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Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
t-House (which was Magruder's Headquarters in Yorktown), with the ruins of buildings near it, in 186mily, which was bombarded during the siege of Yorktown in 1781. a position, experts say, to performmes and York rivers, with his Headquarters at Yorktown, which he had fortified. Magruder had intendtend such assistance in storming the works at Yorktown and Gloucester, provided the latter position er. The latter stream heads within a mile of Yorktown, and, flowing Scene at Warwick Court-House.irst parallel was opened at about a mile from Yorktown, and under its protection batteries were estato assign to Franklin, namely, the turning of Yorktown by an attack on Gloucester, was the cause of his failure to attack Yorktown, and made rapid and brilliant operations impossible. Another and morttack upon us. and Johnston took command at Yorktown in person. The spectacle was now exhibitedd their morale. We did not carry with us from Yorktown so good an army as we took there. Of the bit[11 more...]
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
rimack, which, as we have observed, was burned and sunk at Norfolk in the spring of 1861. See page 898, volume I. She had lants, considerably crippled, withdrew, and went up toward Norfolk. Commodore Buchanan and several others on board the Meras soon as she got afloat again she turned her prow toward Norfolk, when the Monitor gave chase. The monster suddenly turned Fortress Monroe, and the Merrimack and her tenders toward Norfolk. The Minnesota, relieved of immediate danger, was lighten two days after the Monitor had sent the Merrimack back to Norfolk a disheartened cripple, Jefferson Davis, in a message to tousand men, while the eight thousand troops under Huger at Norfolk, he supposed to be fifteen thousand in number. When Genossible, until Huger might dismantle the fortifications at Norfolk, destroy the naval establishment there, and evacuate the sy Johnston himself. At that time the whole sea-coast below Norfolk to St. Augustine, excepting at Charleston and its immediat
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
s in the Shenandoah Valley, 368. Shields at Winchester skirmish near there, 369. battle of Kernstrectly in front of Banks, was pushed back to Winchester, where he was posted with his division of need to Mount Jackson, about forty miles above Winchester, where he was in direct communication with ang to warrant an attack, and he fell back to Winchester, for the twofold purpose of safety and drawision of Shields and some Michigan cavalry in Winchester. Spies informed Jackson of the weakening n a ridge, so as to cover the roads entering Winchester from the south. This position was about halge of Kernstown, and two and a half south of Winchester. Toward the evening of the 22d of March, lonel Kimball, of the Fourteenth Indiana, to Kernstown, supported by Daum's artillery, well posted.n an eligible situation half a mile south of Kernstown, completely masked by woods, which were filllready ordered it back. He also hastened to Winchester, took command in person, and followed the re[4 more...]
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ovements in the West) was soon gloriously carried out, as we have already observed; and before the Army of the Potomac had fairly inaugurated its campaign, in the spring of 1862, the active little army under Grant, and the forces of Buell and Pope, in connection with Foote's gun-boats and mortars, had captured Forts Henry and Donelson, Nashville and Columbus; had driven the Confederates out of Kentucky; had seized the Gibraltar of the Mississippi (Island Number10); and had penetrated to Northern Alabama, and fought the. great battles and won a victory at Shiloh. See Chapters VII., VIII., IX., and X. At that conference, McClellan expressed his unwillingness to develop his plans, always believing, he said, that in military matters the fewer persons knowing them the better. He would tell them if he was ordered to do so. The President then asked him if he counted upon any particular time; he did not ask what time that was, but had he in his own mind any particular time fixed when a
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 15
battle of Kernstown, 370. the defense of Washington City made sure, 371. the Confederates on the vements in Kentucky were to precede any from Washington. McDowell's Notes. This part of the plan ving a competent force for the protection of Washington; that not more than fifty thousand troops shns, and from 26 to 30 siege-guns in front of Washington. See General McClellan's Report, pages 56 an Hampton Roads, informed the authorities at Washington that the Merrimack was ready for action, theenced. It was important for the security of Washington, to hold the Confederates in check in Westerication with a force at Luray and another at Washington, on the eastern side of the mountain,. not f morning March 22, 1862. he departed for Washington City by way of Harper's Ferry, in obedience tof these would reduce the force in and around Washington to less than 15,000 men. This matter was refit would serve the other purpose of covering Washington, for it was to occupy a position to prevent [15 more...]
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
The object was to flank the insurgents at Manassas and Centreville, relieve Washington, threaten Richmond, and paralyze thereceived information that the Confederates had abandoned Centreville and Manassas, and were falling back toward Richmond, by McClellan was quietly maturing plans for the seizure of Centreville and Manassas, when Johnston suddenly gave orders for a garmies. On receiving information of the evacuation of Centreville and Manassas, March 9. McClellan crossed the Potomac, a advance, composed of Colonel Averill's cavalry, reached Centreville on the 10th. The works there and at Manassas Junction wey, he put the first division of his corps in motion for Centreville, under General Williams, leaving only the division of Shom Headquarters, leaving his staff-officers to start for Centreville in the afternoon. He was soon made to retrace his stepsss after Williams's division, then far on its way toward Centreville. Banks, who was informed by telegraph of the battle, ha
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ington, into an expedition for the immediate object of seizing and occupying a point upon the railroad southwest of Manassas Junction, the details of the movement (which was to take place on or before the 22d of February) to be left to the discretio4, 55. His advance, composed of Colonel Averill's cavalry, reached Centreville on the 10th. The works there and at Manassas Junction were abandoned, and yet the Confederates were not far away for four days afterward. March 14, 1862. General Stonemt, on the condition that a sufficient force should be left for the perfect security of Washington City, and to hold Manassas Junction. General McClellan issued a stirring address to his soldiers, in the form of a General Order, in which he said: ourt House had been conditionally sanctioned by the President, and he was ordered to place the bulk of his force at Manassas Junction and vicinity, and to repair the Manassas Gap Railway, so as to have a rapid and direct communication with the Shena
Beaufort, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
in the same direction. Her main-mast was crippled by a shot sent from Sewell's Point when she was passing, and when within a mile and a half of Newport-Newce she ran aground. There she was attacked by the Merrimack and two of the Confederate gun-boats, the Jamestown and Patrick Henry. The armed vessels that assisted the Merrimack in her raid, were the Patrick Henry, Commander Tucker, 6 guns; Jamestown, Lieutenant-Commanding Barney, 2 guns; and Raleigh, Lieutenant-Commanding Alexander; Beaufort, Lieutenant-Commanding Parker, and Teazer, Lieutenant-Commanding Webb, each one gun. Fortunately, the water was so shallow that the Merrimack could not approach within a mile of her. She fought gallantly, and at dusk her assailants, considerably crippled, withdrew, and went up toward Norfolk. Commodore Buchanan and several others on board the Merrimack were wounded. The Commander was so badly hurt that Captain Jones, his second in command, took charge of the vessels. Two of her guns we
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 15
ter. Lander's career as an independent commander was short. His wound became painful from constant exertions, and this, with anxiety and exposure, brought on disease which assumed the form of a fatal congestion of the brain. He died on the 2d of March, when his country lost one of its ablest defenders. For his brief but valuable services in Western Virginia, the Secretary of War had publicly thanked him. Feb. 17 1862 General Shields, another brave soldier, who had done good service in Mexico, was appointed Lander's successor in command of the troops of the latter. In the mean time General Banks, commanding the Fifth Corps, had sent a force under Colonel Geary to reoccupy Harper's Ferry, See page 138. as the first step toward seizing and holding the Shenandoah Valley. He took command there in person late in February, and with his forces occupied the heights near the ferry; also Charleston and Leesburg, and other important points on each side of the Blue Ridge. Jackson, wh
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
other brave soldier, who had done good service in Mexico, was appointed Lander's successor in command of the troops of the latter. In the mean time General Banks, commanding the Fifth Corps, had sent a force under Colonel Geary to reoccupy Harper's Ferry, See page 138. as the first step toward seizing and holding the Shenandoah Valley. He took command there in person late in February, and with his forces occupied the heights near the ferry; also Charleston and Leesburg, and other importanederate force immediately in front, excepting Ashby's cavalry, General Banks believed General Jackson to be too weak or too prudent, to attack Shields, and at ten o'clock that morning March 22, 1862. he departed for Washington City by way of Harper's Ferry, in obedience to a a summons from Headquarters, leaving his staff-officers to start for Centreville in the afternoon. He was soon made to retrace his steps by the sounds of battle in his rear. At the time when the National scouts saw noth
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