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Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ohn S. Phelps, of Missouri; Albert Rust, of Arkansas; William A. Howard, of Michigan; George S. Hawkins, of Florida; A. J. Hamilton, of Texas; C. C. Washburn, of Wisconsin; S. R. Curtis, of Iowa; John C. Burch, of California; William Winslow, of Minnesota; and Lansing Stout, of Oregon. The Speaker, in framing this Committee, choseh, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The West, Ohio, Indiana,, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas. The Pacific, Oregon and California. The South, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabobert Toombs, of Georgia; Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi; H. M. Rice, of Minnesota; Stephen A. Douglas, of Illinois; Benjamin Wade, of Ohio; J. R. Doolittle, of Wisconsin. and J. W. Grimes, of Iowa., The Committee; was composed of eight Democrats and five Republicans. On the same day, the. venerable John J. Crittenden offered to
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 4
convention of the Slave-labor States, to consider their grievances, and to take action for their defense. He reminded the Virginians of the coincidence of the people of the two States in long cherishing sentiments of disunion. He pointed to their public acts relative to meditated revolt, under certain contingencies. See resolutions of the General Assembly of Virginia, in March, 1847, concerning the measure known as the Wilmot Proviso, in relation to Slavery in the region just taken from Mexico. He reminded them of the dangers which had just menaced their State by the raid of John Brown and twenty men, at Harper's Ferry, of the implacable condition of Northern opinion concerning Slavery; and the rapid increase of Abolition sentiment in the Free-labor States. He reminded them that the South had a right to demand the repeal of all laws hurtful to Slavery; the disbanding of every society which was agitating the Northern mind against Southern institutions ; and the surrender of the po
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
n, of Rhode Island; W. G. Whiteley, of Delaware; M. W. Tappen, of New Hampshire; John L. N. Stratton, of New Jersey; F. M. Bristow, of Kentucky; J. S. Morrill, of Vermont; T. A. R. Nelson, of Tennessee; Wm. McKee Dunn, of Indiana; Miles Taylor, of Louisiana; Reuben Davis, of Mississippi; William Kellogg, of Illinois; George S. Hous Feb. 7, 1861, reported in Congressional Globe. Mr. Vallandigham proposed the following grouping of States in the four sections:--The North, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The West, Ohio, Indiana,, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and K otherwise, for its pacification. This Committee consisted of L. W. Powell and John J. Crittenden, of Kentucky; William H. Seward, of New York; J. Collamer, of Vermont; William Bigler, of Pennsylvania; R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia; Robert Toombs, of Georgia; Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi; H. M. Rice, of Minnesota; Stephen A. D
Pensacola (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
profound sensation. That action was greeted with delight by disunionists in most of the Slave-labor States. A hundred guns were fired both at Montgomery and Mobile, by order of the Governor (Moore) of Alabama, in honor of the event. In the latter city there was also a military parade. Bells were rung and oratory was heard. At Macon, Georgia, bells rang, bonfires blazed, cannon thundered, processions moved, and the main street of the city was illuminated. A hundred guns were fired at Pensacola. The same number were discharged in New Orleans, where the Pelican flag On the great seal of Louisiana is the device of a Pelican, hovering over a nest of young ones in the attitude of protection, at the same time feeding them. The same device was on the Louisiana flag. It was designed to symbolize the parental care of the National Government, and it appeared out of place in the hands of men banded to destroy that government. was unfurled, speeches were made to the populace, and no o
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
the exact day when an ordinance of secession would be passed in the coming State Convention; that Commissioners would be sent to Washington to treat on the terms of separation; that the demand would be made for the surrender of the forts in Charleston harbor into the hands of insurgents, and if surrender should be refused, armed South Carolinians would take them. He spoke of the weakness of the National Government with Buchanan at its head, and the consequently auspicious time for them then to This brought out William Porcher Miles, who assured the Convention that they had nothing to fear from any hostile action on the part of President Buchanan. There was not the least danger of his sending any re-enforcements to the forts in Charleston harbor. He (Miles) and some of his colleagues, he said, had conversed with the President December 9, 1860. on the subject, and had orally and in writing admonished him, that if he should attempt to send a solitary soldier to those forts, the ins
Oregon (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
rt Rust, of Arkansas; William A. Howard, of Michigan; George S. Hawkins, of Florida; A. J. Hamilton, of Texas; C. C. Washburn, of Wisconsin; S. R. Curtis, of Iowa; John C. Burch, of California; William Winslow, of Minnesota; and Lansing Stout, of Oregon. The Speaker, in framing this Committee, chose conservative men of the Free-labor States. Those holding extreme anti-slavery views were excluded. Mr. Pennington shared in the feeling throughout the Free-labor States, .that conciliation was des in the four sections:--The North, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The West, Ohio, Indiana,, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas. The Pacific, Oregon and California. The South, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Missouri. These were all Slave-labor States. This scheme for
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
and grand, Unnumbered fading hopes rebloom, and faltering hearts grow brave, And a consentaneous shout To the answering heavens rings out-- Off with the livery of disgrace, the baldric of the Slave! The telegraph instantly sent its swift messages with the intelligence to every accessible part of the Republic; and within twenty-four hours after the passage of the ordinance, the nation was profoundly moved by this open revolutionary act. Three days afterward, a railway train came in from Savannah with twenty delegates from an organization there, known as the Sons of the South. They represented, they said, three hundred and fifty gentlemen in Georgia, and were authorized to offer their services to the Governor of South Carolina, to aid in maintaining her noble and independent position. They brought with them the banner of their association, which was white, with the device of a Palmetto-tree, having its trunk entwined by a rattle-snake; also, five stars and a crescent, and the word
id, will desire to join us. lie proposed to let them in, on condition that the Southern Confederacy should be a Slaveholding Confederacy ; Anxious to secure European good-will, the leaders in the great revolt, when it assumed the form of civil war, tried to hide this fact — this great object of the Rebellion — but there were separate from yours, said the Address, in conclusion. To be one of a great Slaveholding Confederacy — stretching its arms over territory larger than any power in Europe possesses — with a population four times greater than that of the whole United States when they achieved their independence of the British Empire — with productiovery large, and the tide of trade and exchange was running so heavily in our favor toward the close of November, that coin soon came flowing into the country from Europe in immense volume. The pressure on the market, in the mean time, of unsalable foreign exchange, was so great, and the wants of commission merchants had become
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
Kellogg, of Illinois; George S. Houston, of Alabama; F. H. Morse, of Maine; John S. Phelps, of Missouri; Albert Rust, of Arkansas; William A. Howard, of Michigan; George S. Hawkins, of Florida; A. J. Hamilton, of Texas; C. C. Washburn, of Wisconsin; liatory suggestions were made by Representatives John Cochrane and Daniel E. Sickles, of New York; Thomas C. Hindman, of Arkansas; Clement L. Vallandigham, of Ohio; and John W. Noell, of Missouri. Mr. Cochrane, who was afterward a general in the N Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Missouri. These were all Slave-labor States. This scheme for dividing the States, and the lhoun; to Georgia, James L. Orr; to Florida, L. W. Spratt; to Mississippi, M. L. Bonham; to Louisiana, J. L. Manning; to Arkansas, A. C. Spain; to Texas, J. B. Kershaw; to Virginia, John S. Preston. to ask their co-operation; to propose the National
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
of Maryland; C. Robinson, of Rhode Island; W. G. Whiteley, of Delaware; M. W. Tappen, of New Hampshire; John L. N. Stratton, of New Jersey; F. M. Bristow, of Kentucky; J. S. Morrill, of Vermont; T. A. R. Nelson, of Tennessee; Wm. McKee Dunn, of Indiana; Miles Taylor, of Louisiana; Reuben Davis, of Mississippi; William Kellogg, of Illinois; George S. Houston, of Alabama; F. H. Morse, of Maine; John S. Phelps, of Missouri; Albert Rust, of Arkansas; William A. Howard, of Michigan; George S. Hawkiin Congressional Globe. Mr. Vallandigham proposed the following grouping of States in the four sections:--The North, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The West, Ohio, Indiana,, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas. The Pacific, Oregon and California. The South, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennes
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