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t professions of love for the Union and the Constitution; and, with such avowals emblazoned on their standards, they went. into the fight, each doubtful of success, and all conscious that a national crisis was at hand. There was a vague presentiment before the minds of reflecting men everywhere, that the time when the practical answer to the great question — What shall be the policy of the Nation concerning Slavery?--could no longer be postponed. The conflict was desperate from July to November, and grew more intense as it approached its culmination at the polls. The Republicans and Douglas Democrats were denounced by their opponents as Abolitionists-treasonably sectional, and practically hostile to the perpetuation of the Union. The Breckinridge party, identified as it unfortunately was with avowed disunionists — men who for long years had been in the habit of threatening to attempt the dissolution of the Union by the process of secession, whenever the revelations of the Census
to wait for further developments; so, on the evening of the 3d of May, 1860. they adjourned to meet in the city of Richmond, in Virginia, on the second Monday of June following, for further action. To that Convention they invited the Democracy of the country who might sympathize with their movement and their platform to send re harmony, and prosperity of all, I am most happy to co-operate for the practical success of the principles declared by the Convention. In the beautiful month of June, when Nature, in the temperate zone, is most wealthy in flowers and foliage and the songs of birds, and there is every thing in her aspect to inspire delight, and absolute. God be thanked for the brave men who had the courage to meet them and bid them defiance, first at Charleston, in April, 1860, and then at Baltimore, in June! To them is due the credit of declaring war against this intolerable despotism. The truthfulness of this picture will be fully apparent in future pages. Tail
Thomas Jefferson (search for this): chapter 1
raught with mischievous intent. It was a spirit potential as Arie in the creation of elemental strife. For several months, premonitions of a storm, that threatened danger to the integrity of the organization there represented, had been abundant. Violently discordant elements were now in close contact. The clouds rapidly thickened, and before the sun went down on that first day of the session, all felt that a fierce tempest was impending, which might topple from its foundations, laid by Jefferson, the venerable political fabric known as the Democratic Party, which he and his friends had reared sixty years before. On the morning of the second day of the session, Caleb Cushing, of Massachusetts, was chosen permanent President of the Convention, and a vice-president and secretary for each State were appointed. The choice of President was very satisfactory. Mr. Cushing was a man of much experience in politics and legislation. He was possessed of wide intellectual culture, and was
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 1
as afterward one of the most active insurgents against the National Government, as the so-called Secretary of War of Jefferson Davis, led the way. He spoke for the delegates from Alabama, who had been instructed by the convention that appointed themeir principles, ay, and bringing the sectionalism of the North at their feet by their gallantry. One of these was Jefferson Davis. In a speech in Faneuil Hall, on the 11th of October, 1858, while denouncing the Abolitionists as disunionists, he hen Vice-president of the United States under President Buchanan, and subsequent events show that he was a co-worker with Davis and others against the Government. He joined the insurgents, and, during a portion of the civil war that ensued, he was the socalled Secretary of War of Jefferson Davis. Vehement applause followed. A vote by States was taken, and Breckinridge received eighty-one ballots against twenty-four for Daniel S. Dickinson, of New York. The latter candidate was withdrawn, an
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 1
Republican Convention, 31. nomination of Abraham Lincoln for the Presidency, 32. the four parties, 33. the contest, and election of Lincoln, 34. In the spring of the year 1861, a civil war wasential candidate, and on the third ballot Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, was nominated. The announcourned, with nine cheers for the ticket. Mr. Lincoln, the nominee, was at his home in Springfiel telegraph there wrote on a scrap of paper, Mr. Lincoln, you are nominated, and sent a boy with it to the nominee. Mr. Lincoln read it to his friends, and, while they huzzaed lustily, he looked at e is a little woman down at our house, said Mr. Lincoln, in allusion to his wife, as he left the roPresident Ashmun at their head, waited upon Mr. Lincoln, and formally communicated to him, orally, uthority of municipal law. Of this party, Abraham Lincoln was the standard-bearer. 2. The wing otional Constitution. But the election of Mr. Lincoln, which was the result of the great politica
Herschel V. Johnson (search for this): chapter 1
rotect the interests of the South. This speech had a powerful effect upon delegates from the Free-labor States, in favor of Mr. Douglas; and of one hundred and ninety-four and a half votes cast, on the second ballot, he received one hundred and eighty-one and a half, when he was declared duly nominated for the Presidency. James Fitzpatrick, of Alabama, was nominated for Vice-president. Two days afterward, Fitzpatrick declined the nomination, when the National Committee substituted Herschel V. Johnson, of Georgia. The National Committee assembled at the National Hotel, in Washington City, on the 25th of June. In it all the States were represented, excepting Delaware, South Carolina, Mississippi, and Oregon. On the evening of the 23d, the Convention made a final adjournment. The Maryland Institute in 1860. The seceders, new and old assembled at noon on Saturday, the 23d, in the Maryland Institute Hall, situate on Baltimore Street and Marsh Market Space, a room more than t
with the Secessionists. They exhibited, as credentials, a certificate of the Trustees of the National Democratic Hall in New York, signed by Samuel B. Williams, Chairman, M. Dudley Bean, Secretary of the Trustees. It was also signed by William Beach Lawrence, Chairman, and James B. Bensel, Secretary, of an Executive Committee; aChairman, and James B. Bensel, Secretary, of an Executive Committee; and Thaddeus P. Mott, Chairman, and J. Lawrence, Secretary of the Association, whatever it was. These certified that Gideon J. Tucker and Dr. Charles Edward Lewis Stuart had been appointed delegates at large from the Association ; and that Colonel Baldwin, Isaac Lawrence, James B. Bensel, and James Villiers, had been appointed DeleChairman, and J. Lawrence, Secretary of the Association, whatever it was. These certified that Gideon J. Tucker and Dr. Charles Edward Lewis Stuart had been appointed delegates at large from the Association ; and that Colonel Baldwin, Isaac Lawrence, James B. Bensel, and James Villiers, had been appointed Delegates, and N. Drake Parsons, James S. Selby: M. Dudley Bean, and A. W. Gilbert, Alternatives, to represent the Association at the Richmond Convention for the nomination of President and Vice-president, &c. They were finally treated with courteous contempt, by being simply admitted to the floor of the Convention as tolerated t comm
Virginians (search for this): chapter 1
, that the terrible war was clearly the fruit of a conspiracy against the nationality of the Republic, and an attempt, in defiance of the laws of Divine Equity, to establish an Empire upon a basis of injustice and a denial of the dearest rights of man. That conspiracy budded when the Constitution of the Republic became the supreme law of the land, Immediately after the adoption of the National Constitution, and the beginning of the National career, in 1789, the family and State pride of Virginians could not feel contented in a sphere of equality in which that Constitution placed all the States. It still claimed for that Commonwealth a superiority, and a right to political and social domination in the Republic. Disunion was openly and widely talked of in Virginia, as a necessary conservator of State supremacy, during Washington's first term as President of the United States, and became more and more a concrete political dogma. It was because of the prevalence of this dangerous and
June 11th (search for this): chapter 1
to wait for further developments; so, on the evening of the 3d of May, 1860. they adjourned to meet in the city of Richmond, in Virginia, on the second Monday of June following, for further action. To that Convention they invited the Democracy of the country who might sympathize with their movement and their platform to send representatives. The seceders reassembled in Metropolitan Hall (on Franklin Street, near Governor), in Richmond, at the appointed time, namely, on Monday, the 11th day of June. In the mean time some of the leading Southern Congressmen, among whom were Robert Toombs, of Georgia, and other conspirators, had issued an address from Washington City, urging that the Richmond Convention should refrain from all important action, and adjourn to Baltimore, and there, re-entering the regular Convention, if possible defeat the nomination of Mr. Douglas, and thus, as they said, with well-feigned honesty of expression, make a final effort to preserve the harmony and unity
V. Johnson, of Georgia. The National Committee assembled at the National Hotel, in Washington City, on the 25th of June. In it all the States were represented, excepting Delaware, South Carolina, Mississippi, and Oregon. On the evening of the 23d, the Convention made a final adjournment. The Maryland Institute in 1860. The seceders, new and old assembled at noon on Saturday, the 23d, in the Maryland Institute Hall, situate on Baltimore Street and Marsh Market Space, a room more than23d, in the Maryland Institute Hall, situate on Baltimore Street and Marsh Market Space, a room more than three hundred feet in length and seventy in breadth, with a gallery extending entirely around. It was capable of seating five thousand people; and it was almost full when the Convention was permanently organized by the appointment of Mr. Cushing to preside. That gentleman was greeted, when he ascended the platform, with the most vociferous applause, and other demonstrations of satisfaction. On taking the chair, he declared that the body then assembled formed the true National Democratic Con
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