbon east ten miles to support Warren and Sedgwick. About 8 A. M. on the 8th Warren's leading division, under General John C. Robinson, deployed into the clearing north of Spotsylvania Court House, and was fired upon by Confederates upon Spotsylvania Ridge. General Robinson was severely wounded in the first f
Ny River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.17
d the Fifth Corps, supported by Sedgwick, were at 1 P. M. directed to storm the Confederate position on Spotsylvania Ridge. Sedgwick moved south to join Warren's left; but it was late in the day when Crawford's division of the Fifth and one of Wright's brigades under Penrose assaulted what proved to be Rodes's division of Ewell's corps in position and intrenched. On the morning of the 9th Burnside's corps moved across from the Plank road to the Fredericksburg road at the crossing of the Ny River. This brought him east of the court house one and a half miles. He pushed over the river one division under O. B. Willcox. Stevenson's division came up at noon. Potter's division remained a mile in rear on the Fredericksburg road. Willcox fought a brigade of R. H. Anderson and some dismounted cavalry. Hancock moved east to the right of Warren, and intrenched overlooking the Po. On the morning of the 9th Sheridan started on a raid around Lee's army. See note, p. 117, and article to fo
Po River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.17
117, and article to follow.--editors. In front of Hancock the Po River ran from west to east, then it turned due south opposite Warren's oissance toward Lee's left, crossing the east and west bend of the Po River, moving south as far as the Shady Grove road, turning the enemy's left; then to move east, and cross the Po River again by the Block House road bridge. Hancock crossed three of his divisions (Mott was with Wnter. Mott's division of Hancock's corps, still kept north of the Po River with Wright, and on the left of the Sixth Corps, was to prepare to However, Brooke's brigade of Barlow's division was sent down the Po River to a point half a mile below the bridge. Brooke discovered the ening nearly half a mile below the bridge, their left resting on the Po River. But other arrangements had been made for the movement of the a on fire in the rear of his line, crossed to the north side of the Po River. One gun, the first ever lost by the Second Corps, was jammed betw
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.17
t, thrusting his whole force between Lee and Richmond. We did move toward Spotsylvania. Warren's Fifth Corps was directed to withdraw from the Wilderness after dade at the time. Out of the Wilderness, Sunday morning, May 8-the March to Spotsylvania. From a sketch made at the time. p. 167.] This was attempted, but Warren fo delay gave Longstreet's men, under R. H. Anderson, the opportunity to reach Spotsylvania in advance of Warren. When Warren reached Todd's tavern at 3 A. M., he founempt a crossing. Outline map of Lee's positions in the Wilderness and at Spotsylvania. By Jed. Hotchkiss. Top. Eng. Second Corps, A. N. V. During this night oouth of the pontoon-bridges. Relative positions of the opposing Corps at Spotsylvania, May 8-21, 1864. These troops formed a tete-du-pont facing south. Heth' a wild Hurrah, heedless of the Major General John C. Robinson, wounded at Spotsylvania. From a photograph. terrible front and flank fire he received, his men pou
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